by FM Steve Stoyko

Part One

The following materials are based on a lecture by Steve Stoyko to the Kenilworth Chess Club on May 12, 2005. Click on the moves and variations below to see them in the Java Board to your left. The text is divided into two parts, and you can also download the PGN file.

Part One  |  Part Two  |  PGN

This lecture is on the Isolated Queen Pawn or "Isolani" position, which can occur in a wide range of openings, including Caro-Kann, Semi-Tarrasch, Alekhine, c3-Sicilian, Nimzo, QGA, and even the Benoni. So it is a widely useful piece of opening knowledge. Before we get into the opening, though, let's just look at the pawn position that is typical of the Isolani game:

 


White would be practically lost in an endgame.

Analysis position - Black

Steve Stoyko Lecture/Kenilworth, NJ (1) 2005


This is the thematic pawn formation of the Isolated Queen Pawn. The position of the pawns in the middlegame gives White a space advantage, two open files, a potential square at e5 or c5, and prospects of a kingside attack with a battery of Queen and Bishop on the b1-h7 diagonal. But if the pieces get exchanged, the pawn formation will favor Black considerably in an ending. Here, in this position, Black to move has some winning chance due to the isolated QP. Let's look at a few moves:

1... Kf8 2. f4 Ke7 3. Kf2 Kd6 4. Ke3 Kd5 and Black is better *


But, as someone once said, "before the endgame, the Gods have placed the middlegame." And White's advantages in the middlegame are significant -- but only if he plays it right.

Back in the 19th Century, when the isolani position became known, it was typically played with the following set-up for White:


The old way of playing this position led to exchanges.

Analysis position - Black

Steve Stoyko Lecture/Kenilworth, NJ (2) 2005


In these early days of the line, White would typically strive for this type of position: controlling central squares and using the c-file. But Rooks can easily be exchanged along the c-file and White does not have a very active plan in this position. So it can easily lead to the endgames that Black wants. Let's take a look:

1. a3 Na5 and the likely exchanges along the c-file will lead to at least equality for Black -- and bring him closer to his goal of a better ending. 1... Re8 *


The Modern way of playing the Isolani position for White emphasizes his control of e5 and chances of a kingside attack. To that end, the Rooks typically go to d1 and e1 and White seeks to avoid exchanges as much as possible.


White has a powerful battery: the threat is mate!

Analysis position - Black

Steve Stoyko Lecture/Kenilworth, NJ (3) 2005


This is the ideal attacking position for White. Black is now forced to weaken his kingside, and White will retain the threat of d5 -- but first might play Bb3, Bh6, Ne5, etc. depending on circumstances.

1... g6[]


Let's look at some typical ways in which these positions can arise out of the opening. I know a lot of people at the club play the c3-Sicilian lines.

Analysis game - Black [D42]

c3-Sicilian Move Order/Kenilworth, NJ (4) 2005


1. e4 c5 1... c6 2. d4 d5 3. exd5 cxd5 4. c4 2. c3 d5 3. exd5 Qxd5 4. d4 e6 4... Nf6 4... cxd4 5. Nf3 Nf6 6. Bd3 6. Be2 6. Na3 is not a move to be feared, since the Black pieces are centralized. 6... Be7 7. O-O cxd4 annotated as bad, in part because it opens the c3 square for the White Knight 8. cxd4 O-O 9. Nc3 Qd8! Seems counter-intuitive, since the Queen is well developed. One option is Qd6-b8 but then the Bishop might be hanging at e7 upon d5 at some point. 9... Qd6?! 9... Qh5!? 10. Re1 Nc6 11. a3 b6 12. Bc2 Bb7 13. Qd3 in the Nimzo-Indian the same position can arise with the Rook at c8. All books consider the position as basically equal no matter whose move it is. But those books are written from Black's perspective. And theory is all perspectival. It's based on what the writer is trying to sell. * [Stoyko]


So we start to see how the pieces get placed for both sides.

Let's look at the typical position of the pieces.

For White, the best placement of the Rooks is on d1 and e1. Black typically plays his Rooks to c8 and e8 -- the latter to help defend the Bishop at e7 in case of d5.

