Evan Ju Wins the 2006 NJ Open

I have annotated Evan Ju's games from the 60th Annual New Jersey Open Chess Championship 2006, which he won this past Labor Day weekend at the surprising age of fifteen, making him the youngest champion in New Jersey history and the first to hold both the NJ Junior and NJ Open titles. His games tell a story of a young player, only recently of master strength, who showed himself up to the challenge of New Jersey's best players, including some with international titles.

IM Jeremy Silman once wrote, "you always need some luck to win a [chess] tournament," to which Thomas Jefferson might have added, "the harder you work the more luck you'll have." There is no question that Evan was a little lucky in some of his games, but that he also worked very hard to make that luck. When he was not working at creating active winning plans, he was working hard at creating difficulties for his opponent. When all else fails, after all, you can always ask, "What move would I hate to face if I were he?"

In his game with 70-year-old FM Anatoly Volovich in Round 2, Evan was forced into a difficult endgame a piece down. Though we do not have the complete score of this game, several sources tell me that Evan posed the one problem for his opponent that he'd least like to face (and which may be all chess players' nightmare scenario): he eliminated all of the pawns and forced Volovich to try to win with Bishop and Knight against lone King in time pressure! As Jon Edwards writes: "Even many chess experts and masters cringe at the thought of having to mate with only a King, Bishop, and Knight against a lone King," in part because "this checkmate is unforgiving. A single mistake can require that you start over." And since there are some scenarios where, even with perfect play, it could take 30 moves or more to complete the mate, starting over is a nightmare. Some might say Evan was lucky that Volovich had forgotten how to perform this mate (which, I think it is safe to say, the very experienced FM had never encountered in a game in over 60 years of playing). But I think Evan made his luck by creating as many difficulties as possible and by using the clock to his advantage.

Chess is sport, after all. And it is a very difficult one at that. In few of his games did Evan play perfectly, but neither did his generally higher rated opponents. In several games, especially against Rodion Rubenchik (2312) in Round 3 and Emory Tate (2447) in Round 5, the play became tactically wild and very murky. Both players struggled to find the right move, but it was Evan who emerged victorious. Sometimes you have to risk losing in order to win.

I hope you enjoy playing over Evan's games as much as I have enjoyed annotating them. I look forward to next year's event, where I hope Evan will be at the board to defend his title. I plan to be on hand to cover it.

 

Round 1

Alex Palanker (1950) - Evan Ju (2203) [E62]

60th New Jersey Open 2006/Somerset, NJ USA (1) 2006


1. c4 g6 2. Nf3 Bg7 3. Nc3 d6 4. g3 Nf6 5. Bg2 O-O 6. O-O c6 7. Rb1!?

7. d4 would transpose to the King's Indian Defense.

 

7... Qa5!?

Black has had more success playing Evan's idea of exchanging Bishops this way: 7... Bf5 8. d3 Qc8! 9. Re1

(9. Bd2 e5 10. e4 Bh3 11. b4 Bxg2 12. Kxg2 Nbd7 13. b5 Nh5 14. bxc6 bxc6= 15. Rb3?! Nc5 16. Rb1 f5! 17. Be3 Ne6 18. exf5 Rxf5!? 19. g4?! Nhf4+ 20. Kh1 Rf8 21. Nd2? d5! 22. Bxf4 Nxf4 23. cxd5 cxd5 24. Qb3 Qxg4 25. Rg1 Qd7 26. Nce4 Kh8 27. Nc5 Qc6 28. Rgc1 Ne2 29. Qb7? Qxb7 30. Rxb7 Nxc1 31. Ne6 Rxf2 0-1 Goller,S-Koenig/Germany 1992 (31))

9... Bh3 10. Bh1 h6 11. b4 Qg4!? 12. b5 Nbd7 13. bxc6 bxc6 14. Qa4 Rfc8 15. Qa5 Qh5 16. Qxh5 Nxh5= 17. Bd2 Rab8 18. a4 Nc5 19. a5 Nb3! 20. Na4 c5 21. Nb6? Nxd2! 22. Nxc8 Nxb1 0-1 Ennsberger,U-Tseitlin,M/Wattens 1992 (35)

 

