Games from Folkestone 1933

Saviely Tartakower - Isaac Kashdan [A12]

Folkestone ol (Men)/Folkestone, England (4.1) 1933


1. Nf3 Nf6 2. e3 d5 3. b3 g6 4. Bb2 Bg7 5. c4 dxc4 6. Bxc4

6. bxc4 seems more in keeping with Tartakower's "Hypermodern" principles, gaining a pawn advantage in the center.

 

6... c5 7. O-O O-O 8. d4 cxd4 9. Nxd4 a6 10. Nc3 b5 11. Be2 Bb7 12. Bf3 Ra7

"A peculiar looking move, but the best way of getting the Rook into play" writes Kashdan.

 

13. Bxb7 Rxb7 14. Qf3 Rd7 15. Nc6?

"Losing time, by exchanging a centrally-placed piece for an undevelped one."

15. Rad1 b4! (15... e5 16. Nc6!) 16. Na4 e5! 17. Nc2

 

15... Nxc6 16. Qxc6 Rd6 17. Qf3 Nd7!

Putting pressure on the long diagonal.

 

18. Rad1

18. Nd1!?

 

18... Nc5

18... Ne5! 19. Qe2 Nd3 20. Ba1 f5!

 

19. Rxd6

19. Ba3!? Bxc3 20. Bxc5 Rxd1 21. Rxd1=

 

19... Qxd6 20. Rd1 Qe6 21. Qe2 Rc8 22. Nd5 Ne4 23. Bxg7 Kxg7 24. Qb2+ f6 25. f3?










Better was 25. Qd4! Rc2

 

25... Nc3!!

Forcing the win of a pawn.

25... Nd6 26. e4

 

26. Nxc3 Qxe3+ 27. Kh1 Rxc3 28. h3 b4 29. Qb1 e5

Suddenly Black has an extra pawn and an overwhelming advantage in space.

 

30. Re1 Qd3! 31. Qxd3 Rxd3

Kashdan writes: "The Rook ending is easily won as Black soon obtains a passed pawn."

 

32. Re2 Kf7 33. Rc2 Rc3 34. Rd2 Ke6 35. Kg1 f5 36. Kf2 g5 37. Ke2 a5 38. Kd1 e4 39. fxe4 fxe4 40. Rd8 Rg3

Kashdan notes that the simplification to a K+P ending also wins but requires careful play: 40... Rd3+!? 41. Rxd3 exd3 42. Kd2 Ke5 43. Kxd3 Kf4 44. Ke2 Kg3 45. Kf1 Kh2 46. Kf2 h6!! (46... h5? 47. Kf3!) 47. Kf1 h5 48. Kf2 g4! 49. hxg4 hxg4 50. Kf1 g3

 

41. Ra8 Rxg2 42. Rxa5 Kf6 43. Ke1 Rh2 44. Ra4 Kf5 45. Rxb4 Rxa2 46. Rb7 h5 47. Rf7+ Ke5 48. b4 Rh2 49. b5 Rxh3 50. b6 Rb3 51. b7 h4 52. Kf2 g4 53. Re7+ Kf5 54. Rf7+ Kg6 55. Re7 h3 56. Rxe4 g3+ 57. Ke2 h2 58. Rg4+ Kf5 59. Rxg3 Rb2+ 0-1


William Albert Fairhurst - Isaac Kashdan [D15]

Folkestone ol (Men)/Folkestone, England (2.1) 1933


1. d4 Nf6 2. c4 c6 3. Nf3 d5 4. Nc3 dxc4 5. e3 b5 6. a4 b4 7. Na2 e6 8. Bxc4 Nbd7 9. O-O Bb7 10. Qe2 c5 11. Ne5! cxd4?!

"To isolate the [d-pawn], but the opening of the [e-file] gives White too many chances" writes Kashdan.

11... Nxe5 12. dxe5 Nd7 13. f4 Qc7 14. Rd1 O-O-O!? with the idea of ...g5 and ...Rg8 according to IK.

 

12. exd4 Bd5

12... Be7? 13. Nxf7! Kxf7 14. Qxe6+ mates.

 

13. Bg5!

13. Bb5 Be7 14. Bg5 O-O

 

13... Bxc4 14. Qxc4 h6

14... Qc8!?

