The U.S. Team at the 7th World

Student Team Chess Championship

Leningrad 1960

It is almost forgotten today that, in a rare moment of success over the dominant Soviet chess teams of the post-WWII era, the U.S. sent a team to Leningrad for the 1960 World Student Team Chess Championship and walked off with the gold medal in a dominating performance. The team consisted of William Lombardy (Board One), Charles Kalme (Board Two), Ray Weinstein (Board Three), and Anthony Saidy (Board Four). Here is a selection of their seventeen best games from the event, most annotated.

Game One:

Josef Marsalek - William James Lombardy [E25]

7th World Student Team Chess Championship/Leningrad (1) 1960


Opening his notes to this game for Chess Review (November 1960), Hans Kmoch writes: "In this game, Marsalek, whose name is Czech for only 'little marshall, ' launches a vehement sacrificial attack in the style of the big M himself. Nonetheless, Lombardy books the point with superb defense and counter-play."

1. d4 Nf6 2. c4 e6 3. Nc3 Bb4 4. a3 Bxc3+ 5. bxc3 c5

5... Ne4!? Botvinnik-Tal 1960

6. f3 Nc6

6... d5 7. cxd5 Nxd5

7. e4 d6 8. Be3

Kmoch suggests the following protracted Knight maneuver as one way to save the pawn at c4: 8. Ne2 O-O 9. Ng3 b6 10. Be2 Ba6 11. Nf1 Na5 12. Ne3 cxd4 13. cxd4 Rc8 but now Black can switch his focus from the pawn to White's unastled king. For example: 14. Qa4 d5! (14... Qc7 15. Bd2) 15. cxd5 Bxe2 16. Kxe2 exd5 17. e5 Nh5

8... b6

Fortifying the square in front of the doubled pawns. White will have great difficulty keeping the pawn at c4, which can now be attacked by Na5 and Ba6.

9. Bd3 O-O 10. Ne2 Ba6 11. Ng3 Rc8










12. f4!?

Playing now in "gambit style" since the pawn is obviously lost.

12. d5 Ne5 13. Bf4 Nfd7

12... cxd4 13. cxd4 Na5 14. e5 Ne8 15. O-O Bxc4

15... f5!

16. f5 dxe5

16... Bxd3 17. Qxd3 dxe5 18. fxe6 Nc4! (18... Rc7) 19. exf7+ Rxf7

17. fxe6 exd4 18. Bxc4 Rxc4 19. Nf5 fxe6 20. Nh6+

Desperation. But Black must play carefully:

20... gxh6 21. Rxf8+ Kxf8 22. Bxh6+ Ng7 23. Qg4 Rc7 24. Qxe6 Rf7 25. Rc1 Rf6

25... Kg8 26. Bxg7 Kxg7

26. Qc8

26. Qh3!?

26... Rd6 27. Qh3 Nc6 28. Bf4 Re6 29. Qxh7 Qe7 30. h4 Re1+ 31. Rxe1 Qxe1+ 32. Kh2 Ne5 33. Qh8+ Kf7 34. Qd8 Ne6 35. Qd5 Qxh4+ 36. Kg1 Qe1+ 37. Kh2 Qh4+ 38. Kg1 Qxf4 0-1


Game Two:

Gheorghe Mititelu - William James Lombardy [E48]

7th World Student Team Chess Championship/Leningrad (3) 1960


1. d4 Nf6 2. c4 e6 3. Nc3 Bb4 4. e3 O-O 5. Bd3 d5 6. cxd5 exd5 7. Nge2 c6 8. O-O Re8 9. Ng3 Nbd7 10. a3 Bf8 11. e4 dxe4 12. Ngxe4 Nxe4 13. Nxe4 Nf6

White has a very active position to compensate for his isolated d-pawn.

13... Nb6

14. Bg5! Be7 15. Ng3?! h6 16. Be3 Bd6 17. Qd2 Ng4?!

17... Nd5

18. Bf4 Bxf4

18... Nxh2?! 19. Rfe1 Bxf4 20. Rxe8+ Qxe8 21. Re1! Qd8 22. Qxf4 Ng4 23. Bc4!

19. Qxf4 Qf6 20. Rae1 Rxe1 21. Rxe1 Be6 22. Nf5 h5 23. h3 Bxf5 24. Bxf5 Nh6 25. Re5 Rd8! 26. g4 hxg4 27. hxg4 Nxf5 28. gxf5 g5 29. Qe3 Kg7 30. Kf1 Rh8 31. Ke2 Rh4 32. Kd3










32... Rf4!

The weak f-pawn must fall.

33. b4 Rxf5 34. Rxf5 Qxf5+ 35. Kc3 g4 36. Kd2 Kg6 37. Qg3 Kg5!