8. d3

Black's last move invites 8. b4 when one game continued: 8... Qh5 9. h4!? e5 10. d3 Ne8 11. Nh2! Qf5 12. b5 Qd7 Black's Queen loses time returning home. 13. a4 f5 14. Qb3 Kh8 15. f4!? Nf6 16. e3 Qe7 17. Nf3 Re8 18. c5 Ng4? 19. cxd6 Qxd6 20. Ng5! Nh6 21. bxc6 bxc6 22. Nb5! Qd7 23. Ba3 ( to exploit the weak d6 square. An interesting alternative is 23. fxe5 Bxe5 24. Bb2! which would leave Black's King very exposed.) 23... Na6? (23... exf4 24. Nd6 fxe3 25. Nxe8 Qxe8) 24. Nd6 Rf8 25. Rfc1 (25. fxe5 Bxe5 26. Nc4) 25... Rb8 26. Qc4 Rxb1 27. Rxb1 c5 28. Bxc5 Nxc5 29. Qxc5 exf4 30. Rb8 Ba6? 31. Ndf7+ Nxf7? 32. Rxf8+ 1-0 Korth,M-Kirbach,T/Nuremberg 1990 (32) - it's mate next move.

 

8... Qh5

Though it appears at first aggressively posted, the Queen is ultimately rather misplaced here and White should be able to fend off this premature "two piece attack," as illustrated in the game cited above. Evan's play is characterized by setting difficult tasks for his opponents above all, and he likely thought that his lower-rated opponent would be most uncomfortable defending.

 

 

9. Ng5!?

Threatening to wall in Black's Queen with 10.h3 and 11.Bf3. Perhaps 9. h4!? as in the game above might be tried.

 

9... h6! 10. Nge4 Bh3!?

Better 10... Nxe4! 11. Bxe4 (11. Nxe4 Bh3) 11... Bh3 12. Re1 Nd7

 

11. Nxf6+ Bxf6

11... exf6 12. e4

 

12. Bf3 Bg4

No better is 12... Qf5 13. e4 Qc5 14. Bxh6 Bxf1 15. Bxf8

 

13. Bxg4 Qxg4 14. Bxh6 Bg7 15. Bxg7 Kxg7

In compensation for the pawn, Black has some chances of developing an initiative along the h-file. Evan now manages to set some very difficult problems for his opponent who plays too defensively.

 

16. e3?!

White must forget about the pawn and fight for the initiative with 16. e4! Qh3 17. f4 Rh8 18. Rf2 Nd7 19. Qf1

 

16... Qh3 17. Qf3 Nd7 18. Qg2 Qh5 19. d4 Rh8 20. f3 Rh7 21. Rf2 Rah8










22. Re1 Qa5 23. Qf1 Nb6 24. a3 Rh3 25. Ne2 Qh5!

Trying to induce more weaknesses before recovering the pawn. Black can also recover his pawn directly with 25... Nxc4 since White gains nothing by 26. Nf4 R3h6 and Black's Knight is immune from capture due to White's loose Rook at e1.

 

26. Qg2 Qg5 27. f4 Qa5 28. Nc3 Nxc4 29. Ree2










29... Nxb2! 30. Ne4

30. Rxb2 Qxc3 31. Rxb7 Qxe3!

 

30... Nd3 31. Rf1 Qxa3

31... Rxh2!

 

32. Ra2 Qb3 33. Rxa7 Nb2 34. Ng5 Rxh2 35. Qxh2 Rxh2 36. Kxh2 Qxe3 37. Rxb7 Nc4 38. Nf3 Qe2+ 39. Kg1 Ne3 40. Rf2 Qd1+ 41. Kh2 Ng4+ 42. Kg2 Nxf2 43. Kxf2 Qc2+ 44. Ke3 Qc3+ 45. Ke2 Qc4+ 46. Ke3 c5 47. dxc5 Qxc5+ 48. Ke2 e5 49. Ng5 Qc4+ 50. Kf2 exf4

This game is an excellent demonstration of how to put pressure on an opponent who passively tries to defend material gains.

0-1

Round 2

Evan Ju (2203) - Anatoly Volovich (2450) [B08]

60th New Jersey Open 2006/Somerset, NJ USA (2) 2006


1. e4 g6 2. d4 Bg7 3. Nc3

3. c4 d6 (3... c5!? heads toward a Benoni or Accelerated Dragon) 4. Nc3 Nf6 transposes to the King's Indian Defense.

 

3... d6

Also played is 3... c5!?

 

4. Nf3 Nf6 5. h3

This line against the Pirc is recomended in the recent book Chess Openings for White, Explained.

 

5... c6!?

A tricky move order, which is not mentioned in COWE. They give instead 5... O-O 6. Be3 c6 7. a4 d5 (not mentioned is 7... Qa5!? 8. Qd2 (8. Bd3 Na6=) 8... b5! but they do give 7... a5 8. Be2 Na6 9. O-O Nb4 10. Nd2 d5 11. e5 Ne8 12. Na2 Nxa2 13. Rxa2 f6 14. f4 COWE) 8. e5 Ne4 9. Nxe4 (9. Bd3!? Nxc3 10. bxc3 c5 11. h4) 9... dxe4 10. Ng5 c5 11. c3

 

6. Be3

More consistent with White's strategy of restraint might be 6. a4 , which would likely transpose to the lines mentioned above.