One problem for both players is where to develop the Queen's Bishop. For Black, the Bishop can develop by Bd7-c6; b6 and Bb7; or a6, b5, and Bb7 -- the last method taking an extra move. Generally speaking, GMs think the b6 and Bb7 plan is best. The problem with Bd7-c6 is that the Bishop is exposed to attack by Ne5. Meanwhile, another advantage of the b6 plan is that it eliminates the potential outpost square c5. Too slow and potentially weakening is a6 and b5, which leaves a weakness at c5 on the dark squares.

White meanwhile will wait to develop his dark-squared Bishop until he knows where it is best. Often useful is Bg5, but the Bishop may need to defend the d-pawn with Be3 or may play Bh6 if Black plays g6.

The Knights generally go to their most centralized aquares on c6, f6, c3 and f3. The Black queenside Knight has a choice between c6 or d7. The c6 square helps put pressure on d4-pawn, which is good because if you don't attack the pawn then White doesn't have to defend it and can attack you on the kingside. Karpov plays the Knight to both squares.

The Black Queen is not that easy to place.

Where should the White Queen go? The ideal square is d3. What if you could put the Bishop at g5, the Queen at d3 or c2 and Bb1 or c2. Suddenly to stop mate Black at least has to weaken his kingside structure. Powerful. That's why Black sometimes plays to stop this battery, either with Nb4 or Ba6!? to stop Qd3. To meet Nb4, you must play a3 to stop that. Meeting Ba6 is a bit trickier and we might save that for another lecture.

The isolated pawn has a lust to expand. But White does not want to push the pawn to d5 unless he can guarantee that it will lead to something. Otherwise you have mere equality.

Let's look at another way this position can arise -- with a subtle difference. You have to be aware of transpositions and differences.


Black gets an extra move in the Nimzo move order.

Analysis game - Black [D42]

Nimzo-Indian Move Order/Kenilworth, NJ (5)


1. d4 Nf6 2. c4 e6 3. Nc3 Bb4 4. e3 the Rubinstein Variation allows Black to choose to a large degree 4... c5 4... Ne4!? 5. Nf3 O-O 6. Bd3 d5 7. O-O 7. cxd5 cxd4!? (7... exd5 gives White the initiative in a symmetric position) 8. exd4 Nxd5 9. Qc2 is the main move(9. O-O!? Nxc3 10. bxc3 Bxc3 11. Bxh7+) 7... dxc4 making the Bishop move twice is always legitimate 8. Bxc4 cxd4 9. exd4 Nc6 10. a3 Be7 11. Re1 b6 12. Bd3!? 12. d5 exd5 13. Nxd5 Nxd5 14. Qxd5 Bb7 15. Qh5 12. Qd3 Na5 13. Ba2 Bb7 12... Bb7 13. Bc2 Rc8 14. Qd3 *


Black suddenly has an extra move. It may or may not be significant, but you need to be aware of it.

Another thing to be aware of is the way that the Knights control related squares. Often, if Black's King Knight goes to d5 you want to consider playing your Queen Knight to e4. And when Black moves his Queen Knight (to a5-c4 for example) suddenly your King Knight has free access to e5. See the Christiansen game below for a good example of these corresponding Knight squares in action.


Knights and Related Squares

Analysis game - Black [B10]

Caro-Kann / Panov-Botvinnik Move Order/Kenilworth, NJ (6) 2005


1. e4 c6 2. d4 d5 3. exd5 cxd5 4. c4 e6 4... Nf6 4... Nc6 5. Nc3 Nf6 6. Nf3 Be7 6... Bb4!? resembles the Nimzo 7. cxd5 7. Bd3?! dxc4 8. Bxc4 7... Nxd5 Everyone following Nimzovich thinks that the Knight blockading the pawn is good. But, while it is true that the Knight controls the isolated pawn's "lust to expand," it has a couple major drawbacks. It interferes with other pieces. White does not want to exchange Knights at d5 since Qxd5 would be fatal for the d-pawn. Simplification is to be avoided. The two knights are in a dance and if they come off then Black is close to winning strategically. So White needs to play Ne4 to avoid the exchange. 7... exd5 8. Bd3+/= 8. Bd3 Nc6 This Knight can try to get to d5 to keep up the good counterbalance of the Knights at c3 and f6, then White's Knight at f3 gains power and he can play Ne5! followed by Qf3-h3 with attack 9. O-O O-O 9... Ncb4 10. Bb1 O-O 11. a3+/= 10. Ne4! This is not something that White wants to do when the Knight is at f6 and can exchange. * [Stoyko]