Black effectively uses his King and the threat of forcing an exchange to snag more material.

38. Ke3 Qe6+ 39. Kd2 Qa2+ 40. Ke1 Qa1+ 41. Ke2 Qxd4 42. Qb8 Qc4+ 43. Ke1 b5 44. Qxa7 Kf5 45. Qc7 Ke4 46. Kd2 Qd5+ 47. Ke2 Kd4 48. Qa7+ Kc3 49. a4 bxa4 0-1


Game Three:

William James Lombardy - Burkhard Malich [A21]

7th World Student Team Chess Championship/Leningrad (8) 1960


1. c4 g6 2. g3 Bg7 3. Bg2 e5 4. Nc3 d6 5. e4

Some people call this system "The Botvinnik Attack." White's idea is to first control the light squares and close the position with the idea of next fighting for the dark squares with either an f4 or b4 advance.

5... Nc6 6. Nge2 Nge7 7. d3 O-O 8. O-O Be6 9. Nd5

Taking this outpost is often a useful prelude to action since Black cannot happily capture at d5. The Knight demonstrates how White's light square control becomes the means of dark square attack.

9... Qd7 10. Bg5

Probing the dark squares and inviting Black's response.

10. Be3 Nd4!

10... f6?!

Better 10... f5 11. Qd2

11. Be3 f5 12. b4










12... a6

It is worth noting that Black cannot safely win material here:

a) 12... Bxd5 13. cxd5 Nxb4?! 14. Rb1 (14. Qb3?! a5 15. a3 Na6 16. Qxb7?? Rfb8) 14... c5 15. dxc6 Nbxc6 16. Qb3+ Rf7 17. Qxb7

b) 12... f4 13. gxf4 exf4?! (13... Nd4!?) 14. Nexf4! Bxa1? 15. Qxa1 Bxd5 16. Bh3! Qe8 17. cxd5

13. Rc1 Kh8 14. Qd2 Rf7 15. a4! Raf8 16. b5 axb5 17. cxb5!

The point of Rc1. We are always told to capture toward the center, but this way is justified by White's pressure on the c-file.

17... Bxd5

17... f4? 18. Bxf4 (18. bxc6 fxe3!) 18... exf4 19. bxc6 Nxc6 20. Ndxf4

18. exd5 Nd8 19. f4!

Necessary in order to blunt Black's kingside initiative.

19... b6 20. Rc4 Nc8

20... Nb7 21. Qc2 (21. Rfc1!? Nc5 22. fxe5 Nb3 23. e6! is also good.) 21... Rc8 (21... Nc5 22. fxe5 dxe5 (22... Bxe5?? 23. d4) 23. Bxc5) 22. Rc1 Nc5 23. fxe5 dxe5 24. Bxc5 bxc5 25. Rxc5

21. Rfc1 exf4 22. Nxf4 Re8










23. Bf2

Winning more quickly is 23. Qf2!! threatening Bxb6 or Rxc7 with a powerful queenside breakthrough, for example: 23... Rfe7 24. Rxc7 Qxc7 25. Rxc7 Rxc7 26. Bxb6 Rc1+ 27. Bf1 and White's connected passed pawns are unstoppable: 27... Rb1 (27... Nb7 28. Ne6) (27... Nxb6 28. Qxb6 g5 29. Ne2) (27... Ree1 28. Bxd8) 28. Bxd8 Rxd8 29. Ne6 Re8 30. Qc2

23... Rfe7 24. R1c2 Be5 25. h4!?

25. Qc1! gives White "Alekhine's Gun," which is an unstoppable weapon. 25... Bxf4 (25... c5 26. dxc6 Qa7 27. Nd5) 26. gxf4 c5 27. dxc6 Qa7 28. Qa1+

25... Kg7 26. Rxc7!?

Not the strongest breakthrough plan, but still winning, and more proof that White's position is simply overwhelming at this point.

26. Qc1!

26... Qxc7 27. Rxc7 Rxc7 28. Ne6+ Nxe6 29. dxe6 Ree7

29... Rxe6 30. a5! bxa5 31. b6 Nxb6 32. Bxb6

30. Bd5! Ra7 31. Qa2 Rec7 32. Bc6!

Denying Black all counterplay.

32... Ra5 33. Be1 Bd4+ 34. Kg2 Raa7 35. Qc4 Bf6 36. a5! Re7

36... bxa5 37. Bf2 Rab7 38. Qd5!

37. a6!?

White can win any way he pleases.

37. Bd7! simply picks up a piece.

37... Rac7 38. Bf2 h6 39. Qd5 Bc3 40. h5!?

Switching to the kingside.