 

6... b5!?

 

 

7. Bd3

The biggest challenge to Black's early queenside expansion is to strike immediately in the center with 7. e5! Nfd7 8. exd6 (8. e6!? fxe6 9. Qd2 O-O 10. h4) 8... exd6 9. Bg5 f6 (9... Nf6 10. Qe2+ Qe7 11. Qxe7+ Kxe7 12. O-O-O) 10. Qe2+ Kf7 11. Ne4 Bf8 (11... fxg5 12. Nexg5+) 12. Bf4

 

7... O-O 8. O-O a5 9. a4 b4 10. Ne2 Ba6 11. Ng3 Ne8 12. Nd2

White's plan of Nd2-b3 adopts an overly defensive posture, simply trying to hold his center pawns together. But it proves sufficient for equality.

 

12... Nd7 13. Nb3 Qb6?!

Putting the Queen opposite White's dark-squared Bishop has got to be a mistake. But perhaps Volovich wanted to get his young opponent to over-react. Better 13... Bxd3 14. Qxd3 c5 15. c3 Qc7

 

 

14. e5! Qc7 15. f4 Nb6 16. Bxa6 Rxa6 17. Qd3 Ra8 18. c4! bxc3 19. bxc3 Nd5 20. Bd2 Qa7 21. c4 Nb4 22. Bxb4 axb4 23. Kh2

23. Rae1 dxe5 (23... Qxa4?? 24. Ra1) 24. fxe5 Nc7 25. a5

 

23... Nc7 24. exd6 exd6 25. f5 d5 26. f6?! Bh6 27. Nc5 Rfe8 28. Rae1 dxc4 29. Qxc4 Nd5!

Black has found excellent squares for his pieces, especially his centralized Knight.

 

30. Rxe8+ Rxe8 31. Rf3 Qc7 32. Nd3 Re3 33. Ne5 Rxf3 34. gxf3 Bf4!

Forcing a winning endgame for Black.

 

35. Qxc6 Qxc6 36. Nxc6 Nxf6 37. Nxb4

White must surrender a piece or else the b-pawn runs: 37. Kg2 b3!.

 

37... Nh5 38. a5 Bxg3+ 39. Kg2 Bc7 40. a6 Nf4+ 41. Kh1 Bb6 42. Nc6 Nd5 43. a7 Nc7 44. d5 Bc5 45. Kg2 Kf8 46. Kg3 f5 47. f4

The game continued for at least another 50 moves, during which both sides were in time trouble. Eventually, White managed to clear all of the pawns off the board but at the cost of letting Black have Bishop and Knight versus lone King. However, in time pressure Volovich was unable to find the mating idea and had to settle for a draw. That should be a lesson to us all: don't neglect learning those basic endgames! Evan set the most difficult task for his opponent and was rewarded with a half point where he easily could have had a goose egg.

1/2-1/2

Round 3

Evan Ju (2203) - Rodion Rubenchik (2312) [C03]

60th New Jersey Open 2006/Somerset, NJ USA (3) 2006


1. e4 e6 2. d4 d5 3. Nd2 Be7!?

A relatively recent idea, recommended in the Third Edition of John Watson's Play the French.

 

4. Ngf3 Nf6 5. e5 Nfd7 6. Bd3 c5 7. c3 Nc6 8. O-O a5

Watson gives this as the main line. Also possible are 8... Qb6 and 8... g5!?

 

9. Re1 cxd4 10. cxd4 g5!?

This surprising move comes in eventually in practically every line of the 3... Be7 variation. Even Watson's main line continues 10... Qb6 11. Qa4?! (11. Nb1! Nxd4 12. Nxd4 Qxd4 13. Nc3) 11... g5!

 

 

11. h3 h5 12. Nf1 g4 13. hxg4 hxg4 14. N3h2 g3?!

The first move "out of book," but this does not seem much of an improvement on 14... Nxd4 15. Qxg4 or 14... Qb6! 15. Be3 and though Watson calls both these lines "unclear" they look good for White.

 

15. Nxg3! Bb4 16. Bd2

16. Re3!? Nxd4 17. Nh5

 

16... Bxd2 17. Qxd2 Nxd4 18. Qf4 Qh4 19. Ng4! Nc6 20. Rac1 Ke7

Black admits that his King will be stuck in the center. White is clearly for choice given his safer king, cleaner structure, and better development and piece placement. White practically has a winning advantage.