 

15. Bxf6 gxf6 16. Nc6

16. Nxd7 Qxd7 17. Nxb4?? Rc8 18. Qb3 Rb8

 

16... Qc7 17. Rfe1

17. Naxb4? Bxb4

Kashdan says better was 17. Rac1! a5 18. Rfe1 which improves upon the game continuation (also strong is 18. d5!):

 

17... Nb6










Better was 17... Bd6! 18. d5 Bxh2+ 19. Kf1 Ne5 20. Nxe5 Bxe5

 

18. Rxe6+!!

Kashdan writes: "Extremely tempting, but it proves unsound." Computer analysis, however, proves him wrong. Kashdan was correct to say, though, that "There was little choice however" -- that is, if White had to play for a win to help the team standings.

a) 18. Qb5? a6

b) 18. Qc2? b3!

c) 18. Qc1 Nd5 19. Qc4 Nb6= and White gains only a draw.

 

18... Kd7!

18... fxe6? 19. Qxe6+ Be7 20. Re1 Nc8 21. Naxb4 (21. Qxf6!?)

 

19. Qb5 fxe6

19... Kxe6? 20. Re1+ Kd6 21. Naxb4!! (Kashdan gives instead 21. Qc5+ Kd7 22. Qf5+ Kxc6 23. Rc1+ Kb7 24. Qe4+ Kb8 25. Rxc7 Kxc7 26. a5) 21... Qd7 (21... a5 22. Qc5+ Kd7 23. Qf5+ Kd6 24. Qxf6+) 22. a5

 

20. Ne5+?

20. Rc1! a6 Kashdan(20... Qd6 Fritz8 21. Naxb4! Rh7 (21... Ke8? 22. Qh5+! Kd7 23. Qf7+) (21... Qf4 22. Nd3!) 22. a5! Ke8 23. axb6 axb6 24. Ne5+ Kd8 25. Nbc6+) 21. Ne5+ Kd8 22. Nf7+!! ( Kashdan gives the line 22. Qa5? Qb7 23. Nc6+ Ke8 "and Black has an easy defense.") 22... Qxf7 23. Qxb6+ Ke8 24. Qc6+ Qd7 25. Qxa8+ Kf7 26. Nxb4 Qxd4 27. Qb7+ (27. Nc6!?) 27... Kg6 28. Nxa6

 

20... Kd8 21. Rc1 fxe5!

21... Qb7 22. Nc6+ Ke8 23. Ne5+=

 

22. Rxc7 Kxc7 23. Nxb4 Bxb4 24. Qxb4 exd4 25. Qe7+ Kc6 26. Qxe6+ Kc5 27. Qf5+ Nd5 28. Qc2+ Kd6 29. Qg6+ Ke5 30. Qh5+ Kd6 31. Qg6+ Kc5 32. Qc2+ Kb4 33. Qd2+ Kxa4 34. Qxd4+ Nb4 35. Qd1+ Ka5 36. Qh5+ Kb6 37. Qg6+ Nc6

Kashdan writes: "At last Black is out of check, and the position is cleared. It is now a matter of getting the Rooks into play, and either winning the Pawns, or building up mating threats."

 

38. h4 Rad8 39. Qc2 Rhe8 40. Qb3+ Kc7 41. Qg3+ Rd6 42. Qc3 Re4 43. g3 a5 44. Kg2 Re2 45. g4 Rdd2 46. Qg7+ Kb6 47. Qxh6 Rxf2+ 48. Kg3 Rg2+ 49. Kf3 Rdf2+ 50. Ke3 Rxb2 51. g5 Rg4 52. g6 Rb3+ 53. Kf2 Ra4 54. Qc1 Rxh4 55. Qg1 Rh2+!

Black wins White's Queen and stops the pawn after 56.Ke1+ Kb7 57.Qxh2 Rb1+ followed by Rb2+, Rxh2, Ne7, and the free advance of the a-pawn to the queening square. Kashdan got a lucky break in that round, though obviously White's correct attacking continuation was very hard to find over the board - or even with traditional analysis not assisted by a computer.

0-1

Isaac Kashdan - Fricis Apscheneek [B38]

Folkestone ol (Men)/Folkestone (6.1) 1933


1. e4 c5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. d4 cxd4 4. Nxd4 g6 5. c4 Bg7 6. Be3 Nf6 7. Nc3 d6 8. Be2 O-O 9. O-O Bd7 10. h3 a6 11. Qd2 Rc8 12. Rac1 Nxd4 13. Bxd4 Bc6 14. Qe3 Nd7 15. Bxg7 Kxg7 16. b4 b6 17. Rfd1 a5 18. a3 axb4 19. axb4 Ra8 20. Ra1 f5 21. Rxa8 Bxa8 22. exf5 gxf5 23. Nd5 Bxd5 24. Rxd5 f4 25. Qd4+ Ne5 26. c5

Black has less counterplay after 26. Rb5 winning a pawn.