40... Be5 41. Bd4 Bxd4

Black resigns rather than see somehting like 42.Qxd4+ Kh7 43.Qf6 gxh5 44.Qxf5+ (44.Bd7!?) 44...Kg7 45.Be4 and White has too many threats.

1-0

Game Four:

Hannu Keto - William James Lombardy [A21]

7th World Student Team Chess Championship/Leningrad (11) 1960


1. c4 e5 2. Nc3 d6 3. g3 f5 4. Bg2 Nf6 5. e3 Be7 6. Nge2 O-O 7. d3 Kh8 8. Rb1 Qe8 9. b4 Nc6

Black's Dutch-style set-up is solid and allows a natural kingside initiative to counter White's queenside pressure.

10. Nd5 Nxd5 11. cxd5 Nd8 12. O-O Bd7 13. f4 Bf6 14. Qd2

14. fxe5 Bxe5 15. Nf4 c6

14... Nf7

14... e4?! 15. dxe4 fxe4 16. Nc3 makes Black's pawns too static and creates a natural target at e4 for White.

15. e4 Nh6!? 16. Bb2










16... Qh5!

Black's plan is a direct kingside assault!

17. fxe5 dxe5 18. Bc1 Rf7 19. Nc3 f4! 20. Bf3 Bg4! 21. Qg2 fxg3 22. hxg3 Bg5! 23. Bxg4 Rxf1+! 24. Qxf1

24. Kxf1 Nxg4 25. Kg1 Rf8

24... Nxg4 25. Qe2 Rf8 26. Nd1??

This allows Black a gorgeous concluding shot.

White's only hope lay in 26. Bxg5 Rf2 27. Qxf2 Nxf2 28. Kxf2 Qxg5

 

 

26... Rf1+!!

 

0-1


Game Five:

Boris V Spassky - William James Lombardy [B94]

7th World Student Team Chess Championship/Leningrad (13) 1960


1. e4 c5 2. Nf3 d6 3. d4 cxd4 4. Nxd4 Nf6 5. Nc3 a6 6. Bg5 Nbd7 7. Bc4 Qa5 8. Qd2 e6 9. O-O

9. O-O-O b5

9... Be7 10. a3

10. h3 h6 11. Be3 Ne5 12. Bb3 b5 13. a3 (13. f4 b4!) 13... Bb7 14. f4 Nc4 15. Bxc4 bxc4 16. Rae1 O-O-O!? Kmoch(16... O-O 17. Nd5 Qd8) (16... Qc7) 17. b4!? (17. Nd5?! Qxd2 18. Nxe7+ Kd7 19. Bxd2 Kxe7)

10... h6 11. Be3

11. Bh4? Nxe4!

11... Ne5 12. Ba2 Qc7

12... b5 13. f4

13. Qe2

13. h3 Nc4

13... b5 14. f4 Neg4 15. h3 Nxe3 16. Qxe3 O-O










17. Rae1

a) Lombardy had calculated 17. e5?! dxe5 18. fxe5 Nd7 19. Rxf7? Rxf7 20. Bxe6 Qxe5 21. Bxf7+ Kxf7 22. Qf3+ Nf6 23. Qxa8 Qxd4+

b) 17. f5?! e5 18. Nf3 (18. Nb3 Bb7) 18... d5!

c) 17. Kh1 Bb7 18. f5 e5 19. Nde2 a5! Kmoch

17... e5! 18. Nf5 Bxf5 19. exf5

 

 

19... d5!

Taking cont rol of the center thanks to tactical threats, including ...Bc5 pinning the Queen and ...d4 forking Queen and Knight.

20. Qxe5?

White feels obliged to take one of the pawns or risk getting pushed back by their advance. But this allows Black tremendous activity.

a) 20. Qd2 exf4! (20... d4!?) 21. Nxd5 (21. Qxf4 Bc5+ 22. Kh1 Qxf4 23. Rxf4 Rfe8) 21... Nxd5 22. Bxd5 Rad8 (22... Bc5+!? 23. Kh1 Be3) 23. Kh1 Bf6 24. c3 Qc5 25. Rd1 Rfe8

b) 20. Kh2! Lombardy 20... d4 21. Qxe5 Qxe5 (21... Bd6 22. Qxd4) 22. fxe5 dxc3 23. exf6 Bxf6 and Black will have great difficulties trying to win the Bishops of opposite color ending.

20... Bd6 21. Qe2 Bxa3! 22. Nd1?

a) 22. bxa3 Qxc3

b) 22. Nxd5 is relatively best: 22... Qc5+ (22... Qa7+!?) 23. Kh1 Bxb2

c) 22. Nxb5? Bc5+

22... Rae8 23. Qf3?

