John Moldovan (1774) - Stephen E Stoyko (2326) [D36]

Kenilworth Chess Club Championship, Open Section/Kenilworth, NJ USA (1) 2006


1. Nf3 Nf6 2. c4 e6 3. Nc3 d5 4. cxd5 exd5 5. d4 c6 6. Bg5 Be7 7. Qc2 O-O 8. e3 Re8 9. Bd3 Nbd7 10. h3

10. O-O-O : a. 10. ..Nf8 11. Ne5 Ng4 12. Bxe7 Qxe7 13. Nxg4 (13. Nf3 += F) 13... Bxg4 14. Rde1 Bh5 15. Bf5 Bg6 16. g4 a5 17. h4 = Moldovan - Jason Cohen : Kenilworth Swiss 10/13/1990; b. 10... h6 11. Bf4 Nf8 12. h3 Be6 13. g4 b5? (13. .. Bb4 += F) 14. g5 hxg5 15. Bxg5? (15. Nxg5 +/- F) 15... Qc8? 16. Rdg1 +/- Bxh3?? 17. Bh6 +- Nh5 18. Ne5 b4 19. Qe2 bxc3 20. Qxh5 cxb2+ 21. Kb1 1-0 Moldovan - chrisvantielt : e-mail game, It's Your Turn 2004

 

10... Nf8 11. O-O-O

Better is 11.O-O. S

 

11... a5 Better is 11... Be6. S

 

12. Ne5 N6d7 13. Bxe7

Better is 13. Bf4. S

 

13... Qxe7 14. Nxd7 Bxd7 15. Kb1 Be6N

Better is 15...b5 = Scammon - Avant : IECG email 1999.

 

16. Rhg1!?

A waiting move. I also considered 16. Na4 & 16. Rc1

 

16... f6? 16... Rac8 += F 17. g4 Bf7 18. h4 Bg6 19. Rg3?

Much better is 19. Bf5 S which F thinks is +/-. 19. Bf5!+/-

 

19... Bxd3 20. Qxd3 Qf7 21. Rdg1 Qg6 22. Qxg6

Better is 22. Qf5. S 22. Qf5!+/=

 

22... Nxg6 23. g5 f5 24. h5 Ne7

24...f4 is refuted by 25.Rf3! S

 

25. Ne2 Nc8 26. Nf4 Nd6 27. Nd3 a4 28. h6?

28. Kc2 += F 28. Kc2!+/=

 

28... g6 29. Rc1 Re7 30. Rgg1 Rf8!

=/+ S; 30... Ne4 = F

 

31. b3?!

Steve claims this gives Black a clear advantage but Fritz thinks White has an edge. 31. Rc2 was an option.

 

31... a3 32. Rc2

32. Nf4 += F 32. Nf4

 

32... Ne4 32... Re4 = F 33. Ne5?

I had played quite well to this point but over the next several moves I ruined my game & a chance to draw the top seed. 33.Nf4 += was right.

 

33... f4 34. f3??

Disasterous. 34. b4!~~

 

34... Nd6-+ 35. exf4 Rxf4 36. Rg4 Rxg4 37. Nxg4 Nb5 38. Ne5?

Loses a piece but the game was beyond salvage.

 

38... Nxd4

Black resigned. Time left - Moldovan 4:49/Stoyko 33:41... Time used - Moldovan 85:11/Stoyko 56:19

0-1

 

[Moldovan, with ideas from Stoyko]


Greg Tomkovich (1718) - Scott Massey (2213) [A85]

Kenilworth Chess Club Championship, Open Section/Kenilworth, NJ USA (1) 2006


1. d4 f5 2. c4 Nf6 3. Nc3 e6 4. g3 Bb4 5. Bd2 O-O 6. Bg2 Qe7 7. e3 c6 8. Nge2 d5

I am trying to prevent Scott from playing f4 as he has done in the past, he counters in the center.

 

9. cxd5 exd5

Taking on the characteristics of the QGD Exchange Variation, where the Minority Attack is the plan.

 

10. O-O Bd6 11. Qc2 Qf7 12. a3 g5!?

I begin a minority attack on the queenside, while Scott prepares f4 on the Kingside. Black seems to be ignoring his queenside development.

