Guseinov's Gambit Refuted?

by Michael Goeller

A good chess analyst has to remain objective to achieve good results, but we all know that bias toward White or Black is inevitable due to the very nature of the game. If we play White in a given position, we see great promise in White's position. If we play Black, White is busted. Maybe it's because I suddenly have a desire to play the Sicilian again after reading Richard Palliser's excellent Fighting the Anti-Sicilians (Everyman 2007) that I suddenly think White is busted in a line that I have been playing for White for the last two years. But I honestly think it is an objective assessment -- and my desire to play the Sicilian again is simply an outgrowth of that conclusion....


Position after 8.O-O!? allowing 8...b4! 9.Na4 Bxe4!

In an earlier analysis of Guseinov's Anti-Paulsen Gambit (1. e4 c5 2. Nf3 e6 3. d4 cxd4 4. Nxd4 a6 5. Nc3 b5 6. g3 Bb7 7. Bg2 Nf6 8. O-O!?), I left several lines as unclear because I simply refused to believe that Guseinov didn't have some hidden resource for White, which -- if I just tried a little harder -- would eventually reveal itself. Well, I should have recognized then what I do now: there is no hidden resource. White is simply not doing that great if Black knows what he is doing. And if Black follows Palliser's excellent advice, he will.... After an extensive re-analysis, using Palliser and ICC master games as a guide, I am thoroughly convinced that Black is not just OK, he is better. And since White does not appear to have any improvements, this whole line begins to stink.... Unless you are playing Black, of course.

But you be the judge following this fascinating encounter between two 3200+ ICC blitz players. It's an amazing game, especially when you think about how it was all played in under 6 minutes.

GM Gad Guseinov (GGuseinov) - IM Alexander Zubov (Skriabin) [B43]

ICC 3 0/Internet Chess Club 2007


1. e4 c5 2. Nf3 e6 3. d4 cxd4 4. Nxd4 a6 5. Nc3 b5

5... d5?! 6. exd5 exd5 7. g3 Nf6 8. Bg2 Be7 9. O-O O-O 10. h3 Nc6 11. Be3 Be6 12. g4 Re8 13. g5! (13. Nce2 Rc8 14. c3 Ne5 15. b3 Ne4 16. Nxe6 fxe6 17. c4 Bc5 18. Nd4 Qd7 19. Re1 Bb4 0-1 KingFarouk-Ecwlapio/Internet Chess Club 2007 (51)) 13... Nd7 (13... Ne4 14. Nxe6 fxe6 15. Nxe4) 14. Nxd5 Bxg5 (14... Nxd4 15. Nxe7+ Qxe7 16. Qxd4) 15. Bxg5 (15. Nxe6 Rxe6 16. f4 Be7 17. f5 Rd6 18. Bf4) 15... Qxg5 16. Nxc6 bxc6 17. Nc7 Bxh3 18. Qf3 Bxg2 19. Qxg2 Qh6 20. Nxa8 Rxa8 21. Rfe1

 

6. g3

One interesting game worth noting went 6. a4!? b4 7. Na2 Bb7!? 8. c3 Bxe4 9. Nxb4 Bxb4 10. cxb4 Nf6 11. Be3 Nd5 12. b5 Nxe3 13. fxe3 O-O 14. Qd2 d5 15. bxa6 Nxa6 16. Bxa6!? Rxa6 17. O-O e5 18. Nf3 Rg6 19. b4 f5 20. a5 f4 21. b5 fxe3!? 22. Qxe3 Rf4 23. a6 Rfg4 (23... d4! 24. Qb3+ Bd5 25. a7 Bxb3 26. a8=Q) 24. g3 Qf6 25. a7 Rxg3+ 26. hxg3 Rxg3+ 27. Kh2 Black forfeits on time 1-0 Nostradamus-G-Sarakauskas/Internet Chess Club 2003, which is a great illustration of the battle between White's queenside majority and Black's kingside initiative rather common in this variation.