Necessary was 23. Qd2 Rxe1 24. Rxe1 (24. Qxe1 Qxc2) 24... Bc5+ 25. Kh1 Ne4 26. Qxd5 Ng3+ 27. Kh2 Qxf4 28. Qe5 Nf1+ 29. Kh1 Qxf5! and Black wins only a pawn, e.g.: 30. Qxf5 Ng3+ 31. Kh2 Nxf5 32. Rf1 (32. Re5?? Bd6) 32... g6 though it is sufficient to win.

23... Bc5+ 24. Kh1 Rxe1 25. Rxe1










25... Qa5!

A surprising fork, which Spassky must have overlooked. Black must win a piece.

26. Nc3 b4

Not 26... d4?! 27. Ra1! and the threat of Bxf7+ saves the piece.

ChessBase mistakenly gives here 26... Bb4?

27. Nxd5 Qxa2 28. Nxf6+ gxf6 29. Qc6 Qc4

White resigns since he is down a full piece and it is his own King most likely to be in trouble following 30.Qxf6 Qxf4 threatening ...Bd6 etc.

0-1

Game Six:

Charles I Kalme - Josef Augustin [A08]

7th World Student Team Chess Championship/Leningrad (1) 1960


1. Nf3 Nf6 2. g3 d5 3. Bg2 c5 4. O-O Nc6 5. d3 e6 6. Nbd2 Be7 7. e4 a6 8. Qe2 O-O 9. Re1 Qc7 10. Nf1 d4 11. h3 e5 12. N3h2 Ne8 13. f4 f6 14. f5 b5 15. h4 Nd6 16. g4 c4 17. g5 Rd8 18. Qh5 Ne8 19. Ng4 Bf8 20. Nfh2 Nb4 21. g6 h6 22. Nxh6+ gxh6 23. Ng4 Nxc2 24. Bxh6 Bg7 25. Rec1 Nxa1 26. Bd2 Bf8?










26... Ra7 27. Bb4 Nd6 28. Qh7+ Kf8 29. Nh6!? (29. h5 a5 30. Bxd6+ Rxd6 31. Nh6) 29... Bxh6 30. Qh8+ Ke7 31. Qxh6

27. Ba5! Qg7 28. Bxd8 Bxf5 29. Qxf5 Rxd8 30. Rxa1 Qe7 31. Bh3 c3 32. Qh5 Bg7?










32... cxb2 33. Rb1

33. Qh7+ Kf8 34. Nh6! Qc5

34... Bxh6?? 35. Qh8#

34... Qc7 35. Qg8+ Ke7 36. Nf5+ Kd7 37. Nxg7+

35. Qg8+ Ke7 36. Nf5+ Kd7 37. Nxg7+ 1-0


Game Seven:

Charles I Kalme - Dolfi Drimer [A08]

7th World Student Team Chess Championship/Leningrad (3) 1960


1. Nf3 Nf6 2. g3 d5 3. Bg2 e6 4. O-O Be7 5. d3 O-O 6. Nbd2 c5 7. e4 Nc6 8. Qe2 b6 9. Re1 a5 10. e5 Nd7 11. Bh3 b5 12. Bg4 c4 13. d4 b4 14. Nf1 a4 15. Bf4 a3 16. b3 Ba6 17. Qd2 Qb6 18. Ne3 cxb3 19. cxb3 Ra7 20. Rac1 Rc8 21. Rc2 Rac7

 

 

22. Nxd5!! exd5 23. e6 fxe6

23... Nf6 24. exf7+ Kf8 (24... Kxf7 25. Ng5+ Ke8 (25... Kg8 26. Be6+ Kf8 27. Bxc8 Rxc8 28. Qe3) (25... Kf8 26. Ne6+ Kg8 27. Bxc7) 26. Bxc8 Rxc8 27. Bd6) (24... Kh8 25. Bxc7 Qxc7 (25... Rxc7 26. Rxe7) 26. Bxc8) 25. Ng5 (25. Bf5!?) 25... Nxg4 26. Ne6+ Kxf7 27. Bxc7 Qb7 28. Qf4+ Nf6 29. Ng5+ Kg8 (29... Kf8 30. Bd6) 30. Rxc6 Qxc6 31. Rxe7 Qc2 32. h3 and it appears that White is winning.

24. Bxc7 Qxc7?

24... Rxc7 25. Bxe6+ Kf8 (25... Kh8? 26. Bxd5 Ndb8 27. Qf4!) 26. Qf4+! Nf6 27. Bxd5 Bd3 28. Rcc1 Bb5 29. Ng5 and White has winning threats all over the board.