 

26... bxc5 27. bxc5 Qa5 28. cxd6 Qe1+ 29. Bf1 exd6! 30. Rxd6 f3 31. g4 Rf6 32. Rd5 Re6 33. Rd7+ Kg6

33... Kg8 34. Ra7! threatens both Ra8+ and Ra1!

 

34. Ra7 Rc6

Now Black threatens Qxf1+! followed by Rc1+ forcing mate. Not 34... h6 35. Ra1 wins the Queen or(35. Qd8! forces mate.)

 

 

35. Kh2!!

No matter what Black does, White gets a mating attack.

35. Ra1 Qc3

 

35... Kf6 36. Qd8+ Ke6 37. Re7+ Kf6 38. Qf8+ 1-0


Frank James Marshall - Karel Treybal [D55]

Folkestone ol (Men)/Folkestone (15.2) 1933


Marshall's win in this last-round game was especially important for his team, since the Czech contingent had already scored on the other boards. A loss to Treybal would actually have handed the Czechs the Gold medal! Marshall finished with a solid 4 wins and 6 draws, taking the prize for best performance on second board.

1. d4 d5 2. c4 e6 3. Nf3 Nf6 4. Nc3 Be7 5. Bg5 O-O 6. e3 Ne4

More frequently seen today is 6... h6 but the view at the time was that White does well following 7. Bxf6! (7. Bh4 Ne4 is called Lasker's Defense - though Lasker himself often played it without ...h6!) 7... Bxf6 8. cxd5 exd5 9. Bd3

 

7. Bxe7 Qxe7 8. cxd5 Nxc3 9. bxc3 exd5 10. Qb3 Rd8 11. Bd3 c5!= 12. Qa3 b6 13. O-O Nc6

13... Bg4!

 

14. Bb5 c4!?

Kashdan notes: "With this move the game now takes a definite character. Black will strive to break through on the Queenside, and White will have the advntage in the centre. The play will be based on the eventual [b5] for Black, and [e4] for White."

 

15. Qxe7 Nxe7 16. Ba4

16. e4 a6!

 

16... Bf5 17. Rfc1 a6 18. Bc2 b5 19. Nd2 Be6 20. Rcb1 f5 21. a3 Ng6 22. f4!

The backwa rd e-pawn is not important since White will play Ne5 blocking the e-file.

22. Nf3!? Rdb8 23. h4! h5 24. g3

 

22... Rdb8 23. Nf3 Rb7 24. Ne5 Nxe5 25. fxe5 Rab8 26. Rb2 a5 27. Rab1 Kf7?

27... g6!

 

28. Rf1! b4 29. axb4 axb4 30. g4 Kg8

30... g6 31. e4

 

31. gxf5 Bd7 32. e6 Bc6 33. cxb4 Rxb4 34. Rxb4 Rxb4 35. Ra1 Kf8

35... Rb2 36. Ra6 Bb7 37. e7 Kf7 38. Re6 Ke8 39. Ba4+

 

36. Ra6 Be8










37. e4!

White forces two connected passed pawns which will be irresistable in their combined lust to expand.

 

37... Rb5

a) 37... Rb2 38. exd5! Rxc2 39. d6! c3 40. Ra8 Rc1+ 41. Kg2 c2 42. d7 Rg1+ 43. Kh3

b) 37... dxe4? 38. d5

 

38. Ra8 Ke7










39. Rxe8+! Kxe8 40. Ba4 1-0


Reuben Fine - Einar Thorvaldsson [D36]

Folkestone ol (Men)/Folkestone (1.3) 1933


1. d4 Nf6 2. c4 e6 3. Nc3 d5 4. Bg5 Nbd7 5. cxd5 exd5 6. e3 Be7 7. Bd3 c6 8. Qc2 h6?!

A potential weakness. Safer is O-O, Re8, and Ndf8.

 

9. Bf4

9. Bh4 O-O 10. Nf3 Re8 11. O-O Ne4

 

9... O-O

9... Nh5!?

 

10. O-O-O b5 11. Nf3 a5

 

 

12. g4!

Exploiting the hook at h6.

 

12... Ne8

12... Nxg4?! 13. Rdg1 h5 14. h3 Ngf6 15. Rg5 Kh8 16. Rhg1

 

13. h4 Bd6 14. h5

14. g5 h5

 

14... Bxf4

14... Be7 15. Rdg1 Bg5 16. Bxg5 hxg5 17. h6 g6 18. Bxg6

 

15. exf4 f6?!

15... Nb6 16. Ne5

 

16. Nh4! f5 17. Rdg1 Ndf6 18. Ng6 Rf7 19. Ne5 Rc7 20. Bxf5

20. g5!