As I mentioned, Black wants to try to stop White from setting up his battery of Bishop at c2 and Queen at d3. Here's one way the struggle of the opening might turn on that issue:

 

Analysis game - Black [D42]

Caro-Kann /Kenilworth, NJ (7) 2005


1. e4 c6 2. d4 d5 3. exd5 cxd5 4. c4 e6 4... Nf6 4... Nc6 5. Nc3 Nf6 6. Nf3 Be7 6... Bb4!? resembles the Nimzo 7. cxd5 7. Bd3?! dxc4 8. Bxc4 7... Nxd5 Everyone following Nimzovich thinks that the Knight blockading the pawn is good. But, while it is true that the Knight controls the isolated pawn's "lust to expand," it has a couple major drawbacks. It interferes with other pieces. White does not want to exchange Knights at d5 since Qxd5 would be fatal for the d-pawn. Simplification is to be avoided. The two knights are in a dance and if they come off then Black is close to winning strategically. So White needs to play Ne4 to avoid the exchange. 7... exd5 8. Bd3+/= 8. Bd3 Nc6 This Knight can try to get to d5 to keep up the good counterbalance of the Knights at c3 and f6, then White's Knight at f3 gains power and he can play Ne5! followed by Qf3-h3 with attack 9. O-O O-O 9... Ncb4 10. Bb1 O-O 11. a3+/= 10. Re1! 10. Ne4!? This is not something that White wants to do when the Knight is at f6 and can exchange. 10... Nf6! 10... b6? 11. Nxd5! Qxd5 (11... exd5 12. Bxh7+ (12. Qc2 Nb4 13. Bxh7+ Kh8) 12... Kxh7 13. Qc2+) 12. Be4 Qd6 13. Ne5 Bb7 14. Bf4+- 11. a3 b6 12. Bc2 12. Ne5!? Bb7 13. Ba6! Bxa6 14. Nxc6 Qc7 15. Nxe7+ Qxe7 16. Bg5+/= h6?? 17. Nd5! Qd8 18. Nxf6+ gxf6 19. Bxh6+- 12... Ba6!? * [Stoyko]


Steve Stoyko - Dennis Strenzwilk [D42]

New York Open/New York, USA 1988


1. e4 d5 2. exd5 Nf6 3. c4 c6 4. d4 cxd5 5. Nc3 e6 6. Nf3 Be7 7. cxd5 Nxd5 8. Bd3 Nc6 9. O-O O-O 10. Re1 b6? 10... Bf6!? Spassky-Petrosian 11. Be4! 11. Nxd5 exd5

 

White to move after 11...exd5

 

12. Bxh7+ 12. Qc2 Nb4! 12... Kxh7 13. Qc2+ Kg8 14. Qxc6 Black has the Bishop pair and play against White's Queen. 14... Bf5 15. Bf4 Be4 16. Rac1 16. Ne5!? 16... Bb4 16... Bxf3 17. gxf3+/- 17. Bg5 17. Rxe4!? dxe4 18. Qxe4 17... f6 18. Qe6+ Rf7 18... Kh8 19. Bd2 19. Rxe4 dxe4

 

White to move after 19...dxe4

 

20. Ne5!! Qe7 21. Qxf7+ Qxf7 22. Nxf7 fxg5!? 22... Kxf7 23. Rc7+ Ke6 24. Be3+/- 23. Rc7 23. Nxg5?? Bd2 23... Bd2 24. Kf1 Bf4 25. Ne5 Re8 25... Rd8 26. Rd7 26. Rxa7 Bxe5 27. dxe5 Rxe5 28. Ke2 Re6 29. Ke3 Kh7 30. Rc7 30. Ra4 Rc6 30... Kg6 31. Rc4 Kf5 32. g4+ Kf6 33. Rxe4 Rc6 34. Kd3 Kf7 35. a4 Rf6 36. Ke3 Rh6 37. Rb4 Ke7 38. Rb5 Rg6 39. Ke4 Kd7 40. Kf5 and White soon won. 1-0 [Stoyko]


Lajos Portisch - Anatoly Karpov [D42]