 

13. b4 a6 14. Na4 Bc7 15. Nc5 h6

Scott thought he'd be winning after 15... Nbd7 16. Qxf5 Nxc5 17. Qxg5+ , but Fritz points out that it leads to a forced draw after 17... Kh8 18. dxc5 (18. bxc5? actually loses after 18... Rg8 19. Qh4 Rg4 20. Qh6 Ng8-+) 18... Rg8 19. Qh4 Rg4 20. Qh6 Rg6 (20... Ng8? 21. Bc3+) 21. Qh4 Rg4= 1/2-1/2

 

16. a4 Nbd7 17. b5 axb5 18. axb5 Rxa1 19. Rxa1 Nxc5 20. Qxc5 Ne4!

In retrospect, perhaps I should have taken with the pawn! But the fight is still not over even though Black has gained the initiative.

 

21. Qc2 Nxd2 22. Qxd2 f4

Scott plays the move he has been trying for and I have been trying to prevent. This is the critical moment of the game.

 

23. exf4 gxf4 24. gxf4?

The losing move! Scott thought that the game was likely drawn after >= 24. Nxf4 Bxf4 25. Qxf4! Qxf4 26. gxf4 Rxf4 27. Ra8 Rf8 28. bxc6 bxc6=. Now Black is clearly better and takes his time developing his kingside attack.

 

24... Bg4 25. bxc6 bxc6 26. Rc1 Qe6 26... Qg6!? 27. f3 Bh5 28. Kf2 Be8 29. Rg1 29. Qe3!=/+ 29... Kh8 30. Re1 Qf6 31. Qe3 Bg6 31... Qh4+ 32. Ng3 Bxf4-/+ 32. Ng3 Bxf4 33. Qe6 Qxd4+ 34. Kf1 Bxg3 35. hxg3 Bd3+ 36. Re2 Rf6 37. Qe8+ Kg7 38. Qe7+ Rf7 39. Qe6 Ra7 40. Ke1 Ra1+ 41. Kd2 Bf5# 1-0

 

[Tomkovich, with ideas from Massey]


Ari Minkov (1988) - Mark Kernighan (2212) [B52]

Kenilworth Chess Club Championship, Open Section/Kenilworth, NJ USA (1) 2006


1. e4 c5 2. Nf3 d6 3. Bb5+ Bd7 4. Bxd7+ Qxd7 5. O-O Nf6 6. e5!? dxe5 7. Nxe5 Qf5 8. Re1 Nbd7 9. Qf3 Forcing the exchange of Queens with quick equality. 9... Qxf3 10. Nxf3 e6 11. d4?! 11. d3 Bd6 12. a4= 11... cxd4 12. Nxd4 Rc8 12... O-O-O!? 13. c3 Bc5=/+ Black's lead in development gives him a slight initiative. 14. Nb3 Bd6 15. f3 h5 15... Ne5 16. Be3 b6 17. Bd4 Nc4 18. Bxf6 gxf6 19. Re2 Ke7|^ 16. Be3 Bb8 17. N1d2 Ne5 18. Re2 Nd3 19. Nf1 Nf4 20. Rd2 N6d5 21. Bc5 h4 22. Rad1 b5 23. Ne3 a5 24. Nxd5 Nxd5 25. Bd4 a4 26. Nc5 Bf4 27. Rd3 Rh5 27... Rh6! 28. h3 Rg6 28. Ne4! stopping Rg5 28... Kf8 29. Bc5+?! Rxc5! This temporary Exchange sac gives Black the edge. 30. Nxc5 Be3+ 31. Rxe3[] Nxe3 32. Rd3 Nd5 32... Nxg2?? 33. Nd7++- 32... Rxc5 33. Rxe3 a3!? 34. b3 (34. bxa3?! Rc4=/+) 34... b4!? 35. c4 Ke7 36. Rd3= 33. Ne4 Ke7 34. Kf2 Re5?! 34... Nf4=/+ 35. Rd4!? g5 36. c4 bxc4 37. Rxc4 Nf4= Fritz8 says it is now equal. He should say, "Watch out for the trap!" 38. Rxa4?? f5!-+ 39. Ra7+ The Knight has no escape! 39. Nc3 Nd3+ 40. Kf1 Re1# 39. Nd2 Re2+-+ 39. Nxg5 Nd3+ 40. Kf1 Re1# 39... Kf8 40. Ra8+ Kg7 41. Ra7+ Kg6 42. g3 Nd3+ 43. Ke3 fxe4 44. fxe4 Nxb2 45. gxh4 gxh4 and the rest of the score is incomplete, Black won despite extreme time pressure. 0-1