 

21. Bb5! Ndb8 22. Re3 Rg8 23. f3 Qg5 24. Qa4! Bd7 25. Qa3+ Kd8 26. Qc5

26. Qd6

 

26... Qf4 27. Ne2 Qb4 28. Qb6+ Ke7 29. Rb3 Qd2 30. Qc5+! Kd8 31. Nf6 Rh8

 

 

32. Qd6

Evan has created a powerful attack but the position remains so complex that it is difficult to find the best way to win.

32. Bxc6! Bxc6 (32... Nxc6 33. Rxb7) (32... bxc6?? 33. Qd6) 33. Qd6+ Nd7 34. Nxd7 Bxd7 35. Kf2!!

 

32... a4! 33. Rbc3 Qxb2

33... d4!? 34. Ne4!

 

34. Bxc6?!

34. Nd4!!

 

34... Qb6+ 35. Rc5 bxc6 36. Nd4 Ra7 37. g3?

37. Nxd5!

 

37... Qc7?

37... Qb2!! appears to force a draw.

 

38. Qxc7+

38. Rxc6!

 

38... Kxc7?

38... Rxc7 39. Nb5?! (39. Ra5! Rb7 40. Ra8) 39... Na6!! 40. Nxc7 Nxc5 41. Ncxd5! Nd3 42. Rd1 exd5 43. Rxd3 Ke7 and Black might be able to hold this ending.

 

39. Nb5+ Kb6 40. Nxa7 Kxa7 41. Rb1

41. Ra5+!! Kb6 42. Ra8!

 

41... Bc8 42. Ra5+ Ba6 43. Rxa4 c5 44. Ng4 d4 45. Nf2 c4 46. Ne4 Rc8 47. Kf2 Nd7 48. Nd6 Rc5 49. Nb5+

49. Rb7+ Ka8 50. Rxa6#

 

49... Rxb5 50. Rxb5 c3 51. Rba5 d3 52. Rxa6+ Kb7 53. Ra7+ Kc6 54. Rc4+ 1-0


Round 4

Jared Ying (2134) - Evan Ju (2203) [B06]

60th New Jersey Open 2006/Somerset, NJ USA (4) 2006


1. e4 g6 2. d4 Bg7 3. Nf3 c6 4. c3 d5 5. e5 h5 6. Bd3 Nh6 7. O-O Bf5

Evan adopts the Gurgenidze system, where the main idea is to exchange off the light-squared Bishop and hold the light squares with pawns, securing a solid game.

 

8. Nh4 e6 9. Nxf5 Nxf5 10. Nd2 c5 11. Nf3 Nc6 12. Qa4 Qb6 13. Bg5 cxd4 14. Bxf5 gxf5 15. cxd4 Qb4 16. Qxb4 Nxb4 17. Rfc1 Kd7=

Other than the slight weakness of his h-pawn, Black has equalized.

 

18. a3 Nc6 19. b4 Rac8 20. Kf1 Ne7 21. Nd2 Rhg8 22. f4 Bf8 23. Ke2 Ng6 24. Rxc8 Kxc8 25. Rc1+ Kd7 26. Nb3 b6 27. g3










27... h4!

Eliminating his only weakness and beginning an important counter-attack.

 

28. gxh4 Rh8 29. Rc3?! Bh6! 30. Rf3?!

a) 30. Bxh6 Rxh6

b) 30. Bf6 Nxf4+ 31. Kf1 Rg8 32. Rg3 Rxg3 33. hxg3 Nh5

 

30... Bxg5 31. hxg5 Rxh2+

Now Black's Knight and Rook get behind enemy lines to exploit White's many pawn weaknesses.

 

32. Kd3 Nh4 33. Rf1 Rh3+ 34. Kc2 Ng2 35. Rf2 Ne3+ 36. Kc1 Nc4 37. Nd2 Nxa3 38. Kb2 Rd3 39. Nb3 Nb5 40. Kc2










40... Rc3+! 41. Kb2 Rc4

Black now wins at least the b-pawn, after which his connected passers will win the game.

 

42. g6 fxg6 43. Rg2 Rxb4 44. Rxg6 Nxd4 45. Kc3 Rc4+ 46. Kb2 Rc2+ 47. Kb1 Rc4 48. Rg7+ Ke8 49. Nd2

49. Nxd4 Rxd4 50. Rxa7 Rxf4

 

49... Rb4+ 50. Ka2 Nb5 0-1


Round 5

Emory Tate (2447) - Evan Ju (2203) [C00]

60th New Jersey Open 2006/Somerset, NJ USA (5) 2006


1. e4 e6 2. Nc3 d5 3. Nf3 Nf6 4. e5 Nfd7 5. d4 c5 6. Ne2 Nc6 7. c3 Qb6!?