Milan/Italy 1975


1. d4 Nf6 2. c4 e6 3. Nc3 Bb4 4. e3 O-O 5. Bd3 d5 6. Nf3 c5 7. O-O dxc4 8. Bxc4 cxd4 9. exd4 Nc6 10. a3 Be7 11. Re1 b6 12. Bd3 Bb7 13. Bc2 Re8 13... Rc8 14. Qd3 14. Qd3 Rc8 14... a6? 15. d5! exd5 16. Bg5 Ne4 (16... g6? 17. Rxe7+- Qxe7 18. Nxd5 Nxd5 19. Bxe7 Ncxe7 20. Qd4+/-) 17. Nxe4 dxe4 18. Qxe4 g6 19. Qh4 14... g6[] "all other moves lose" because given the move White can play d5! 15. d5! exd5 16. Bg5 Ne4 17. Nxe4 dxe4 18. Qxe4 g6 19. Qh4 h5 In Petrosian-Balashov, USSR 1974, the game went 19... Qc7 20. Bb3! h5 21. Qe4! Kg7 22. Bxf7!! Kxf7 23. Bh6!! Qd6 24. Qc4+ Kf6 25. Rad1 Nd4 (25... Qc7) 26. Qxd4+ Qxd4 27. Rxd4 Rc5 (27... a6 28. Rf4#) 28. h4! and Black resigned. 20. Rad1?! 20. Bb3!-> 20... Qc7 21. Bxg6?! fxg6 22. Qc4+?! 22. Re6! 22... Kg7 23. Bf4 Ba6 24. Qc3+ Bf6 25. Bxc7 Bxc3 26. Rxe8+/- 1-0 [Stoyko]


Larry Christiansen - Florin Gheorghiu [D42]

Torremolinos 1977


1. c4 c5 2. Nf3 Nf6 3. Nc3 e6 4. e3 d5 5. cxd5 Nxd5 6. d4 cxd4 7. exd4 Be7 8. Bd3 Nc6 9. O-O O-O 10. Re1 Nf6 11. a3 b6 12. Bc2 Bb7 13. Qd3 g6 14. Bh6 Re8 15. Rad1 Rc8 16. Bb3 Na5 17. Ba2 Nd5 18. Ne4 Rc7 19. Ne5 Bf8

 


White to move after 19...Bf8

 

20. Bg5 Be7 21. Bxe7 Rexe7 22. Bxd5 exd5 23. Nf6+ Kg7 24. Qh3 h5 25. Nxh5+ gxh5 26. Rd3 Qh8 27. Rg3+ Kf8 28. Rg5 Re6 29. Qxe6 fxe6 30. Ng6+ Kg7 31. Nxh8+ Kxh8 32. Rxh5+ Kg7 33. h4 Nc6 34. Rxe6 Nxd4 35. Rg5+ Kh7 36. Rd6 Rf7 37. f3 Nf5 38. Rxf5 Rxf5 39. Rd7+ Kg6 40. Rxb7 Rf4 41. Rxa7 1-0


Sammy Reshevsky - Tigran Petrosian [E55]

Santa Monica 1966/Calikfornia, USA 1966


1. d4 Nf6 2. c4 e6 3. Nc3 Bb4 4. e3 c5 5. Bd3 O-O 6. Nf3 d5 7. O-O dxc4 8. Bxc4 Nbd7 9. Bd3 b6 10. a3 cxd4 11. exd4 11. axb4 dxc3 12. bxc3 11. Nb5 11... Be7 12. Re1 Bb7 13. Bd2?! 13. Bc2! Rc8 14. Qd3 13... a6 13... Bd5 14. Nxd5 Nxd5 15. Ne5 14. Qe2 b5 15. Rad1 Nb6 16. Bg5 Rc8 17. Ne5 Nbd5 18. Ne4?! Nxe4 19. Bxe7 Nxe7 20. Bxe4 Bxe4 21. Qxe4 Qd5!=/+ 22. Qxd5 Nxd5 1/2-1/2 [Stoyko]


Owen - Mapes [D42]

corr ch-USA 1866


1. e4 c6 2. d4 d5 3. exd5 cxd5 4. c4 Nf6 5. Nc3 e6 6. Nf3 Be7 7. cxd5 Nxd5 8. Bd3 Nc6 9. O-O O-O 10. Re1 Nf6 11. a3 b6 12. Bc2 Bb7 13. Qd3 g6 14. Bh6 Re8 15. Rad1 Qc7 16. d5 Rad8 16... Nxd5 17. Rxe6!! 17. dxe6 Rxd3 18. exf7+ Kxf7 19. Bb3+ Nd5 20. Rxd3 Nd8 21. Nxd5 Bxd5 22. Bxd5+ Kf6 23. Ng5 1-0