 

6... Bb7 7. Bg2 Nf6

a) 7... Bb4 8. O-O! (8. Bd2) 8... Bxc3 9. bxc3 Qxc3 10.Rb1 and White developed a strong initiative in 1-0 JSlaby-Klinch88/Internet Chess Club 2006 -- ignore the rest of the moves here, they are "java junk" generated by a conversion error...sorry. See the PGN. (9. Bf4) (d6 9. Nb3 O-O Qxd6 Qxc2 Ba3) 9... e5! Nd5 Rb3 Qc7 10. Ba3 Qxe5 Bxf8 Kxf8 Re1 Qd6 Nf5 e5 Black resigns (10. c4 e5 Nf5)

b) 7... b4!? 8. Na4 Qa5!? is intriguing, and Black has some success with the idea, but I don't trust it: 9. c3! (9. b3?! Nf6 10. Qe2 Nc6 11. Bb2 Nxd4 12. Bxd4 Qb5 13. Qd3 e5 14. Be3 d5 15. exd5 Qxd3 16. cxd3 Nxd5 17. Nb6 Rd8 18. Nxd5 Bxd5 19. Bxd5 Rxd5 0-1 KingFarouk-hias/Internet Chess Club 2006 (38)) 9... Nf6 10. O-O Bxe4 11. Bxe4 Nxe4 12. Re1 (12. cxb4 Bxb4 13. a3 Be7 14. b4 Qd8 15. Bf4 O-O 16. Rc1 d6 17. Qf3 d5 0-1 KingFarouk-Dworkin/Internet Chess Club 2006 (51)) 12... Nf6 13. Bd2! Be7 (13... bxc3 14. Nxc3) 14. cxb4 Qd8 15. a3 (15. Qf3 d5 16. Nc5 O-O 17. Rac1) 15... O-O 16. Rc1 Nd5 17. Nc5 d6 18. Ne4 Nf6 19. Qe2 d5 20. Ng5 h6? 21. Ngxe6! fxe6 22. Nxe6 Qd7 (22... Qb6 23. Nc7 Ra7 24. Qxe7) 23. Rc7! Qb5 24. Rxe7 Black resigns 1-0 KingFarouk-Tarvo/Internet Chess Club 2005

 

8. O-O!?

The critical test. If White cannot succeed with this gambit, then Black is doing fine as I show in my earlier article.

 

8... b4!

As Palliser notes, this is surely the most critical reply. Other moves tend to get Black into some trouble.

a) 8... Bb4 9. e5! Bxg2 10. Kxg2 Bxc3 11. bxc3 Nd5 12. Qg4 Kf8 13. f4! h5 14. Qf3 Nc6 15. f5! Nxd4 (15... Nxe5 16. Qe4) 16. cxd4 Qc7 17. c4! (opening the c-file, which will become the main route for the invasion) 17... bxc4 18. Ba3+ Kg8 19. Bd6 Qa7 20. Bc5 Qc7 21. Rac1 Qc6 22. Kg1 exf5 23. Rxc4 Rc8 24. Rfc1 Nb6 25. Qxc6 Rxc6 (Black defends with great tenacity) 26. Rb4! (now over to the b-file!) 26... Rhh6 27. Rcb1 (27. Rf1!?) 27... Nd5 28. Rb8+ Kh7 29. R1b7 Rc7 30. Rxc7 Nxc7 31. Rd8 Ne6 32. Rxd7 Nxc5 33. dxc5 Re6 34. Rd5 f6 35. exf6 Rxf6 36. Rd6 Kg6 37. Rb6 (now, who said that Tal never learned to play the endgame because he didn't reach it enough?) 37... Kf7 38. Kf2 Re6 39. c6 Re4 40. Rxa6 f4 41. Ra5 fxg3+ 42. hxg3 h4 43. Rc5 hxg3+ 44. Kxg3 Re8 45. Kf4 Ra8 46. Ke5 Ke7 47. Rd5 Ra7 48. a4 g5 49. a5 g4 50. Rb5 g3 51. Rb7+ Rxb7 52. cxb7 g2 53. b8=Q g1=Q 54. Qc7+ Ke8 55. Qc8+ Ke7 56. Qc7+ Ke8 57. Kd6 Qd4+ 58. Kc6 Qe4+ 59. Kb6 Qb4+ 60. Ka6 Qa4 61. Kb7 Qb4+ 62. Qb6 Qe7+ 63. Kc8 Qe4 64. Qb5+ Kf8 65. a6 Qe6+ 66. Kc7 Qe7+ 67. Qd7 Qc5+ 68. Qc6 Qe3 69. Kb7 Qe7+ 70. Kc8 Qe3 71. Qf6+ Kg8 72. Qd8+ Kh7 73. Qc7+ Kh6 74. a7 Qe4 75. Qb6+ 1-0 Tal,M-Taimanov,M/Riga 1958

 

b) 8... d6 9. Re1! Nbd7

A major alternative is 9... Qc7 against which White has a number of moves, including a scary piece sac that seems to work: 10. a4 b4 (10... bxa4 11. Nxa4 Be7 12. c4 O-O 13. b3 Nc6 14. Bb2 Nd7 15. Nxc6 Bxc6 16. Nc3 Bf6 17. Qc2 Rfd8 18. Rad1 Rab8 19. Ba3 Qa5 20. Nb1 Nf8 21. Re2 Qb6 22. Bxd6 Qxb3 23. Qxb3 Rxb3 24. e5 Bxg2 25. Kxg2 Bg5 26. f4 Bh6 27. c5 Rc8 28. Ra2 Rc6 29. Nd2 Rd3 30. Rb1 Nd7 31. Rb7 Nf8 32. Rb8 g6 33. Ne4 1-0 Lalic,S-Griffiths,R/Great Yarmouth ENG 2007) 11. Na2!?