25. Rxe6

25. Bxe6+! Kh8 26. Bxd5

25... Ndb8 26. Qe3 Rf8

26... Qb7 27. Ne5

26... Qd8 27. Rexc6

27. Rexc6 Qa7 28. Rc7 1-0


Game Eight:

Charles I Kalme - Ken Lloyd [A24]

7th World Student Team Chess Championship/Leningrad (5) 1960


1. Nf3 Nf6 2. g3 g6 3. Bg2 Bg7 4. O-O O-O 5. c4 c5 6. Nc3 d6 7. Rb1 Bf5 8. d3 Qd7 9. Re1 Nc6 10. a3 Bh3 11. Bh1 h6 12. b4 Nh5 13. Na4 b6 14. Bb2 Rac8 15. Bxg7 Kxg7 16. e3 f5!?

The beginning of a potentially dangerous kingside initiative.

17. d4!

"The best counter to a demonstration on the flank is an attack in the center."

17... cxb4 18. axb4 f4!? 19. exf4 Nxf4










20. d5!

20. gxf4?? Qg4+ 21. Bg2 Qxg2#

20... Nd8 21. Nb2 e5 22. dxe6 Ndxe6 23. Nd3

Choosing the safest path. Black's weak d-pawn guarantees White a long term plus once he can dampen Black's kingside ambitions.

23... Nxd3

23... Rxc4? 24. Nde5

24. Qxd3 Qf7

24... Bf5 25. Qc3+

25. Rb2 Bf5 26. Qxd6 Rfd8 27. Qe5+ Qf6 28. Ra2 Qxe5 29. Nxe5

White is simply up a pawn and has already targetted the next victim at a7.

29... Rc7 30. Bd5 Nd4 31. Rea1 Kf6 32. f4 a5 33. bxa5 Nb3 34. axb6 0-1


Game Nine:

Charles I Kalme - S. Momo [E06]

7th World Student Team Chess Championship/Leningrad (7) 1960


1. d4 Nf6 2. c4 e6 3. Nf3 d5 4. g3 Be7 5. Bg2 O-O 6. O-O c6 7. Nbd2 Nbd7 8. b3 Re8 9. Bb2 Bd6 10. Rc1

10. Ne5 Qc7 11. f4

10... Nf8 11. Qc2 Ng6 12. e4 dxe4 13. Nxe4 Nxe4 14. Qxe4 Be7 15. Rfd1 Bf6 16. Ne5 Bd7 17. h4! Qc7 18. h5 Nxe5 19. dxe5 Be7 20. c5!

Stops Black from playing ...c5 and ...Bc6.

20... Red8 21. Bf1 Be8 22. Bd3 g6 23. hxg6 hxg6 24. Kg2! Rd5 25. Rh1 Bf8 26. Bc4 Rd2 27. Bc3 Rd7

27... Rxa2? 28. Qb1 Ra3 29. Bb4

28. Rh3 Bg7 29. Rch1 Qd8 30. Qf4 Rd1 31. R1h2 b5










32. Qf6!! Qxf6 33. exf6 Rc1 34. Rh7 1-0


Game Ten:

Charles I Kalme - Hjuverinen [A26]

7th World Student Team Chess Championship/Leningrad (11) 1960


1. c4 Nf6 2. g3 g6 3. Bg2 Bg7 4. Nc3 O-O 5. e4 e5 6. Nge2 d6 7. O-O Nc6 8. Rb1!? a5 9. a3 Nh5 10. b4 axb4 11. axb4 f5 12. b5 Ne7 13. d4 f4! 14. gxf4 exf4 15. Bf3 Bh3 16. Re1 Nf5?

16... Qe8!?

17. exf5 Qg5+ 18. Kh1 Rxf5

 

 

19. Ng3!

Squelching the attack completely.

19... Nxg3+ 20. fxg3 Qh6 21. Nd5 Kh8 22. Nxf4 g5 23. Nxh3 1-0


Game Eleven:

Charles I Kalme - Aleksander S Nikitin [D73]