 

[Goeller, based on Kernighan]


Michael Wojcio - Michael Goeller [B06]

Kenilworth Chess Club Championship, Open Section/Kenilworth, NJ USA (1) 2006


1. e4 Nc6 2. Nf3 d6 3. c3!? g6

More usual is 3... Nf6. In our game from the Summer Tournament, Mike had played 4. Qe2?! ( After the game I showed him he does not need to defend the pawn directly due to the idea 4. d4 Nxe4?? 5. d5 Nb8 6. Qa4++- which he has been wanting to spring on someone ever since.) 4... Bg4 5. g3? d5! 6. exd5 Qxd5 7. Bg2 O-O-O 8. d4 e5 9. c4 A blunder, but White is in trouble.(9. h3 exd4! 10. hxg4 Re8 11. Be3 dxe3 12. fxe3 Bc5 gets ugly fast.) 9... Qa5+! ( The strongest way to exploit Black's initiative. Black can also win a pawn by 9... Nxd4 10. cxd5 Nxe2 11. Kxe2 e4 12. Nc3 exf3+ 13. Bxf3 Bxf3+ 14. Kxf3 Nxd5-/+) 10. Bd2 Bb4 11. d5 e4 (11... Nd4! 12. Qd3 Bf5-+) 12. O-O Nd4!? (12... exf3! 13. Bxf3 Bxf3 14. Qxf3 Ne5-+) 13. Nxd4 Bxe2 14. Bxb4 Qxb4 15. Nxe2 Qxb2 (15... Qxc4) 16. Nbc3 Qb4 (16... Rhe8) 17. Nb5 Qxc4 18. Ned4 Qxd5 19. Nxa7+ Kb8 20. Nab5 c6 21. Nxc6+ Qxc6 22. a4 Rd2 23. Rac1 Qb6 24. Nc3 e3 25. Rb1 exf2+ 26. Kh1 Rb2 27. a5 Qb3 28. Rxb2 Qxb2 29. Na4 Qb4 30. Nb6 Qxa5 31. Rb1 Qe1+ 0-1, Wojcio-Goeller, KCC Summer Tournament 2005.

 

4. d4 Bg7 5. Be2

5. d5 Nb8

 

5... Nf6 6. h3!?N

More standard is 6. O-O with similar play.

 

6... O-O

Not 6... Nxe4?? 7. d5 Ne5 8. Qa4++-

 

7. Nbd2 e5

7... Nd7!? 8. O-O e5 9. dxe5 Ndxe5=

 

8. O-O exd4?!

Stoyko thought this was a mistake, surrendering the center. I did not know the standard Modern Defense lines from this position and thought that this was the best way to attack his center. Standard in these type of positions is 8... Nd7 9. dxe5 (9. Nb3 a5=) (9. d5 Ne7 and Black has a lovely King's Indian type position with the natural ...f5 in the offing.) 9... Ndxe5 10. Nxe5 Nxe5 11. f4 Nd7!?=

 

During the game I considered 8... d5 to be perfectly equal and rejected it as a sterile equality. Actually, though, after 9. exd5 Nxd5 10. Nxe5 Nxe5 11. dxe5 Bxe5 12. Nf3+/= White keeps a slight edge since he controls more squares in the center and his pawns at h3 and c3 limit the scope of Black's pieces. 8... Re8 9. Qc2 Nh5!? 10. d5 Ne7 11. Ng5 Nf4 12. Nc4 Nexd5 13. Nxf7 Nxe2+ 14. Qxe2 Nxc3 15. bxc3 Kxf7 16. f4 Kg8 17. fxe5 dxe5 18. Ba3 Be6 19. Rad1 Qh4 20. Nd2 Bf8 21. Nf3 Qg3 22. Bxf8 Rxf8=/+ 1-0 One_i-Redmike/www.playchess.de 2003 (49)

 

9. cxd4

9. Nxd4!? Re8 10. Nxc6 bxc6 11. Bd3 c5 12. Re1 Bb7 13. Qc2 d5 14. e5 Nd7 (14... c4!) 15. f4 c4 16. Bf1 c5 17. Nf3~~ 1-0 beetle-chinaco/Internet Chess Club 1997 (28)

 

9... Re8 10. Bd3 Nd7 11. Nb3

11. d5 Nb4! 12. Bb1 Nc5 13. a3 Nbd3=/+

 

11... a5!?