(Better 11. Nd5! exd5 12. exd5+ Kd8 13. Bg5 Nbd7 14. Nc6+ (14. c3 b3 15. Nc6+ Bxc6 16. dxc6 Nc5 17. Bxf6+ gxf6 18. Qd5 (18. Qd4 Be7 19. Rad1 Kc8 20. Qc4 Rf8 21. Bh3+ Kb8 22. Bd7 Bd8 23. Qg4 Ne6 24. Rxe6 fxe6 25. Qg7 Be7 26. Qxe7 Ka7 27. Qxd6 Qxd6 28. Rxd6 Kb6 29. Rxe6 f5 30. Re7 f4 31. Rxh7 f3 32. h4 Rf6 33. g4 Rd6 34. Kh2 Rd2 35. Kg3 Rxb2 36. Bf5 Rc2 37. Rb7+ Black resigns 1-0 GGuseinov-ChessFun/Internet Chess Club 2007) 18... Rg8 19. Rad1 Rg5 20. Qc4 Ne6 21. Bd5 Re5 22. Qh4 Ng5 23. Qd4 Be7 24. f4 Ne6 25. Qd3 Rxe1+ 26. Rxe1 Nf8 27. Qf5 Rb8 28. Qh5 Ra8 29. Qxf7 Ra7 30. Kg2 a5 31. h4 Kc8 32. c4 Kb8 33. Qe8+ Qd8 34. Qxd8+ Bxd8 35. Re8 Black resigns 1-0 talismanchik-junior/Internet Chess Club 2007) 14... Bxc6 15. dxc6 Nc5 16. Bxf6+ gxf6 17. Qd4 Be7 18. Qxb4 Ke8 (18... Kc8 19. Bd5) 19. Qh4 Guseinov)

11... e5 12. Nf5 g6 (12... Nc6 13. c3 a5 14. cxb4 axb4 15. Bg5 Nd7 16. Rc1 g6 17. Ne3 Qa5 18. Nd5 Bg7 19. Naxb4 Rc8 20. Nxc6 Bxc6 21. Ne7 Black resigns 1-0 GGuseinov-junior/Internet Chess Club 2007) 13. Nh6 Nc6 14. Bg5 Be7 15. Rc1 Qa5 16. c3 bxc3 17. Qb3! Nd8 18. Nxc3 Bc6 19. Red1 Qc7 20. Qa3 Qb8 21. b4 Kf8 22. Qb2 Ne6 23. Be3 Kg7 24. Nd5 Bxd5 25. exd5 Nd4 26. Rxd4 exd4 27. Qxd4 Bd8 28. g4 Bb6 29. Nf5+ gxf5 30. Bh6+ 1-0 Berelovich,A-Van der Weide,K/Solingen 2005.

10. e5! dxe5 (10... Bxg2 11. exf6! Bb7 (11... Bh3 12. Qh5 Qxf6 13. Be3 Bf5 14. Nd5 Qd8 15. Bg5 Guseinov) 12. fxg7 Bxg7 13. Nxe6 fxe6 14. Rxe6+ Kf8 15. Rxd6 Guseinov) 11. Nxe6 (11. Bxb7 exd4 12. Bxa8) 11... Qb8 12. Nxf8 Kxf8 13. Nd5 h5 14. b3 h4 15. g4 h3 (15... b4 16. g5!) 16. Ba3+ Ke8 17. Bf3 Rh4 18. Ne3 b4 19. Bxb4 Bxf3 20. Qxf3 e4 21. Qg3 Ne5 22. Rad1 Qxb4 23. Qxe5+ Kf8 24. g5 Rh5 25. Kh1 Nh7 26. Rg1 f6 27. Qf4 Rxg5 28. Rd7 Qb5 29. Rxg5 Qe2 30. Qxe4 1-0 Kupreichik,V-Marjanovic,S/Nis 1994

 

9. Na4

I agree with Palliser that White cannot succeed with 9. Nd5? exd5 10. exd5 Bc5 11. Re1+ Kf8 12. Nf5 d6 13. Bg5 Nbd7 14. Qd2 h6 15. Nxh6 gxh6 16. Bxh6+ Rxh6 17. Qxh6+ Kg8 18. Rad1 Bxf2+ 19. Kh1 Bxe1 20. Rd4 Qf8 White resigns 0-1 CRISTIANDEBOCA-Gejza/Internet Chess Club 2007

 

9... Bxe4!