 

20... Bxf5 21. Qxf5 Qc8 22. Qg6 Nh7 23. g5 Nf8 24. Qd3 Qe6 25. f5 Qd6 26. f6 gxf6 27. gxh6+ Kh8 28. Qg3 Qe6










29. Ng6+ Nxg6 30. hxg6

a simply overwhelming position, which Fritz rates an astronomical +40 forWhite!

1-0

Marcel Duchamp - Arthur William Dake [E20]

Folkestone ol (Men)/Folkestone (3.4) 1933


The famous artist and New Yorker, Marcel Duchamps, played for his native France on Alekhine's team. His score on bottom board, however, was a rather dismal 2/12!

1. d4 Nf6 2. c4 e6 3. Nc3 Bb4 4. Bd2?! O-O 5. Nf3 b6 6. e3 Bb7 7. Bd3 d6 8. O-O Bxc3 9. Bxc3 Ne4 10. Qc2 f5

"Black has now reached a position of the Dutch Defense which gives him good prospects" writes Kashdan.

 

11. Rad1 Nd7!?

11... Nxc3 12. bxc3 Bxf3 13. gxf3 Qh4 14. Kh1 Rf6 (14... Nd7!) 15. Rg1=

 

12. b4?

12. Be1! Ndf6 13. Nd2! followed by f3.

 

12... Nxc3! 13. Qxc3 Bxf3 14. gxf3 Qh4 15. Kg2

15. Kh1? Rf6 16. Rg1 Qxf2 because the pawn at f2 is no longer guarded by the White Queen.

 

15... Rf6 16. Rh1 a5 17. b5 e5 18. Bc2

18. h3!? e4 19. Bc2 Rg6+ 20. Kf1 Qh5

 

18... e4! 19. Rdg1

19. f4 Rg6+ 20. Kf1 Qh3+ 21. Ke1 Qg2

 

19... Rg6+ 20. Kf1 Qh3+ 21. Ke1 Qxf3 22. Bd1 Qh3 23. Rxg6 hxg6 24. Rg1 Qxh2

24... Kh7! 25. Rg5 Qxh2

 

25. Rxg6 Qh1+ 26. Kd2 Qf1 27. Be2 Qxf2 28. c5 Kh7 29. Rg5 Nf6 30. cxd6 cxd6 31. Qc6










31... f4! 32. Qxa8

32. exf4 Qxf4+ 33. Kd1 Qxg5 34. Qxa8 Nd5

 

32... Qxe3+ 33. Kd1 f3 34. Rxg7+? Kxg7 35. Qb7+ Kg6 36. Qc8 Qxd4+ 37. Ke1 e3?!

37... Qb4+!

0-1


Leonhard Abramavicius - Albert Simonson [E62]

Folkestone ol (Men)/Folkestone (12.4) 1933


1. d4 Nf6 2. Nf3 g6 3. c4 Bg7 4. Nc3 O-O 5. g3 d6 6. Bg2 Nc6 7. O-O e5 8. d5 Ne7 9. e4 Nd7 10. Nh4 f5 11. Bg5 Nf6 12. Qd2 fxe4 13. Nxe4 Nxe4 14. Bxe4 Bh3 15. Rfe1

15. Ng2 Qd7 16. Bh6

 

15... Qd7 16. Bg2?! Bxg2 17. Bxe7 Qxe7 18. Nxg2 Qf6 19. Re2 g5 20. Rae1?! Rf7 21. b4 Raf8 22. Rf1 g4!

Black's attack along the f-file builds in a logical succession.

 

23. Qc2 h5 24. Nh4 Bh6 25. c5 Kg7 26. Ng2 Bg5 27. Re4 Qg6 28. Qe2 Rf3! 29. Ne1 Qf5 30. cxd6

30. Nxf3?? gxf3 31. g4 (31. Qc2 Qh3) 31... fxe2 32. gxf5 exf1=Q+

 

30... cxd6 31. Rc4 Rf7 32. h4?!

"This only hastens the end by forcing the Black Bishop to the correct diagonal" writes Horowitz.

 

32... Bd8 33. Rc2 e4 34. Ng2

34. Rc4 e3 35. Nxf3 gxf3 36. Qb2+ Bf6!

 

34... Bb6!

now threatening Rxg3.

 

35. Kh2 e3

35... Bxf2 also wins.

 

36. Nf4










36... Rxf4!!

36... Rxf2+ 37. Rxf2 exf2

 

37. gxf4 Qxf4+

After 38.Kg1 Qe4! it ends quickly.

0-1

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