All part of my plan going into this line. The idea is to induce a4 by White, thus securing the b4 square for my Knight as a permanent base.

 

12. a4

I actually had not even considered the annoying counter-attack 12. Bg5! which interferes with Black's plans. And I doubt I would have considered all of the possibilities Best is likely 12... Nf6 , though it's hard to move a piece back to where it was a minute ago let alone to walk into a pin.

(12... f6!? ugly, but actually effective: 13. Be3 Nb4 (13... d5!? 14. exd5 Nb4 15. d6!+/=) 14. Bb1 (14. Bc4+ d5) 14... d5 15. a3 dxe4~~)

(12... Bf6!? I always th ought you should avoid this exchange and would never have considered it until Stoyko showed me the idea in another line. 13. Bxf6 (13. Be3 Nb4 14. Bb1 a4 15. Nbd2 a3<=>) 13... Qxf6 14. a4 Nb4 15. Bb1 b6=)

13. Re1 h6 14. Bh4 Nb4 15. Bb1 a4 16. Nbd2 g5 17. Bg3 a3! 18. Qb3 Nc6 19. bxa3 (19. e5 Be6! 20. Qxb7?! dxe5 21. dxe5 Bd5!) 19... Nh5 20. Qd3 f5!?=/+

 

12... Nb4 13. Bb1 Nf8

Too passive, but I had started to worry about my kingside and found the plan of ...d5, ...Ne6, ...b6, ...Bb7, and ...c5 attractive. I considered 13... Nb6! for a long time and did not reject it on its own merits. But I did not appreciate its strength: 14. Bg5 f6! (I had only considered 14... Qd7 15. Nbd2 h6 16. Be3 and I did not see anything concrete, but it is a good position for Black.) 15. Bd2 (15. Bf4 d5! 16. Nc5 dxe4 17. Bxe4 N6d5 18. Qb3 Kh8 19. Bd2 c6=) 15... Bd7 16. Nxa5 Rxa5 17. Bxb4 Rxa4~~ 13... d5!? 14. e5 (14. Bg5 f6!-/+) 14... f6 15. exf6 Bxf6!?~~

 

14. Re1 d5 15. e5 b6?!

Why allow Bg5-f6? 15... c6!? 16. Bg5 Qb6 15... Ne6! 16. Bd2 Qe7 17. h4 b6 18. h5 Ba6~~

 

16. Bg5 Qd7 17. Nh2!

Heading for the dark squares via g4.

 

17... Ne6 18. Be3

During the game, I thought White had good and scary attacking chances following 18. Bf6! which had me depressed and made me spend a lot of time calculating crazy possibiities: 18... Bxf6 19. exf6 Ba6 (19... Qd8 20. Ng4 h5 (20... c5 21. Qd2 c4 22. Qh6+-) 21. Nh6+ Kf8 (21... Kh7 22. Qxh5+-) (21... Kh8?? 22. Nxf7++-) 22. Qf3|^) (19... h5 20. Bf5!->) 20. Ng4 (20. Qd2 Bc4 21. Ra3~~) 20... Bc4 21. Ra3|^

 

18... c5 19. f4!?

Mike was blitzing me throughout the game and still had 75 of his 90 minutes left on the clock. I meanwhile had already used all but 30. He did not see half of what I saw (based on our post-mortem) but he still played very reasonable moves and very fast, giving me no chance to assess possibilities on his time. He says he did not even consider 19. dxc5!? while I had spent lots of time making sure I was ok after 19... bxc5 (19... Bxe5!? 20. Ng4! Bxb2 21. Bd4!|^) 20. Ng4! (20. Nxc5? Nxc5 21. Bxc5 Bxe5=/+) 20... h5!? (Fritz improves with 20... c4 21. Nd4 Nxd4 22. Bxd4 Nc6 23. Ra3 Nxd4 24. Qxd4 f5!!-/+) 21. Nh6+ Bxh6 22. Bxh6 Nc6 23. Qd2 c4 24. Nc1 Rb8<=>

 

Perhaps best is 19. Ng4!? with the initiative.