More common is 7... cxd4 which John Watson gives as the main line.

 

8. a3 f6 9. Nf4 fxe5! 10. Nxe6 cxd4 11. cxd4

11. Nfg5?! Nf6! 12. Bd3 e4 13. Bf4?! (13. Bb5 Bxe6 14. Nxe6 Kf7 15. Ng5+ Kg8 16. Bxc6 bxc6 17. cxd4 c5) 13... Bxe6 14. Nxe6 Rc8 15. O-O? (15. Be2 d3) 15... exd3 16. Re1 Kf7 17. Qxd3 h6 18. Qg3 dxc3 19. Bd6 Ne4 20. Rxe4 dxe4 21. Bxf8 Rhxf8 22. Rd1 Ne7 0-1 Holving,R-Landgren,P/Norrkoping,SWE Easter op 1997

 

11... Nf6 12. dxe5

12. Nxf8 Rxf8 (12... e4!? 13. Nxh7 Rxh7 14. Ng5 Rh8) 13. dxe5 Ng4 14. Qe2 Rxf3! 15. gxf3 Nd4 16. Qd1 Bf5!

 

12... Ng4?

12... Bxe6! is safest when 13. exf6 gxf6 (13... O-O-O!?) 14. Bd3 (14. Qe2 Kf7) 14... O-O-O 15. O-O leads to balanced play where Black has excellent chances.

 

13. Ned4?

13. Qxd5!! Qxf2+ (13... Be7 14. Nfd4!) 14. Kd1 Qb6 15. Bc4 is unclear, but White has a strong initiative at no cost.

 

13... Bc5 14. Bb5 O-O!

14... Ngxe5? 15. Nxe5! is too dangerous for Black to consider.

 

15. Bxc6 bxc6 16. O-O Ba6 17. b4 Bxd4 18. Nxd4 Nxe5 19. Re1










Better was 19. b5!

 

19... Nd3!

Winning the Exchange, since the Knight also masks White's Queen from defending the Knight at d4.

 

20. Be3 Nxe1 21. Qxe1 Rae8 22. Qc3 Rf6 23. Nb3 Qc7 24. Qc5 Qe5

White has some compensation for the Exchange due to Black's weakness on the dark squares, so it is important to play actively for the initiative.

24... Bc4! 25. Nd2 Qe5 26. Rc1 Qb2 27. Rb1 Qc2 28. Qxa7 Rfe6!

 

25. Nd4 Ref8?!

There are no targets on the f-file. Perhaps 25... Rg6! 26. g3 Bc8 pursuing targets on the light squares, exploiting the "opposite colored Bishops."

 

26. h3 Bc8 27. Rc1 Bd7

27... Qe4!? 28. Nxc6 Bb7

 

28. Qxa7 R8f7 29. Qa8+ Rf8 30. Qb7 R8f7 31. Qb6

31. Qa8+ Rf8 32. Qb7 Qe8

 

31... Rf8 32. Nxc6

White has gotten significant counterplay, with a potentially dangerous passed pawn pair. Black must play very aggessively now to keep the edge.

 

32... Qe4!

Targetting the light squares.

 

33. f3 Qe8

33... Rxf3!! 34. gxf3 Qxf3

 

34. b5 Rg6 35. Kh2

35. Qd4 Bxh3 36. Rc2

 

35... Qe6!

Threatening Rxg2+ and Qxh3+.

 

36. Rc2










36... Rxf3! 37. Qb8+

37. gxf3?? Qxh3#

 

37... Rf8 38. Qe5?










38... Bxc6!

Snagging a piece.

 

39. Qxe6+ Rxe6 40. Bc5 Rc8! 41. a4

41. bxc6 Rexc6

 

41... Bd7 42. Rc3 d4 43. Bxd4 Rxc3 44. Bxc3 Re4 45. b6 Bc6 46. a5 Re2 47. Kg1 Rxg2+ 48. Kf1 Rg3 49. Be1 Ra3 50. h4 Ra2 0-1


Round 6

Evan Ju (2203) - Dean Ippolito (IM 2447) [C42]

60th New Jersey Open 2006/Somerset, NJ USA (6) 2006


1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 Nf6 3. Nxe5 d6 4. Nf3 Nxe4 5. d4 d5 6. Bd3 Bd6

Some were surpr ised by Ippolito's choice of opening, since he had to win to secure a share of first (or perhaps clear first on tie-breaks), yet the Petroff is judged to be rather drawish. However, Ippolito is a specialist in this line, with which he has had significant success.