Florin Gheorghiu - Slim Bouaziz [D42]

1990


1. d4 Nf6 2. c4 e6 3. Nf3 c5 4. e3 d5 5. Nc3 Nc6 6. cxd5 Nxd5 7. Bd3 Be7 8. O-O cxd4 9. exd4 O-O 10. Re1 Qd6 11. Nxd5 exd5 12. Ne5 Nxe5 13. dxe5 Qb6 14. Qc2 h6 15. Be3 d4 16. Bf4 Bd7 17. Qe2 a6 18. Qe4 g6 19. Bxh6 Rfe8 20. Qf4 Be6 1-0


Liuben Spassov - Florin Gheorghiu [D42]

1982


1. Nf3 c5 2. c4 Nf6 3. Nc3 e6 4. e3 d5 5. cxd5 Nxd5 6. d4 Nc6 7. Bd3 cxd4 8. exd4 Be7 9. O-O O-O 10. Re1 Nf6 11. a3 b6 12. Ne5 Bb7 13. Ba6 Qc8 14. Bxb7 Qxb7 15. Nxc6 Qxc6 16. d5 Qc4 1/2-1/2


Florin Gheorghiu - Ronald Henley [D42]

1982


1. c4 c5 2. Nf3 Nf6 3. Nc3 e6 4. d4 d5 5. cxd5 Nxd5 6. e3 Nc6 7. Bd3 cxd4 8. exd4 Be7 9. O-O O-O 10. Re1 Nf6 11. a3 b6 12. Bc2 Ba6 13. b4 Bc4 14. Ne5 Nxe5 15. dxe5 Qxd1 16. Rxd1 Nd5 17. Nxd5 Bxd5 18. Be3 Rfc8 19. Bd3 a5 20. Rab1 Rc3 21. Bxb6 axb4 22. axb4 Bb3 1/2-1/2


Florin Gheorghiu - Margeir Petursson [D42]

USA 1979


1. d4 Nf6 2. c4 e6 3. Nf3 d5 4. Nc3 c5 5. e3 Nc6 6. cxd5 Nxd5 7. Bd3 cxd4 8. exd4 Be7 9. O-O O-O 10. Re1 Bf6 11. Be4 Qd6 12. Bg5 Bxg5 13. Nxg5 h6 14. Nf3 Bd7 15. Bxd5 exd5 16. Ne5 Be6 17. Nxc6 Qxc6 18. Rc1 Rac8 19. Qd2 Qa6 20. Re5 Qc6 21. h3 Rfe8 22. Rce1 f6 23. R5e2 Bf7 24. Qf4 Rxe2 25. Rxe2 Re8 26. Rxe8+ Qxe8 27. Kh2 Qd8 28. Nb5 Qb6 29. a4 a6 30. Qb8+ Kh7 31. Qd6 Qc6 32. Qxc6 bxc6 33. Nc7 a5 34. Na6 Bg6 35. b4 1-0


Zoltan Ribli - Florin Gheorghiu [D42]

Warsaw 1979


1. c4 c5 2. Nf3 Nf6 3. Nc3 e6 4. e3 Nc6 5. d4 d5 6. cxd5 Nxd5 7. Bd3 cxd4 8. exd4 Be7 9. O-O O-O 10. Re1 Nf6 11. a3 b6 12. Bc2 Bb7 13. Qd3 g6 14. Bh6 Re8 15. Rad1 Rc8 16. h4 Nd5 17. Nxd5 Qxd5 18. Qd2 Qd6 19. Be4 Na5 20. Bxb7 Nxb7 21. Ng5 Na5 22. d5 Qxd5 23. Qxd5 exd5 24. Rxd5 Nc6 25. b4 a6 26. Rc1 Red8 27. Rxd8+ Bxd8 28. Ne4 f5 29. Nd6 Rc7 30. Ne8 Rc8 31. b5 axb5 32. Nd6 Rc7 33. Nxb5 Rc8 34. g3 Ne7 35. Rd1 Nc6 36. Rd7 Be7 37. Kg2 Bc5 38. Nd6 Bxd6 39. Rxd6 b5 40. Rd7 b4 41. axb4 Nxb4 42. h5 Nc6 43. hxg6 hxg6 44. Rg7+ Kh8 45. Rxg6 Ne5 46. Re6 Ng4 47. Bf4 Rc2 48. Be5+ Kg8 49. Bd4 Rd2 50. Bb6 Kf7 51. Rc6 Rb2 52. Ba7 Ra2 53. Bd4 Rd2 54. Rc4 Ke6 55. Ra4 Kd5 56. Ba7 Ne5 57. Be3 Rc2 58. Rd4+ Ke6 59. Rd1 1/2-1/2