 

19... cxd4?!

I knew that releasing the tension could not be good but I feared f5 coming and wanted to liquidate. Black is actually fine after 19... Qe7! 20. f5? (20. Ng4|^) 20... gxf5 21. Bxf5? (21. Qh5 cxd4 22. Nxd4 Nxd4 23. Bxd4 Nc6 24. Bxb6 Rb8 25. Bf2 Nxe5-/+) 21... Nxd4 22. Bxc8 Nxb3 unclear

 

20. Nxd4 Nxd4 21. Bxd4 Qc6 22. Ra3 Bd7 23. Ree3!? f6

23... Na6 24. Rec3 Nc5

 

24. Rec3 Qe6 25. Ng4 h5?

The losing move. At this point, I had 20 minutes left on the clock and felt more desperate than I needed to be! I was trying for traps to create winning chances. I also miscalculated the consequences, missing two winning ideas for him. Holding is 25... f5 26. Ne3 (26. Nf6+?? Bxf6 27. exf6 Qe1+-+) 26... Rec8 27. g4 and though White has a strong attack there is no immediate win.

 

26. Bxg6!

26. Nxf6+! Bxf6 when both of us missed 27. Rg3!!-> (we both did see 27. exf6? Qe1+-/+) Also possible was 26. f5!?->

 

26... hxg4 27. f5!

I missed this critical in-between move that makes all the difference. From here on out I was playing in a dispirited way with little time on the clock as well. I was hoping for winning chances following 27. Bxe8 Rxe8 28. exf6 Bxf6 29. hxg4 Qe1+ 30. Qxe1 Rxe1+ 31. Kf2 Bxd4+ 32. Kxe1 Bxc3+ 33. Rxc3 d4=/+

 

27... Qe7 28. Bxe8

28. e6

 

28... Rxe8 29. e6 gxh3 30. Bxb6 Bxe6 31. Bc5 Qb7

31... Qc7 32. Bxb4

 

32. fxe6 d4 33. Rxh3 Rxe6 34. Bxd4 Qe4 35. Rae3 Qd5 36. Rxe6 Qxe6 37. Re3 Qd5 38. Qg4! Nc2?! 39. Bxf6!

Mike played well, especially at the end, to take the point.

 

1-0

[Michael Goeller]


Mikhail Kruglyak (1264) - Joe Demetrick (1560) [B10]

Kenilworth Chess Club Championship, U-1800/Kenilworth, NJ USA (1) 2006


1. e4 c6 2. Nc3 2. Nf3!? d5 3. exd5 cxd5 4. Ne5! Apocalypse Attack 2... d5 3. exd5?! 3. d4 3. Nf3 3... cxd5 4. Bb5+ Nc6 5. Qf3?! Nf6 6. Nge2 6. d4 6... Bg4 6... a6 7. Bxc6+ bxc6=/+ 7. Qg3 e6 8. Nd4 8. f3!? Bd6 9. Qh4 Bf5 (9... Bh5 10. d3) 10. Nd4 8... Bd6? 9. Nxc6! bxc6 10. Bxc6+ Kf8 11. f4 11. Qe3 Rc8 12. Ba4= 11... Rc8 12. Bb5 Qb6 13. d4?? 13. Bd3=/+ 13... Rxc3! 14. Qxc3 Qxb5 15. Qd3 15. Qc8+ Ke7 15... Qxd3 16. cxd3-+ Ke7 17. O-O Be2 18. Re1 Bxd3 19. Re3 Be4 20. Ra3?? but White was lost anyway. 20. Rb3 Rc8 20... Bxa3 21. bxa3 Rb8 22. Bd2 Rb1+ 23. Rxb1 Bxb1 24. Bb4+ Kd7 25. h3 Bxa2 26. g4 Ne4 27. Kg2 Kc6 28. h4 g6 29. Kf3 f5 30. h5 Kb5 31. g5 a5 32. Bc5 Kc4!? 0-1