 

7. O-O

7. c4 Bb4+! 8. Nbd2 Bf5 9. Be2?! Nc6 10. O-O O-O 11. Nb3 dxc4 12. Bxc4 Bg4 13. h3 Bh5 14. a3 Be7 15. g4 Bg6 16. d5 Nb8 17. Nfd4 Nd7 18. Nf5 Bxf5 19. gxf5 Nb6 20. Qe2 Nd6 21. Bd3 Nxd5 0-1 Furdzik,R-Ippolito,D/New York USA 2003 (35)

 

7... O-O 8. c4

Ippolito seems to have had more trouble against 8. Re1 Bf5!

(8... Re8 9. c4 c6 10. Nc3 Nxc3 11. bxc3 Bg4 12. Bg5 Rxe1+ 13. Qxe1 Qd7 14. Ne5! (14. c5 Bc7 15. Qe3 Qe6 16. h3 Qxe3 17. fxe3 Be6 18. Bf4 Bxf4 19. exf4 b6 20. Rb1 bxc5 21. Ng5 Bd7 22. Bxh7+ Kf8 23. Bc2 1-0 Socko,B-Ippolito,D/Calicut IND 1998 (42) ) 14... Bxe5 15. Qxe5 f6?! 16. Bxf6 gxf6 17. Qxf6 Na6 18. Re1 Rf8 19. Qh4 Bf5 (19... Rf7 20. Re5) 20. Re7 Qxe7 21. Qxe7 1-0 Ivanov,A-Ippolito,D/Connecticut USA 2000 (43))

9. Nc3!? (9. c4!) 9... Nxc3 10. bxc3 Bxd3 11. Qxd3 Nd7 12. Bg5 f6 13. Bh4 Nb6 14. Nd2 Qd7 15. c4 dxc4 16. Nxc4 Qb5 17. Nxd6 Qxd3 18. cxd3 cxd6 19. Bg3 d5 20. Re7 Rf7 21. Rae1 Raf8 22. Bd6 Rxe7 23. Rxe7 Nc8 24. Rd7 Nxd6 25. Rxd6 Rc8 26. g4 Rc2 27. Rxd5 Rxa2 28. Rd8+ Kf7 29. Rd7+ Kg6 30. Rxb7 Ra3 31. Kg2 1/2-1/2 Milman,L-Ippolito,D/San Diego USA 2006

 

8... c6 9. Nc3

9. cxd5 cxd5 10. Nc3 Nxc3 11. bxc3 Bg4 12. Rb1 Nd7!

(12... b6?! 13. Rb5! Bc7 14. h3 a6 15. Rxd5!? Qxd5 16. hxg4 Re8 17. Bc2 Nd7 18. Qd3 g6 19. Ng5 Qd6 20. Qh3 Nf6 21. Bb3 Re7 22. f4 Kg7 23. Nf3 h5 24. g5 Ng4 25. Ne5 f5 26. gxf6+ Nxf6 27. Bc2 Nd5 28. Bxg6 Qf6 29. Be4 1-0 DeFirmian,N-Ippolito,D/New York 1994)

13. h3 Bh5 14. Rb5 (14. Rxb7 Nb6) 14... Nb6 15. c4 Bxf3 16. Qxf3 dxc4 17. Bc2 Qd7 18. a4 g6 19. Bh6

(19. Bd2 c3?! (19... Bc7!) 20. Qxc3 Rac8 21. Qb3 Bb8 22. Bd1 Qxd4 23. Be3 Qd6?! 24. g3 Nc4 25. Bh6 Rfd8 26. Rxb7 1-0 Bartholomew,J-Ippolito,D/Las Vegas USA 2006 (37))

19... Rfe8 20. Rfb1 Rad8 21. Be3 Bc7 22. a5 Nd5 23. Rxb7 Qd6 24. g3 Qe6 (24... Nxe3!) 25. Bg5 (25. Ba4!) 25... f6 26. Bxf6? Rf8 27. Bxd8 Rxf3 28. Bxc7 Qe2 (28... Nxc7) 29. Be5 Qxf2+ 30. Kh1 Rf7 31. Rb8+ Rf8 32. R8b7 Qf3+ 33. Kh2 Qe2+ 34. Kg1 Qe3+ 35. Kh1 Qf3+ 36. Kh2 Nf6 37. g4 Qf2+ 38. Kh1 Qxc2 39. g5 Nd7 40. Bf6 Qe4+ 0-1 Bierkens,P-Ippolito,D/Philadelphia USA 2001

 