Gheorghiu - Arnason [D42]

USA 1978


1. d4 Nf6 2. c4 e6 3. Nf3 c5 4. e3 d5 5. Nc3 Nc6 6. cxd5 Nxd5 7. Bd3 cxd4 8. exd4 Be7 9. O-O O-O 10. Re1 Bf6 11. Be4 Nce7 12. Ne5 g6 13. Bh6 Bg7 14. Bxg7 Kxg7 15. Qb3 Nf6 16. Rad1 Nxe4 17. Nxe4 b6 18. h4 Bb7 19. h5 Nf5 20. Qh3 Qh4 21. Qxh4 Nxh4 22. f3 Rad8 23. Ng5 h6 24. Nexf7 hxg5 25. Nxd8 Rxd8 26. Rxe6 Rd7 27. Rde1 Kh6 28. Re7 Rxe7 29. Rxe7 Bd5 30. Rxa7 gxh5 31. Ra6 Kg7 32. b3 g4 33. fxg4 hxg4 34. g3 Nf3+ 35. Kf2 Nxd4 36. Rxb6 Bf3 37. a4 Kf7 38. a5 Ke7 39. a6 Kd7 40. a7 Ne6 41. b4 Nc7 42. b5 Na8 43. Rf6 Bd5 44. Ke3 1-0


Larry Christiansen - Florin Gheorghiu [D42]

Torremolinos 1977


1. c4 c5 2. Nf3 Nf6 3. Nc3 e6 4. e3 d5 5. cxd5 Nxd5 6. d4 cxd4 7. exd4 Be7 8. Bd3 Nc6 9. O-O O-O 10. Re1 Nf6 11. a3 b6 12. Bc2 Bb7 13. Qd3 g6 14. Bh6 Re8 15. Rad1 Rc8 16. Bb3 Na5 17. Ba2 Nd5 18. Ne4 Rc7 19. Ne5 Bf8 20. Bg5 Be7 21. Bxe7 Rexe7 22. Bxd5 exd5 23. Nf6+ Kg7 24. Qh3 h5 25. Nxh5+ gxh5 26. Rd3 Qh8 27. Rg3+ Kf8 28. Rg5 Re6 29. Qxe6 fxe6 30. Ng6+ Kg7 31. Nxh8+ Kxh8 32. Rxh5+ Kg7 33. h4 Nc6 34. Rxe6 Nxd4 35. Rg5+ Kh7 36. Rd6 Rf7 37. f3 Nf5 38. Rxf5 Rxf5 39. Rd7+ Kg6 40. Rxb7 Rf4 41. Rxa7 1-0


Alexander Beliavsky - Anatoly Karpov [D42]

1986


1. e4 c6 2. c4 d5 3. exd5 cxd5 4. cxd5 Nf6 5. Nc3 Nxd5 6. Nf3 Nc6 7. d4 e6 8. Bd3 Be7 9. O-O O-O 10. Re1 Nf6 11. a3 b6 12. Bg5 Bb7 13. Bc2 Rc8 14. Qd3 g6 15. Rad1 Nd5 16. Bh6 Re8 17. Ba4 a6 18. Nxd5 Qxd5 19. Qe3 Bf6 20. Bb3 Qd7 21. d5 exd5 22. Qxb6 Rxe1+ 23. Rxe1 Bxb2 24. Bxd5 Bg7 25. Bxg7 Kxg7 26. h4 Qxd5 27. Qxb7 Rb8 28. Qxa6 Rb3 29. Qa4 Rc3 30. Re3 Rc4 31. Qb3 Nd4 32. Qb2 Kh6 33. Ne5 Rc2 34. Qb8 Kg7 35. h5 Nf5 36. Re1 gxh5 37. Nf3 Qc5 38. Qe5+ Qxe5 39. Rxe5 Rc1+ 40. Kh2 Kf6 41. Rb5 Ra1 42. Rb6+ Kg7 1/2-1/2