[Fritz8]


Laukik Gadgil - Ted Mann (1485) [C42]

Kenilworth Chess Club Championship, U-1800/Kenilworth, NJ USA (1) 2006


1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 Nf6 3. d3?! too passive. 3. Nxe5 is better 3. d4 is better. 3. Nc3 Bb4!? 3... Nc6 4. c3 d5 5. exd5 Qxd5=/+ 6. Be2 e4? Premature. 6... Bf5-/+ development! 7. dxe4 Qxe4 8. O-O Bd6 9. Re1 9. Nbd2 9... O-O 10. Bb5 Qg6 11. Nh4 Qg4 12. Qxg4 Nxg4 13. Nf3= Nge5 14. Nxe5 Nxe5 15. Bf4? 15. Nd2 is better 15... Nf3+! 16. gxf3 Bxf4-/+ Black has 2 bishops and better pawn structure. 17. Na3 a6 17... Bf5 18. Ba4 b5 19. Bc2 Be6 20. Bb3 Bf5 21. Rad1 Rfe8 22. Nc2 Bg6 23. Nb4 c5 24. Nd5 Rxe1+ 25. Rxe1 Bd2 25... Bd6 is better 26. Ne7+ Kf8 27. Nxg6+ hxg6 28. Rd1 Rd8 29. Kf1 c4 30. Bc2 Ke7 31. Ke2 Bf4 32. Rxd8 Kxd8 33. Be4 Kc7 34. b3 f5 35. Bd5 cxb3 36. axb3 Bxh2 37. Ke3 g5 38. Be6 f4+ 39. Ke2 a5 40. Kf1 Kd6 41. Bg8 g4 42. fxg4 f3 43. Ke1 g5 43... a4 44. bxa4 bxa4 45. Kd2 Be5 46. Kc2 44. Kd2 b4?! now Black has no hope of winning with the opposite colored Bishops. 44... Bf4+ 45. Kd3 a4 46. bxa4 bxa4 47. Ba2 Kc5 48. Ke4 Bd2 49. Kxf3 Bxc3= 45. cxb4 axb4 46. Ke3 Kc5 47. Kxf3 Bf4= Neither player can make progress. 1/2-1/2

[Fritz8]


Selwyn Davis - Bob Pelican [D30]

Kenilworth Chess Club Championship, U-1800/Kenilworth, NJ USA (1) 2006


1. d4 d5 2. c4 e6 3. e3 Nf6 4. Nf3 Be7 5. Nc3 b6 6. Bd3 O-O 7. O-O dxc4 8. Bxc4 Ba6 9. b3 c5 10. e4 Bxc4 11. bxc4 cxd4 12. Nxd4 Bb4 13. Qd3?? Walking into a fatal pin. 13... Nc6 13... e5 14. Ncb5 e5 15. a3 Bc5 16. Bb2 exd4-+ 17. Qf3 Re8 18. Rad1 Qe7 19. Rfe1 a6 20. Nxd4 Nxd4 21. Bxd4 Bxd4 22. Rxd4 Rad8 23. Rdd1 Rxd1 24. Qxd1 Qxa3 25. e5 Qe7 26. Qd4 Nd7 27. f4 Qc5 28. Qxc5 Nxc5 29. Rd1 Rb8 30. f5 Kf8 31. g4 Ke7 32. Kg2 g6 33. f6+ Ke6 34. Rd5 It's almost mate, if only the e-pawn were supported! But not 34. Rd6+? Kxe5-+ 34... Rb7 35. Kf3 Rd7! Forcing off White's last piece and preventing Kf4 and Rd6#! 36. Rxd7 Nxd7 37. Kf4 Nxe5 38. Kg5 a5 39. Kf4 Kxf6 40. h3 Nxc4 41. g5+ Ke6 42. Kg4 a4 43. Kf4 a3 44. Ke4 a2 45. Kd3 b5 46. Kc3 a1=Q+ 47. Kb4 Qa4+ 48. Kc5 Nd6 49. h4 Qc4+ 50. Kb6 b4 51. h5 Qb5+ 52. Kc7 Qb7+ 53. Kd8 Qd7# 0-1

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