9... Nxc3 10. bxc3 dxc4 11. Bxc4 Bg4 12. Qd3

12. h3 Bh5 13. Be3

(a) 13. Re1 Nd7 14. Rb1 b5 15. Be2

(15. Bd3 Bg6 16. Bxg6 hxg6 17. Bg5 Qc7 18. Be7 Rfe8 19. Bxd6 Qxd6 20. Qd2 Nb6 21. Qg5 Nd5 22. Qd2 Rad8 23. Ne5 Nb6 24. Nd3 Rxe1+ 25. Rxe1 c5 26. Nxc5 Qf6 27. Ne4 Qf5 28. Ng3 Qd5 29. Re7 a6 30. Ne4 Kf8 31. Qe3 Kxe7 0-1 Skovgaard,P-Ippolito,D/Internet ICC 2000)

15... a6 16. a4 Nb6 17. axb5 axb5 18. Ng5 Bg6 19. Bd3 Be7 20. Bxg6 hxg6 21. Ne4 Re8 22. Bf4 Nd5 23. Bd2 Nb6 24. Be3 Qd5 25. Nd2 Bd6 26. Rb2 Ra3 27. Rc2 Ra4 28. Qf3 Qxf3 29. Nxf3 Nd5 30. Bd2 Rxe1+ 31. Nxe1 1/2-1/2 Peterson,W-Ippolito,D/Philadelphia USA 2003)

 

(b) 13. Rb1 b5 14. Be2 Qa5 15. Qb3 Re8 16. Rb2 Qc7 17. d5 a6 18. a4 Re4 19. dxc6 Rxa4 20. Qd5 Bg6 21. Rd2 Bf8 22. Ne5 Be4 23. Qd8 Qxe5 24. c7 Nc6 25. Qxa8 Qxc7 26. Bd1 Nb8 27. Rd5 Rc4 28. Bf3 Bxd5 29. Bxd5 Rxc3 30. Be3 h6 31. Re1 a5 32. Bd2 Ra3 33. Re8 Ra1+ 34. Be1 Kh7 35. g3 Bb4 36. Rxb8 Rxe1+ 37. Kg2 Re5 38. Rxb5 Qe7 39. Rb7 Qf8 40. Qxf8 Bxf8 1/2-1/2 Brownscombe,T-Ippolito,D/Alexandria,VA US Open 1996)

13... Nd7 14. Be2 Re8 15. c4 Nf6 16. Qb3 Qc7 17. Rfe1 Ne4 18. Rad1 b6 19. Nd2 Bxe2 20. Rxe2 c5 21. Nxe4 Rxe4 22. d5 Rae8 23. Rde1 Qe7 24. Qd3 Qe5 25. g3 Qh5 26. Kg2 Qg6 27. Qc2 Bxg3 28. Bg5 Rxe2 29. Rxe2 Rxe2 30. Qxe2 Bd6 31. Qg4 f5 0-1 Tyehimba,B-Ippolito,D/Philadelphia USA 2005

 

 

12... Bh5!?

The first novelty. Ippolito has played 12...Nd7 previously, but White got a dangerous kingside initiative:

12... Nd7 13. Ng5 Nf6 14. h3 Bh5 15. f4 h6 16. g4! hxg5 17. fxg5! Nxg4 18. hxg4 Qd7 19. Qh3 (19. gxh5!? Qg4+ 20. Kf2 and the complications are completely beyond human comprehension.) 19... Bxg4 20. Qh4 Bf5 21. Bf4 (21. Rf3!?) 21... Bxf4 22. Rxf4 b5 23. Bb3 (23. Raf1!? bxc4 24. Rxf5 Qe6 25. R5f3 Qg6 26. Rh3 f6) 23... Rae8 (23... c5 24. Raf1) 24. Raf1? (24. Kf2!! with the idea of Rah1 gives White a winning attack according to Fritz.) 24... Bg6! 25. Qh1 Re3 26. Rh4 Bh5! 27. Qh2 (27. Rxh5?? Qg4+) 27... Re2 28. Rf2 Re1+ 29. Kg2 Qe7 30. Qg3 Bg6 31. Kh2 Be4 32. Qf4 g6 33. Qf6 Qxf6 34. Rxf6 Re2+ 35. Kg3 Bd5 36. Bxd5 cxd5 37. Rf2 Re3+ 38. Rf3 Rxf3+ 39. Kxf3 Rc8 40. Kf4 Rxc3 41. Ke5 Rc2 42. Kxd5 b4 43. a3 bxa3 44. Rh3 Ra2 45. Kd6 Ra1 46. d5 f6 47. Re3 fxg5 48. Ke7 Rd1 49. Rxa3 Rxd5 50. Rxa7 Rf5 51. Ke6 Rf4 52. Ke5 Rf7 53. Ra1 Kg7 54. Rg1 Rf5+ 55. Ke6 Ra5 56. Rg2 Ra1 57. Ke5 Re1+ 58. Kd4 g4 59. Kd3 Kf6 60. Kd2 Re4 61. Kd3 Kf5 62. Rg1 Rf4 63. Ke2 Rf3 64. Rb1 Kf4 65. Rb6 Kg3 66. Rxg6 Rf8 67. Rg7 Kh3 68. Rh7+ Kg2 69. Rg7 g3 70. Rg6 Kh2 71. Rh6+ Kg1 72. Rg6 g2 73. Rg7 Rf5 74. Rg8 Re5+ 75. Kf3 Rf5+ 76. Ke2 Rh5 77. Kf3 Rh3+ 78. Ke2 Kh1 79. Kf2 Rh2 0-1 Morozevich,A-Ippolito,D/New York Open 1997 -- an amazing win against the now famous Super-GM. Perhaps Ippolito feared that Ju would know this game.