The best way.

a) 9... Nxe4?! 10. Re1 d5 (10... f5? 11. Bxe4 Bxe4 12. Rxe4 fxe4 13. Qh5+ g6 14. Qe5 Rg8 15. Qxe4 Ra7 16. Nxe6 Qe7 17. Be3) (10... Nd6? 11. Bxb7 Nxb7 12. Qf3 Qc7 13. Bf4 d6 14. Nc5!) (10... Qa5? 11. Rxe4! Qxa4 (11... Bxe4 12. Bxe4) 12. Re5! d5 (12... Bxg2? 13. b3 traps the queen) 13. Nxe6 (13. Qh5!? g6 14. Nxe6! gxh5 (14... fxe6 15. Rxe6+ Kf7 16. Qe5 Nd7 17. Qxh8 Kxe6 18. Qxh7) 15. Nc5+ Be7 16. Nxa4) 13... fxe6 14. Rxe6+ Kd8 (14... Kf7?? 15. Bxd5) 15. Bf4 (15. Bxd5 Qd7 16. Bg5+ Kc8 17. Bxb7+ Kxb7 18. Qf3+ Nc6 19. Rae1 Kb6) 15... Qd7 16. Bh3 Bc5 17. Qh5) 11. Nxe6! fxe6 12. Qh5+ g6 (12... Kd7 13. Bxe4 (13. Be3!?) 13... dxe4 14. Bg5! Be7 (14... Qc7 15. Bf4!) 15. Rad1+ Bd5 16. Bxe7 Kxe7 17. Rxe4 Bxe4 18. Qg5+ Guseinov) 13. Qe5 Qd7! (13... Qf6 14. Rxe4 Qxe5 15. Rxe5 Nd7 (15... Kf7 16. Bh3! Bd6 (16... Nc6 17. Bxe6+ Kf6 18. Bg5+ Kxe5 19. Re1+ Kd6 20. Bf4+ Ne5 (20... Ke7 21. Bc8+) 21. Bxe5+ Kxe6 22. Bxh8+ Kf7 23. Nb6 Re8 24. Rxe8 Kxe8 25. Bd4) (16... Bc8 17. Nb6 Bg7 18. Bf4 Bxe5 19. Bxe5 Nd7 20. Bxh8 Nxb6 21. Bd4 Nc4 22. b3 Na3 23. Rc1 e5 24. Bxc8 Rxc8 25. Bxe5 Rxc2 26. Rxc2 Nxc2 27. Kf1 Ke6 28. Bb2 d4 29. Ke2 Kd5 30. Kd2 Na3 31. Bxa3 bxa3 32. Kd3 g5 33. f3 h5 34. f4 gxf4 35. gxf4 h4 36. h3 a5 37. f5 Ke5 38. f6 Kxf6 39. Kxd4 Kf5 40. Kc5 Kf4 41. Kb5 Kg3 42. Kxa5 Kxh3 43. b4 Kg4 44. b5 h3 45. b6 h2 46. b7 h1=Q 47. b8=Q Qd5+ 48. Ka4 Qxa2 49. Qb4+ Kf3 50. Qxa3+ Qxa3+ 51. Kxa3 Game drawn because neither player has mating material 1/2-1/2 ChessIPO1-clearbluewater/Internet Chess Club 2007) 17. Rxe6 Bc8 18. Rxd6 Bxh3 19. Rxd5 ( 19. Nb6 Ra7 20. Nxd5) 19... Nc6 20. Bg5 Rhe8 21. Rd7+?? Bxd7 White resigns 0-1 chavo-BMW/Internet Chess Club 2007) 16. Rxe6+ Kf7 17. Re1 1/2-1/2 Cubero Ferreiro,R-Vehi Bach,V/Pontevedra 2002 (52)) 14. Qxh8 Qxa4 15. f3! (15. c4!? bxc3 16. f3 Nc5 17. Bh3 Nbd7 18. Bg5 Kf7 19. Rxe6 Nxe6 20. Qxh7+ Ng7 21. Be6+ Kxe6 22. Qxg6+ Ke5 23. Re1+ Kd4 24. Be3+ Kc4 25. b3+ Qxb3 26. axb3+ Kb4 27. Qg4+ 1-0 Plaskett,J-Hillarp Persson,T/Hampstead 1998) 15... Nc5 16. Bh3 Nbd7 (16... Qd7 17. Be3! Guseinov) 17. Bg5 ( 17. Qxh7) 17... Qc6 (17... h6!?) 18. Qxh7 e5 19. Re2 e4 20. fxe4 dxe4 21. Rf1 Ne5 22. Qh8 Nf7 23. Rxf7 1-0 Kupreichik,V-Gdanski,P/Leningrad 1989