7th World Student Team Chess Championship/Leningrad (13) 1960


1. Nf3 d5 2. g3 g6 3. Bg2 Bg7 4. d4 Nf6 5. c4 dxc4 6. O-O Nfd7 7. Na3 Nb6 8. e3 O-O 9. Qe2 Nc6 10. Nxc4 Nxc4 11. Qxc4 e5 12. d5 Ne7 13. Rd1 c6 14. d6 Be6 15. Qc5 Nd5 16. e4 Qb6 17. Qa3 Nb4 18. Be3 Nc2 19. Bxb6 Nxa3 20. Bc7 Nb5 21. Ng5 Bg4 22. Bf3 Bd7 23. a4 Nd4 24. Bg2 Bg4 25. f3 Bd7 26. Rxd4 exd4 27. f4 Rac8 28. e5 Rxc7 29. dxc7 Rc8 30. Rd1 Rxc7 31. Rxd4 c5 32. Rd2 h6 33. Ne4 Bxa4 34. Rd8+ Kh7 35. Nd6 Bc6 36. Bf1 b5 37. Bxb5 Bxb5 38. Nxb5 Re7 39. Nc3 Rb7 40. Ne4 g5 41. Nxc5 Rxb2 42. Rd7 gxf4 43. gxf4 Kg6 44. Rxa7 Rb4 45. Nd3 Rd4 46. Ra3 Kf5 47. Kf2 Ke4 48. Nc1 Rc4 49. Ne2 Bf8 50. Re3+ Kf5 51. Kf3 Be7 52. Ng3+ Ke6 53. Rb3 Bb4 54. Rb2 f6 55. exf6 Kxf6 56. Ra2 Rc6 57. Kg4 Bd6 58. Rd2 Ke6 59. Nf5 h5+ 60. Kg5 Be7+ 61. Kg6 Bf6 62. Re2+ Kd5 63. Kxh5 Ra6 64. Ne7+ Kd4 65. Ng6 Kd3 66. Re8 Ra2 67. h4 Rf2 68. Kg4 Rg2+ 69. Kf5 Bc3 70. h5 Rh2 71. Ne5+ Bxe5 72. Rxe5 Rxh5+ 73. Kg6 Rh1 74. f5 Kd4 75. Ra5 1-0


Game Twelve:

Lubomir Kavalek - Raymond Allen Weinstein [B98]

7th World Student Team Chess Championship/Leningrad (1) 1960


1. e4 c5 2. Nf3 d6 3. d4 cxd4 4. Nxd4 Nf6 5. Nc3 a6 6. Bg5 e6 7. f4 h6 8. Bh4 Be7 9. Qf3 Nbd7 10. O-O-O Qc7 11. Bd3 Rb8 12. Rhe1 g5! 13. fxg5 Ne5 14. Qe2 Nfg4 15. h3 hxg5 16. Bg3 Nf6 17. Nf3 Nh5 18. Nxe5 dxe5

18... Nxg3 19. Qf3 dxe5 20. Qxg3 b5 21. Rf1 f6

19. Qf3 b5 20. Rf1 Nf4 21. Bxf4 exf4 22. e5!? Qxe5

22... b4

23. Rfe1 Qc7 24. Re2 Bb7 25. Be4 Kf8 26. Red2 f5 27. Bxb7 Rxb7 28. Re1 b4 29. Ne2 Bf6 30. Nd4 Bxd4 31. Rxd4 Kf7 32. Rd6 Rb6

32... Qxd6 33. Qxb7+ Kf6

33. Rxb6 Qxb6 34. Kb1 a5 35. Qd3 Re8 36. Qc4 Re7 37. b3 Qf2 38. Re2 Qf1+ 39. Kb2 f3 40. gxf3 Qxf3 41. Re5 Qxh3 42. Rxa5 Qc3+ 43. Qxc3 bxc3+ 44. Kxc3










44... Rd7! 45. Ra4 g4 46. Rd4 Ra7!

Things would get very complicated after 46... Rxd4? 47. Kxd4 e5+ and the po sition is reminiscent of the famous Russian exercise where each side has three pawns (at a2, b2, and c2 for White and f7, g7, and h7 fo Black, with the White King at g1 and the Black King at b1). I think White's King stops the pawns after 48. Ke3 f4+ 49. Kf2 e4? 50. a4! e3+ 51. Ke2 Ke6 52. a5! Kd5 53. a6 Kc6 54. b4 and White may actually win this one!!

47. Kd2 Rxa2 48. Ra4? Rxa4 49. bxa4 Ke7 50. Ke3 Kd6 0-1


Game Thirteen:

Iuliu Szabo - Raymond Allen Weinstein [B94]

7th World Student Team Chess Championship/Leningrad (3) 1960


1. e4 c5 2. Nf3 d6 3. d4 cxd4 4. Nxd4 Nf6 5. Nc3 a6 6. Bg5 Nbd7 7. Bc4 Qa5 8. Qd2 e6 9. O-O-O b5 10. Bb3 Bb7 11. Rhe1 O-O-O 12. f3 Be7 13. a3 Kb8 14. Be3 Rc8 15. Kb1 Rhd8 16. Ba2 Ne5 17. Nb3 Qc7 18. Qd4 Nc6 19. Qb6 Nd7 20. Qxc7+ Kxc7 21. Nd4 Nxd4 22. Bxd4 g5 23. Ne2 g4! 24. c4 gxf3 25. gxf3 Ne5 26. Bxe5 dxe5 27. cxb5 axb5 28. Nc3 Bc6 29. b4 Rxd1+ 30. Rxd1 Rg8!

