Mating Patterns I

Mate with Bishop and Rook

Patterns or motifs are the cornerstone of chess knowledge. Learning them is essential to improved tactical and combinative ability, just as memorizing basic math is essential to performing more advanced equations. The basic motifs, especially mating patterns, also serve as a paradigm for the aquisition of further knowledge; in a sense, their study teaches students how to learn chess. The mate with Bishop and Rook fits well with an introduction to "The Chess Instructor's Favorite Game": Morphy vs. the Duke and the Count at the Paris Opera House (our first example below). Looking at these patterns in the context of actual games helps to integrate that knowledge with other chess ideas.

The problems below range from easy to very difficult (for beginners anyway). Seeing the pattern is the key to the solution, though in the most advanced problems it is not necessarily the solution itself. Enjoy!

Paul Morphy - The Duke and the Count [C41]

At the Paris Opera House/Paris 1858


1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 d6 3. d4 Bg4 4. dxe5 Bxf3 5. Qxf3 dxe5 6. Bc4 Nf6 7. Qb3 Qe7 8. Nc3 c6 9. Bg5 b5 10. Nxb5 cxb5 11. Bxb5+ Nbd7 12. O-O-O Rd8 13. Rxd7 Rxd7 14. Rd1 Qe6 15. Bxd7+ Nxd7










16. Qb8+!! Nxb8 17. Rd8# 1-0


Maczuski - Ignatz Kolisch [C45]

Paris 1864


1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. d4 exd4 4. Nxd4 Qh4 5. Nc3 Bb4 6. Qd3 Nf6 7. Nxc6 dxc6 8. Bd2 Bxc3 9. Bxc3 Nxe4 10. Qd4 Qe7 11. O-O-O Qg5+ 12. f4 Qxf4+ 13. Bd2 Qg4??










Necessary was 13... Qh4 14. Re1 but White is still winning.

14. Qd8+!! Kxd8 15. Bg5+ Ke8 16. Rd8# 1-0


Richard Reti - Saviely Tartakower [B15]

Vienna 1910


1. e4 c6 2. d4 d5 3. Nc3 dxe4 4. Nxe4 Nf6 5. Qd3 e5 6. dxe5 Qa5+ 7. Bd2 Qxe5 8. O-O-O Nxe4??










9. Qd8+!! Kxd8 10. Bg5+ Ke8

Or 10... Kc7 11. Bd8#

11. Rd8# 1-0


Sherard & Wilmot - Burn [C11]

Liverpool 1897


1. e4 e6 2. d4 d5 3. Nc3 Nf6 4. Bg5 dxe4 5. Nxe4 Nbd7 6. Bd3 Be7 7. Nxf6+ Nxf6 8. Nf3 c5 9. dxc5 Bxc5 10. Qd2 Qb6 11. O-O-O Bxf2 12. Rhf1 Bc5 13. Ne5 Be7 14. g4 h6 15. Bh4 Nxg4?










16. Bb5+! Qxb5?

Or 16... Kf8 17. Ng6+ Kg8 18. Nxe7+ Kh7 19. Rxf7 Qxb5 20. Qd4 Qe5 21. Qxg4

17. Qd8+ Bxd8 18. Rxd8# 1-0


Aaron Nimzowitsch - Simon Alapin [B29]

Vilnius 1912


1. e4 c5 2. Nf3 Nf6 3. Nc3 d5 4. exd5 Nxd5 5. d4 e6 6. Nxd5 Qxd5 7. Be3 cxd4 8. Nxd4 a6 9. Be2 Qxg2 10. Bf3 Qg6 11. Qd2 e5 12. O-O-O exd4 13. Bxd4 Nc6?

13... Be7 14. Rhe1

14. Bf6!! Qxf6 15. Rhe1+

15. Bxc6+! bxc6 16. Rhe1+ Be7 17. Qd8#

15... Be7 16. Bxc6+ Kf8










16... Bd7 17. Qxd7+ Kf8 18. Qd8+!! Rxd8 19. Rxd8+ Bxd8 20. Re8#

17. Qd8+ Bxd8 18. Re8# 1-0


Onderka - NN [D00]

Austria 1913


1. d4 d5 2. Nc3 Nf6 3. e4 dxe4 4. Bc4 Bg4 5. f3 exf3 6. Nxf3 e6 7. Bg5 c5 8. O-O Bxf3 9. Qxf3 Qxd4+ 10. Kh1 Nc6 11. Rad1 Qxc4 12. Bxf6 e5 13. Bg5 Qe6?