Anatoly Karpov - Vlastimil Hort [D42]

1980


1. e4 c6 2. d4 d5 3. exd5 cxd5 4. c4 e6 5. Nf3 Nf6 6. Nc3 Be7 7. cxd5 Nxd5 8. Bd3 Nc6 9. O-O O-O 10. Re1 Nf6 11. a3 Qd6 12. Be3 Rd8 13. Qc2 Bd7 14. Rad1 Rac8 15. Bg5 h6 16. Bh4 Qb8 17. Qe2 Be8 18. Bb1 Nd5 19. Qd3 g6 20. Bg3 Bd6 21. Nxd5 exd5 22. Ne5 Qc7 23. Qe3 Qb6 24. Qxh6 Nxe5 25. dxe5 Bf8 26. Qg5 Qe6 27. Ba2 Bb5 28. h3 Rd7 29. Qe3 b6 30. Qf4 Bc4 31. Bb1 Bb3 32. Rd2 a5 33. Bd3 Rdc7 34. Kh2 Rc1 35. Rde2 Rxe1 36. Rxe1 Bc2 37. Ba6 Rc5 38. Be2 Bf5 39. Rd1 Qc6 40. Rd2 Rc2 41. Bf3 Be6 42. Qd4 Rxd2 43. Qxd2 Qc4 44. Be2 Qa2 45. Bf4 Bc5 46. Be3 d4 47. Bg5 Qd5 48. Bf6 Bf8 49. Bd3 Bg7 50. Qf4 Kh7 51. f3 b5 52. Kg3 Qd7 53. Bxg7 Kxg7 54. Qf6+ Kg8 55. h4 Qe8 56. h5 Bc4 57. h6 Qf8 58. Bxg6 Qxh6 59. Bxf7+ Kh7 60. Qf5+ Kh8 61. Qc8+ 1-0


Wolfgang Uhlmann - Anatoly Karpov [D42]

Leningrad (12) 1973


1. c4 c5 2. Nf3 Nf6 3. Nc3 d5 4. cxd5 Nxd5 5. e3 e6 6. d4 Nc6 7. Bd3 cxd4 8. exd4 Be7 9. O-O O-O 10. Re1 Nf6 11. a3 b6 12. Be3 Bb7 13. Rc1 Rc8 14. Bb1 Rc7 15. Qd3 Rd7 16. Qc2 g6 17. Ba2 Ng4 18. Rcd1 Nxe3 19. fxe3 Bf6 20. Qf2 Bg7 21. Rd2 Ne7 22. e4 h6 23. Red1 Qb8 24. Qe3 Rfd8 25. h3 Kh7 26. Kh1 a6 27. Rf2 Ng8 28. Rdf1 b5 29. h4 Nf6 30. Ne5 Rxd4 31. Rxf6 Qxe5 32. Rxf7 R8d7 33. Rxd7 Rxd7 34. Qh3 Rd6 35. Bb1 Rd2 36. h5 gxh5 37. Nd1 Bc6 38. Qf3 Be8 39. b4 Bg6 40. Nf2 Qd4 41. Nh3 e5 42. Nf2 Rb2 43. Kh2 Qc4 44. Rd1 Rb3 45. Nd3 Qxe4 0-1


Smyslov V - Karpov Anatoli [D42]

URS-ch39 Leningrad ;URS-ch 1971


1. c4 c5 2. Nf3 Nf6 3. Nc3 d5 4. cxd5 Nxd5 5. e3 e6 6. d4 cxd4 7. exd4 Be7 8. Bd3 O-O 9. O-O Nc6 10. Re1 Nf6 11. a3 b6 12. Bc2 Bb7 13. Qd3 Rc8 14. Bg5 g6 15. Rad1 Nd5 16. Bh6 Re8 17. Ba4 a6 18. Nxd5 Qxd5 19. Qe3 Bf6 20. b3 Qh5 21. d5 Nd8 22. d6 Rc5 23. d7 Re7 24. Qf4 Bg7 25. Qb8 Qxh6 26. Qxd8+ Bf8 27. Re3 Bc6 28. Qxf8+ Qxf8 29. d8=Q 1-0

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