Black has a clear edge due to his two Bishops and more active pieces.

31. Rc1 Kb6 32. Bb3 h5 33. Bd1 h4 34. Be2 Rg2 35. Rh1

35. h3 Rh2 36. Bf1 Bg5 37. Rd1 Bd2 38. Ne2 Rf2

35... f5 36. Kc1 Bg5+ 37. Kd1 Be3 38. a4 bxa4 39. b5 Bd7 40. Nxa4+ Ka5 41. Nb2 Bxb5 42. Nc4+ Kb4 43. Nxe3 Rxe2 44. Re1 Ra2 45. Nc2+ Kc4 46. Kc1 Ba4 47. Ne3+ Kd3 48. Kb1










48... Re2 49. Rxe2 Kxe2 50. Nc4 Kxf3 51. exf5 exf5 52. Nxe5+ Kg2 53. Ng6 0-1


Game Fourteen:

Raymond Allen Weinstein - Dieter Bertholdt [E54]

7th World Student Team Chess Championship/Leningrad (8) 1960


1. d4 Nf6 2. c4 e6 3. Nc3 Bb4 4. e3 c5 5. Bd3 O-O 6. Nf3 d5 7. O-O dxc4 8. Bxc4 b6 9. Qe2 Bb7 10. dxc5 Bxc5 11. e4 Nbd7 12. Bg5 Qb8 13. Kh1 a6 14. Rad1 b5 15. Bb3 Bd6 16. Bc2 Bf4 17. Rd4 Bc6 18. Bxf4 Qxf4 19. Nd5 exd5 20. exd5 Qd6 21. dxc6 Qxc6 22. Qd2 Rae8 23. Rc1 Qb7 24. Qf4 Re7 25. h3 Rfe8 26. Bb3 Re4?! 27. Rxe4 Rxe4 28. Qd6 Ne8 29. Qc6 Qxc6 30. Rxc6 h6 31. Rxa6 Nc5 32. Bd5! Re2 33. Ra8 Kh7 34. Bxf7 Nd6 35. Bg8+ Kg6 36. Rf8! Nd3

The remaining moves very likely were made in time pressure as the players neared the control.

37. Kg1 Ne4?!

37... Nxb2?! 38. Nh4+ Kg5 39. g3 h5 40. f4+ Kh6 41. Bc4 Re1+ 42. Kf2 Re8 43. Rxe8 Nxe8 44. Bxb5

37... Rxb2? 38. Rd8

37... Nc5 38. b4 Ne6 39. Bxe6 Rxe6 40. Rb8

38. Re8?!

38. Bf7+! Kh7 (38... Kf6 39. Bc4+ Ke7 40. Rf7+ Ke8 41. Bxd3) 39. Nh4 Re1+ 40. Kh2 Ne5 41. Bg8+ Kh8 42. f4 g5 43. Bb3+ Kg7 44. Rg8+ Kh7 45. Re8 Ng6 46. Nxg6 Kxg6 47. Bc2

38... Ndxf2?

38... Nf4!

39. Bd5?!

39. Re6+!

39... Kf6??










40. Re6+ Kf5 41. Nd4+ 1-0


Game Fifteen:

Raymond Allen Weinstein - Clement [E11]

7th World Student Team Chess Championship/Leningrad (10) 1960


1. d4 Nf6 2. c4 e6 3. Nf3 Bb4+ 4. Nbd2 O-O 5. e3 b6 6. Bd3 Bb7 7. O-O d5 8. b3 Nbd7 9. Bb2 Rc8 10. Rc1

10. a3 Be7 11. Rc1 c5

10... Qe7 11. Qe2 Ne4 12. Rfd1 Ba3 13. Bxa3 Qxa3 14. cxd5 exd5 15. Nb1 Qd6 16. Nc3! Nxc3

16... c5 17. dxc5 Ndxc5 18. Bxe4

17. Rxc3 c6 18. h3 Nf6 19. Rdc1 Ne4 20. Bxe4 dxe4 21. Nd2 Qe6 22. Qc4 Rfe8 23. Qxe6 Rxe6 24. d5 Rd6 25. dxc6 Rdxc6 26. Nxe4 Kf8 27. Rxc6 Rxc6 28. Rxc6 Bxc6 29. Nc3 Ke7

This is one of those positions you should practice winning against your computer. But first let's see Weinstein do it.

30. f3 Kd6 31. b4 f5 32. Kf2 Ke5 33. f4+! Ke6 34. g3 g6 35. e4! fxe4

35... Bxe4 36. Nxe4 fxe4 37. Ke3 Kd5 38. g4

36. Ke3 h6 37. g4 Bd7 38. Nxe4 Bb5 39. Kd4 Bf1










40. f5+! gxf5 41. gxf5+ Kd7 42. h4 a5 43. a3 Ke7 44. Ke5 axb4 45. axb4 Bd3 46. Nd6 b5 47. f6+ Kf8 48. Nf5 h5 49. Ng3 Bg6 50. Kf4 Kg8 51. Kg5

Winning another pawn.