 

b) 9... d5?! 10. e5 Ne4 11. Be3 Nd7 12. f4?! (12. f3 Nec5 13. Nxc5 Bxc5 14. f4) 12... Ndc5 13. Nxc5 Bxc5 14. Kh1 (14. f5!?) 14... O-O 15. Qg4 Bxd4 16. Bxd4 Rc8 17. Rfc1 Rc4 18. Qd1 Qc7 19. b3 Rc6 20. a3 Rc8 21. axb4 Rxc2 22. Rxc2 Qxc2 23. Qxc2 Rxc2 24. Bf1 h5 25. Bxa6 Bxa6 26. Rxa6 Nd2 27. b5 Nxb3 28. Bg1 Rb2 29. b6 Nd2 30. Bd4 Rb1+ 31. Kg2 Kh7 32. Ra1 Rb3 33. Ra7 Kg6 34. h3 Rb4 35. Bc5 Rb5 36. b7 Ne4 37. Bd6 Nxd6 38. exd6 Kf6 39. d7 Ke7 40. Ra8 1-0 Shchukin,D-Mishuchkov,N/St Petersburg 2005

 

10. Bxe4 Nxe4 11. Re1 Nc5!

As Palliser notes, this is now the critical response and it seems fully sufficient.

 

 

a) 11... d5? is the old move, which Guseinov worked out a refutation against (as I demonstrated in an article last year): 12. c4! bxc3 (12... Nf6 13. cxd5 Nxd5 14. Nxe6 fxe6 15. Rxe6+ Be7 16. Bg5 Nc6 17. Rc1!) 13. Nxc3 Nxc3










(13... 13... Be7!? 14. Nxe4 dxe4 15. Bf4!? ( 15. Rxe4! Qd5?! 16. Qa4+ Nd7 17. Nc6) 15... Bf6 (15... Qd5 16. Qa4+ Nd7 17. Rad1 Qb7 18. Nb3 Rd8 19. Na5) 16. Rxe4 O-O 17. Qa4 Qd5 18. Rae1 Nd7 19. Qc6 Nc5 20. Bd6 Nxe4 21. Bxf8 Bxd4 0-1 Beach,P-Humphrey,J/Queenstown NZL 2006 (21)) 14. Qh5!! First played in Guthrie-Humphrey, Australian Open 2005 14... Ne4 (14... Qd7 15. Nxe6! transposes to the main line below. Alternatives, while interesting, are not as promising:(15. Rxe6+!? Kd8 16. Bg5+ Kc7 (16... Kc8 17. Re3) 17. Re3 Nb5 18. Bf4+ Kb7 19. Rc1) (15. bxc3 g6 16. Qe5 Rg8 17. Rb1 Qd6 18. Qe2 Nc6 19. Bf4) 15... Ne4 16. Nc7+ Qxc7 17. Qxd5 etc. arrives at the main line below.) (14... g6? 15. Qe5 Rg8 16. Nxe6 Bd6 (16... fxe6 17. Qxe6+ Qe7 18. Qc8+! Guseinov) 17. Nxd8+ Bxe5 18. Rxe5+ Kxd8 19. bxc3) 15. Nxe6 Qb6