Necessary was 13... f6 14. Bxf6!

14. Nb5! Rc8










Or 14... Bd6 15. Rxd6

15. Nc7+!! Rxc7 16. Qxc6+!! Rxc6

a) 16... Qd7 17. Rxd7 Rxd7 18. Qc8+ Rd8 19. Qxd8#

b) 16... bxc6 17. Rd8#

c) 16... Qxc6 17. Rd8#

17. Rd8# 1-0


John Schulten - Bernhard Horwitz [C26]

London 1846


1. e4 e5 2. Bc4 Nf6 3. Nc3 b5 4. Bxb5 Bc5 5. d3 c6 6. Bc4 Qb6 7. Qe2 d5 8. exd5 O-O 9. Ne4 Nxe4 10. dxe4 Bxf2+ 11. Qxf2 Qb4+ 12. Bd2 Qxc4 13. Qf3 f5 14. exf5 Bxf5 15. Qb3










15... Qf1+!! 16. Kxf1 Bd3+ 17. Ke1 Rf1# 0-1


Kaldegg - Zeissel [C52]

Vienna 1903


1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. Bc4 Bc5 4. b4 Bxb4 5. c3 Ba5 6. d4 exd4 7. Qb3 Qf6 8. e5 Nxe5 9. Nxe5 Qxe5+ 10. Kd1 Qh5+ 11. Be2 Qg6 12. Re1 Kd8 13. Ba3 d6 14. Qb5 Qf5??










14... Bf5

15. Qe8+ Kxe8 16. Bb5+ Kf8

16... Kd8 17. Re8#

17. Re8# 1-0


Frank James Marshall - Theodore Von Scheve [C39]

Monaco 1904


1. e4 e5 2. f4 exf4 3. Nf3 g5 4. h4 g4 5. Ne5 Nf6 6. Bc4 d5 7. exd5 Bd6 8. O-O Bxe5 9. Re1 Qe7 10. c3 f3 11. d4 Ne4 12. Rxe4 Bh2+ 13. Kxh2 Qxe4 14. g3 O-O 15. Bd3 Qxd5 16. c4 Qh5 17. Nc3 c6 18. Ne4 f5 19. Nd6 f4 20. Qe1 fxg3+ 21. Qxg3 Nd7 22. Bg5 f2 23. Bf5 Nb6 24. Nxc8 Raxc8 25. Be6+ Rf7 26. Rf1 Re8 27. Bxf7+ Qxf7 28. Qxg4 Qg6 29. Rxf2 Nxc4 30. h5! Re4?










31. Bh6!!

and Black can only avoid 32.Rf8# by surrendering tremendous material -- after which he is still mated quickly.

1-0

Oldrich Duras - Adolf Olland [C12]

Carlsbad 1907


1. e4 e6 2. d4 d5 3. Nc3 Nf6 4. Bg5 Bb4 5. e5 h6 6. Bd2 Bxc3 7. bxc3 Ne4 8. Qg4 Kf8 9. Bc1 c5 10. Bd3 Qa5 11. Ne2 cxd4 12. O-O dxc3 13. Bxe4 dxe4 14. Qxe4 Nc6 15. Rd1 g6 16. Bf4 Ne7 17. Rd6 Nd5 18. Be3 Kg7 19. Qh4 Qc7 20. Rd1 b6 21. R1xd5 exd5 22. Qf6+ Kh7 23. Bxh6 Rg8 24. Qh4 Bg4










25. Nf4?

White missed mate in 3: 25. Bf8+ Bh5 26. Qxh5+!! gxh5 27. Rh6# But I hope you spotted it, despite the tricky angle!