 

13. Ng5

13. Qf5!? Bg6 14. Qg4

 

13... Bg6 14. Qf3 Nd7 15. Bd3 Bxd3 16. Qxd3 Nf6 17. Re1 Qc7 18. h3 Rad8 19. Ne4 Nxe4 20. Qxe4 Rd7 21. Qf5 Re7 22. Bd2 Rfe8=

Black appears to have very slightly the better chances due to White's weaker pawn structure and Black's better control of the e-file. But that is hardly enough to offer a real advantage. Ju now plays very actively to eliminate any weaknesses.

 

23. Re3! Rxe3 24. Bxe3 Qe7 25. a4! Bc7 26. Rb1 b6

26... Qd6? 27. Rxb7!

 

27. c4 g6 28. Qf3 Qd6 29. g3 Qe6 30. Rc1 Qe4 31. Kg2 Bd6 32. Qxe4 Rxe4 33. Kf3

Perhaps the better path to the desired draw was by 33. a5! bxa5 34. c5 Bc7 35. Rb1 Re7 (35... Re8 36. Rb7 Bb8 37. Kf3) 36. Bg5 Re8 (36... Rd7? 37. Rb7) 37. Rb7 Bb8 38. Kf3 f5 39. Bf4 (or 39. Be7!? followed by Bd6) 39... Bxf4 40. Kxf4 Re4+ 41. Kg5! Rxd4 42. Kf6 Rd8 43. Rg7+ Kh8 44. Rxa7 and I think Ippolito would be happy to take a draw here....

 

33... f5 34. Rb1 Kf7 35. c5 Bc7










36. cxb6

There is a complicated idea in 36. a5!? b5 (36... bxa5? 37. Rb7 Re7 38. Bg5) 37. d5! a6 (37... cxd5 38. Rxb5) 38. d6! (38. dxc6 Re6!) 38... Bxa5 39. Rd1! (39. Ra1? Ra4 40. Rd1 b4 (40... Bd8 41. h4 Rc4 42. d7) 41. d7 Bd8 42. h4 b3 43. Bg5 b2 44. Rb1 Bxg5 45. hxg5 Ke7 46. Rxb2 Kxd7) 39... Bd8 40. h4 b4 41. d7 b3 42. Bg5 and it appears that White secures a draw.

 

36... Bxb6 37. Rb3

37. Rc1 Bxd4 38. Rxc6 Bxe3 39. Rc7+ Kg8 40. fxe3 Rxa4

 

37... Re7

37... Ke6 38. a5! Bxd4 39. Rb7 Bxe3 40. fxe3=

 

38. Rc3 Re6 39. Rc4 Rd6 40. Ke2 Ke6 41. Kd3

Too risky is 41. a5 Bxa5 42. Bf4 Rd5 43. Rxc6+ Kd7 44. Ra6 Bb6 45. Be5=

 

41... Kd7 42. Rc1 g5 43. a5 Bxa5 44. Rc5 Rd5 45. Rxd5+ cxd5 46. Bxg5 h5 47. f3 Be1 48. g4 fxg4 49. fxg4 hxg4 50. hxg4 Bf2 51. Bd2 Ke6 52. Kc3 Kf6 53. Kd3 Kg6 54. Kc3 Kf6 55. Kd3 Kf7 56. Kc3 Kg6 57. Kd3 Bh4 58. Kc3 Be7 59. Kb3 Bf6 60. Be3 Bxd4 61. Bxd4 Kg5 1/2-1/2

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Copyright © 2006 Michael Goeller