16. Nc7+! Qxc7 17. Qxd5 'etc. arrives at the main line below.' 17... f5 (17... Nc6 (probably best according to Guseinov) 18. Qxe4+ (18. Bf4 Qd7 19. Qxe4+ Be7 20. Rad1 Qb7 21. Bd6 O-O 22. Bxe7 Rfe8 23. Qf3 Rxe7 24. Rxe7 Qxe7 25. Qxc6 Guseinov) 18... Be7 19. Bf4! (19. Bg5 O-O (19... f6 20. Rac1 fxg5 21. Rxc6 Qd8 22. Qc4!) 20. Bxe7 Rfe8 21. Bd6!) 19... Qd7? (19... Qb7 20. Bd6 O-O 21. Bxe7 Rae8 22. Qf3 Rxe7 23. Rxe7 Qxe7 24. Qxc6) 20. Rad1 Qb7 21. Bd6 O-O 22. Bxe7 Rfe8 23. Qf3 Rac8 24. Ba3 Rxe1+ 25. Rxe1 h6?? (25... Qb5 26. b3) 26. Re7 1-0 Safarli,E-Yagiz,Y/Kusadasi TUR 2006 (26)) (17... Ra7?! 18. Qxe4+ Be7 (18... Qe7 19. Qa4+) 19. Be3 Rb7 (19... f5 20. Qe6 1-0 Guthrie,A-Humphrey,J/Mount Buller AUS 2005) 20. Rac1 Qd7 21. Red1! Rb4 22. Qc2 (22. Qe5! f6 23. Qh5+ g6 24. Rxd7 gxh5 25. Rxe7+ Kxe7 26. Bc5+) 22... Qc6 23. Qxc6+ Nxc6 24. Rxc6 O-O 25. Rd7 Bf6 26. b3 Ra8 27. Ra7! 1-0 Vyskocil,N-Langner,L/Czech Rep CZE 2006 (27)) (17... Qc6?? 18. Rxe4+ Be7 19. Rxe7+! Kxe7 20. Bg5+ f6 21. Re1+ Kf8 22. Qd8+ Kf7 23. Re7+ Kg6 24. Qxh8 Kxg5 25. Qxg7+ 1-0 Guseinov-Khagani, Abadan Iran 2005) 18. Qxf5 Be7 19. Qxe4 Ra7 20. Be3 (20. Bg5!?) 20... O-O 21. Rac1 Qb7 22. Bxa7 Qxa7 23. Re2 Bd8??










24. Rc8! Nd7 25. Rxd8 According to Guseinov, Mamedov took only 10 minutes to prepare this line (with Guseinov's help, of course) shortly before their match. Thanks partly to this game, they won 3-1. 1-0 Mamedov, R-Lie,K/Turin ITA 2006

 

b) 11... Nf6!? may also be perfectly good: 12. Qf3 (12. Bg5!? is preferred by Guseinov in some games) 12... d5 (12... Ra7 13. Bf4 (13. Be3!?) 13... Be7 (13... d6 14. Nf5) 14. Nf5 exf5 15. Rxe7+ Qxe7 16. Bxb8 d5 17. Bxa7 (17. Nb6!? Rb7 18. Nc8 Qd8 19. Nd6+ Kf8 20. Nxb7 Qxb8 21. Nc5) 17... Qxa7 18. Re1+ Ne4 19. c4) 13. Bg5 Be7 (13... Nbd7! 14. Qe2!? h6 (14... Nc5!) 15. Nxe6 fxe6 16. Qxe6+ Be7 17. Bf4 Ra7 18. Bd6 Nf8) 14. Bxf6!? Bxf6 15. Nxe6 fxe6 16. Rxe6+ Kf7 17. Rae1 Ra7 18. Nb6 Rf8 19. Nxd5 Kg8 20. Nxf6+ gxf6 21. Qb3 Raf7 22. Qxb4

 

12. Qf3

Guseinov's most recent choice is 12. Nxc5 Bxc5 13. Be3!? , though I don't find it particularly persuasive.(13. Qf3 could transpose to the game, but as Palliser points out, Black can then consider 13... Bxd4!? (Not 13... d5? 14. Nxe6! fxe6 15. Rxe6+ Be7 16. Bg5 Rf8 17. Qe2 (17. Qh5+!) 17... Nc6 18. Re1 Rf7 1-0 trophyking-JSlaby/Internet Chess Club 2007 (23)) ( but probably best is 13... Ra7 transposing to the game continuation.) 14. Qxa8 O-O 15. Qf3 Nc6 with sufficient compensation for the Exchange.) 13... Qb6! 14. Qg4 O-O 15. Rad1 Nc6? (15... Rc8!) 16. Nxc6 Bxe3 (16... dxc6 17. Bh6) 17. Ne7+ Kh8 18. Rxe3 d5 19. Qh4 Rae8 20. Rd4? (20. Rde1 Qd8 21. Nc6) 20... h6 21. Rg4 Qc5 22. Re5 Qxe7 23. Qxe7 Rxe7 24. Rxb4 Rc8 25. c3= and eventually 0-1 GGuseinov-Inspektor/Internet Chess Club 2007 (54). Obviously, both sides missed chances, but I think Black could improve earlier than White!