25... Rh8 26. Nxd5 Qxd6 27. exd6 Bh5 28. Be3 Rad8 29. Qg5 1-0


Yuri Gusev - Vladimir Antoshin [D30]

Moscow 1952


1. d4 Nf6 2. c4 e6 3. Nf3 d5 4. e3 Be7 5. Nc3 O-O 6. Bd3 dxc4 7. Bxc4 c5 8. O-O a6 9. Qe2 b5 10. Bb3 Bb7 11. Rd1 Qc7 12. Bc2 Nc6 13. a4 b4 14. Ne4 Nxe4 15. Bxe4 Na5 16. Bd3 Nb3 17. Rb1 cxd4 18. exd4 Rac8 19. Be3 Qc6 20. d5 exd5 21. Bxh7+ Kxh7 22. Qd3+ Qg6 23. Qxb3 d4 24. Bxd4 Rc3 25. bxc3 Bxf3 26. g3 Rh8 27. Re1 Qh5 28. Qc2+?

Necessary was 28. h4 Bxh4 but Black's attack will win.

28... Kg8 29. h4










29... Qxh4!!

and mate at h1 cannot be avoided: 30.gxh4 Rxh4 etc.

0-1

Belitzmann - Akiba Rubinstein [C48]

Warsaw 1917


1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. Nc3 Nf6 4. Bb5 Nd4 5. Bc4 Bc5 6. Nxe5 Qe7 7. Nd3 d5 8. Nxd5 Qxe4+ 9. Ne3 Bd6 10. O-O b5 11. Bb3 Bb7 12. Ne1 Qh4 13. g3 Qh3 14. c3 h5 15. cxd4 h4 16. Qe2?










Necessary was 16. Nf3 hxg3 17. fxg3 Bxg3

16... Qxh2+!! 17. Kxh2 hxg3+ 18. Kg1 Rh1# 0-1


Max Euwe - Rudolf Loman [A09]

Rotterdam 1923


1. Nf3 d5 2. c4 d4 3. b4 g6 4. Bb2 Bg7 5. Na3 e5 6. Nc2 Bg4 7. e3 Ne7 8. exd4 exd4 9. h3 Bxf3 10. Qxf3 c6 11. h4 O-O 12. h5 Re8 13. O-O-O a5 14. hxg6 hxg6 15. Qh3 axb4 16. Nxd4 Bxd4?










The only move was 16... Kf8

17. Qh8+! Bxh8 18. Rxh8# 1-0


Bonch - Mikhail Osmolovsky [C43]

Moscow 1953


1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 Nf6 3. d4 exd4 4. e5 Ne4 5. Qxd4 d5 6. exd6 Nxd6 7. Bd3 Qe7+ 8. Be3 Nf5 9. Bxf5 Bxf5 10. Nc3 Qb4 11. Qe5+ Be6 12. O-O-O Nc6 13. Qxc7 Rc8 14. Qf4 Qa5 15. Qg5 Qa6 16. Rhe1 Nb4 17. Nd4 Rxc3?










18. Qd8+!! Kxd8 19. Nxe6+ Ke7

a) 19... Ke8 20. Nxg7+ Bxg7 21. Bg5+ Kf8 22. Rd8#

b) 19... Kc8 20. Rd8#

20. Bg5+ f6 21. Nd8+

and it is mate after 21...Re3 22.Rxe3+ Qe6 23.Rxe6#.

1-0

Vladimir Vukovic - Ludwig Deutsch [C65]

Zagreb 1920


1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. Bb5 Nf6 4. d4 exd4 5. e5 Ne4 6. Bf4 f5 7. Bxc6 dxc6 8. Qxd4 Qd5 9. Nc3 Qa5 10. Rd1 Be7 11. Bd2 Qb6 12. Ne2 Bc5??










13. Qd8+!! Kxd8 14. Bg5+ Ke8 15. Rd8+ Kf7 16. e6+! Kxe6

a) 16... Bxe6 17. Ne5#

b) 16... Kg6 17. Nf4#

17. Nf4+ Kf7 18. Ne5# 1-0

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Games in PGN

Michael Goeller 2007

Most of these games are referenced in Walter Korn's excellent series "The Finishing Touch" in Chess Review (July and August 1961).