51... Kf7 52. Nf5 Bh7 53. Nd6+ Kf8 54. Nxb5 1-0


Game Sixteen:

Anthony Fred Saidy - Rolf Martens [A59]

7th World Student Team Chess Championship/Leningrad (2) 1960


1. d4 Nf6 2. c4 c5 3. d5 b5 4. cxb5 a6 5. bxa6 Bxa6 6. Nc3 g6 7. Nf3 Bg7 8. e4 Bxf1 9. Kxf1 d6 10. g3 O-O 11. Kg2 Na6 12. Nd2 Qc7 13. Nc4 Rfb8 14. Re1 Nd7 15. a3 Ne5 16. Qe2 Nxc4 17. Qxc4 Qb7 18. Nd1 Qb5

18... Nc7 19. Be3 Nb5 20. h4 Nd4

19. Qxb5 Rxb5 20. Re2 Rab8 21. Rc2 Nc7 22. Ra2 Rb3 23. Nc3 Ra8 24. a4 Rb4 25. f3 Bxc3 26. bxc3 Rbxa4 27. Rxa4 Rxa4 28. Rb2 Ra8

Black has won back his pawn, but White's initiative is worth more.

28... Ra1 29. Bh6

29. Rb7 Rc8 30. c4 f6 31. f4 Kf7 32. Bb2 Na6

32... Ne8 33. Kf3 Ra8 34. Ke3 (34. e5 Ra4) 34... Ra4 35. Kd3

33. Bc3 Rb8 34. Ra7 Rb3?

34... Nb4 35. e5 fxe5 36. fxe5 dxe5 37. Bxe5 Rb6 38. Kf3

35. Ba5!

White's pieces now combine to win a pawn.

35... Nb4 36. Bd8 Ke8 37. Bxe7 Rc3 38. Bxd6 Rxc4 39. Kf3

White wins faster with the immediate 39. e5!

39... Rc3+ 40. Kg2 f5 41. e5 Nxd5 42. e6 Nb6 43. Rxh7

and mate is unavoidable.

1-0

Game Seventeen:

Anthony Fred Saidy - Florin Gheorghiu [E93]

7th World Student Team Chess Championship/Leningrad (3) 1960


1. d4 Nf6 2. c4 g6 3. Nc3 Bg7 4. e4 d6 5. Be2 O-O 6. Nf3 e5 7. d5 Nbd7 8. Bg5 h6 9. Bh4 g5 10. Bg3 Nh5 11. Nd2 Nf4 12. O-O Nc5 13. Nb3 b6 14. Re1 Nxe2+ 15. Qxe2 f5 16. exf5 Bxf5 17. Nxc5 bxc5 18. Rac1 Qf6 19. Ne4 Qg6 20. h3 Rab8 21. b3 Rf7 22. Rb1 h5 23. h4 gxh4 24. Bxh4 Bh6 25. f3 Rbf8

Gheorghiu now has an overwhelming attacking formation.

26. Kh1 Rg7 27. g3 Bc8 28. b4 Rgf7 29. bxc5 Rxf3 30. Rb8 Qg4 31. Rxc8

Desperation, but White has no better since Black's attack is overwhelming:

a) 31. Nf6+ R8xf6! 32. Bxf6 Be3!! (32... Qh3+ 33. Qh2 Rf1+ 34. Rxf1 Qxf1+ 35. Qg1 Qh3+ only draws.) 33. Qh2 (33. Rxc8+ Qxc8!) 33... Rxg3 34. Rxc8+ Kf7 35. Rxc7+ Kxf6 36. Rf1+ Bf4

b) 31. Qg2 Be3 32. Nf6+ R8xf6

31... Qxc8 32. Kg2

32. Qg2 Be3!

32... Qf5! 33. cxd6

Black now embarks on a series of attacking moves which basically sweep up all of White's major pieces. Unfortunately for Gheorgiu, however, he forgets to reapture this lowly pawn....

33... Re3!

Wins at least a piece, which will leave Black up a full Rook.

34. Qxe3 Bxe3 35. Rxe3 Qf1+ 36. Kh2 Rf2+?

Black likely was in time pressure.

36... cxd6!

37. Nxf2 Qxf2+ 38. Kh3 Qxe3??










Black is still winning after 38... cxd6

39. d7! Qf3 40. d8=Q+ Kh7 41. Qe7+ Kg8 42. Qe6+ Kh7 43. Qe7+ 1-0

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