 

12... Ra7 13. Nxc5 Bxc5 14. Nb3

I don't think White has better at this point. And it is difficult to imagine how he improves earlier.

a) 14. Be3?! Qb6! 15. Qg4 O-O 16. Rad1 d6 17. h4 Kh8 18. h5 h6 19. Qf3 Nd7 20. Nc6 Rc7 21. Rxd6 Ne5 22. Nxe5 Qxd6 23. Bf4 Qb6 24. Ng4 Qb7 25. Qe2 Rd7 26. Bxh6 Rd5 27. Be3 Rxh5 28. Nh2 Rd5 29. Nf3 Bxe3 30. Qxe3 Rfd8 31. Qe4 R8d7 32. Qh4+ Kg8 33. Kg2 Rd4 34. Qh3 Rd1 35. Re5 R7d5 36. Re4 Qb5 37. Ne1 Rh5 38. Qg4 Qd5 39. Nf3 Rhh1 40. Qf4 Qh5 41. Qg4 Qd5 42. Qf4 f5 43. Qb8+ Kh7 0-1 Khakimov,T-Bryzgalin,K/Voronezh RUS 2004

 

b) 14. Nf5!? O-O! Palliser

 

c) 14. Qg4 Qf6

 

14... Bb6!

Fortunately, this move is sufficient. Others lead to advantage for White.

 

a) 14... Rc7?! 15. Bf4! O-O (15... d6 16. Rad1) (15... Rc6 16. Nxc5 Rxc5 17. Qe4 (17. Bd6 Rb5 18. c4 bxc3 19. Qxc3 f6 20. Rad1 Nc6 21. a4 Rb7 22. b4 Kf7 23. Qc4 Qa8 24. b5 (24. Qe2) 24... axb5 25. axb5 Ne7 26. Bxe7 Kxe7 27. Rxd7+ (27. Qg4) 27... Rxd7 28. Qxe6+ Kd8 29. Qb6+ Rc7 30. Rd1+ Kc8 31. Qe6+ Kb7 32. Qd5+ Kb8 33. Qd6 Kc8 34. Qe6+ Kb7 35. Qd5+ Kb8 36. Qd6= 1/2-1/2 Gipslis,A-Kunz,K/Crailsheim 1999) 17... Nc6 18. Bd6) 16. Bxc7 Qxc7 17. Nxc5 (17. c3!) 17... Qxc5 18. c3 Nc6 (18... bxc3 19. Rac1) 19. Rac1 h6 20. b3 bxc3 21. Qxc3 Qf5 22. Red1 Ne5 23. Qc5?! (23. f4!) 23... Nf3+ (23... d5) 24. Kg2 d5 25. Rc3? (25. Qe3) 25... Nh4+! and I lost trying to find a reasonable continuation for White. 0-1 goeller-anon2/ Internet Chess Club 2007

 

b) 14... d6 gives White too many chances after 15. Qh5! (Threatening to regain the pawn at c5 or e6 with advantage) 15... O-O (15... Nd7? 16. Rxe6+ Kf8 17. Re2 (17. Bg5!) 17... Nf6 18. Qf3 h5 19. h3 (19. Bg5) 19... Re7 20. Nxc5 dxc5 21. Be3 Ne4 22. Rae1 Re6 23. Bxc5+! Nxc5 24. Rxe6 Nxe6 25. Rxe6 g6? 26. Rxg6 Black resigns 1-0 KingFarouk-Gejza/Internet Chess Club 2007) 16. Nxc5 dxc5 17. Qxc5 Rc7 (17... Rb7!? 18. Bf4 Rb5 19. Qe3 and White's advantage, if any, is minimal -- consisting of the Bishop versus Black's Knight and the possibility of getting a passed pawn on the queenside.) 18. Qxb4 Rxc2 19. Qb3 (19. Qe4) 19... Rc5 20. Be3 Rb5 21. Qc3 '' 21... Qd5 22. Bd4!? f6 23. b4! a5 24. a3 axb4 25. axb4 e5? (25... Rd8 26. Bc5 Nc6) 26. Bc5 Rc8 (26... Rd8?? 27. Red1 Qxd1+ 28. Rxd1 Rxd1+ 29. Kg2) 27. Red1 Qc6 28. Rd6 Qb7? 29. Qc4+ Kh8 30. Qd3 (30. Ra7!) 30... Nc6 31. Ra7! Qb8 32. Rxg7!! 1-0 Antal,G-Szieberth,A/Budapest 2000

 

c) 14... Be7? 15. Be3 Rc7 16. Bb6 and White picks up the Exchange, though I have found the resulting ending difficult to win for White.

 

15. Qg4

White might recover his pawn this way -- if Black allows it -- but he gets the worse game. However, I do not see much of an alternative.

a) 15. Bd2 (This seems a logical move, developing with threat) 15... Qe7!? (15... Nc6 16. a3 bxa3 17. Rxa3 transposes to the line below) (15... a5 16. a3 a4 17. Nc1 Rc7 18. Bxb4 Rxc2 19. Re2 Rxe2 20. Nxe2 Nc6 21. Bd6 Bc7 22. Bxc7 Qxc7 23. Qg4 O-O!? 24. Qxa4 Qb7 25. b4) 16. Qf4!? Nc6 17. a3 bxa3 18. Rxa3 O-O 19. Rea1 e5

 

b) 15. a3 bxa3! (15... Nc6!? 16. axb4 Nxb4 Palliser 17. Ra4! (17. Qc3?! Qf6!) 17... Nc6! (17... Nxc2? 18. Re2 Rc7 19. Bf4 and Black's Knight is in big trouble.) (17... a5?! 18. Bd2 Nxc2? 19. Rc1 Nb4 20. Bxb4 axb4 21. Rxa7 Bxa7 22. Qb7) 18. Bd2 O-O! and it is difficult to believe that White can generate real kingside play.) 16. Rxa3 O-O!? and I don't see what White has to hope for even if he recovers his pawn eventually.

 

c) 15. Bf4 Qf6! 16. Nd2 O-O 17. Bd6 Qxf3 18. Nxf3 Rc8

 

15... O-O!?

Black just gets on with development and trusts in his longterm attacking chances on the kingside, but 15... Qf6 is also possible, seeking to hold onto the extra pawn.

 

16. Qxb4 Nc6 17. Qg4 f5!

17... d5? 18. Bg5! (18. c3 Qf6 19. Bg5 Qg6 White resigns 0-1 KingFarouk-barlov/Internet Chess Club 2006 (25)) 18... Qd6 19. Bf6

 

18. Qe2 a5

18... e5 19. Be3 d5

 

19. a4

19. Be3 a4! 20. Nd2 Bxe3 21. Qxe3 f4! 22. Qe4 (22. gxf4 Ra5) 22... fxg3 23. hxg3 Qb6 24. Qe3 Qxb2 25. c3 Qb5 26. Ne4 Qh5 27. Nd6 Ra5 28. f4 Qh6 29. Kg2 e5!? 30. Qd3! Qe6 31. f5 Qd5+?! (31... Rd5 32. fxe6 Rxd3) 32. Qxd5+ Rxd5 33. Rad1 Rxd1 34. Rxd1 Rb8 35. Ne4 Rb2+ 36. Kf3 Rxa2 37. Rxd7 Rb2? 38. Rc7! Rb6 39. Ng5! Rb8 40. Rxc6 Ra8 41. Rb6 a3 42. Rb1 Black forfeits on time 1-0 GGuseinov-Skriabin/Internet Chess Club 2006 -- another game that Black should have won.

 

19... Qf6 20. c3 Rb7 21. Nd2 f4! 22. Ne4 Qg6 23. Kh1 f3 24. Qf1 Ne5

24... d5 25. Ng5 e5

 

25. h3 Qh5 26. Nd6 Ng4?!

26... Rbb8 27. Rd1 (27. Kg1 Nd3) 27... Ng4

 

27. Nxb7 Nxf2+ 28. Kh2 Ng4+ 29. Kh1 f2

29... Qd5

 

30. Rd1! Rf3 31. Bf4

31. Kg2 Qe5

 

 

31... e5?

The losing move; 31... Ne3 32. Bxe3 Rxg3 appears to be a deadly attack, which will cost White at least his Queen. But what do you expect of Black with 3 minutes for the entire game?

 

32. Qc4+! Kf8 33. Qc8+ Qe8 34. Qxe8+ Kxe8 35. Nd6+ Kf8 36. hxg4 exf4 37. gxf4 Rxf4 38. Nf5 Rxg4 39. Nd4 Ke7 40. Rf1 Bxd4 41. cxd4 Rxd4 42. Rxf2 Rb4 43. Re1+ Kd8 44. Rd2 Rxa4 45. Red1 Rh4+ 46. Kg2 Rg4+ 47. Kh3

Black resigns. Obviously, the result had little to do with the opening...

1-0

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Game in PGN

Copyright © 2007 Michael Goeller

Bibliography

Goeller, Michael. Two Knights Sicilian, Part Four: Guseinovv's Anti-Paulsen Gambit

Guseinov's Anti-Paulsen

Interview with Gadir Guseinov

Palliser, Richard. Fighting the Anti-Sicilians. Everyman 2007. pp. 77-80 especially.