Miguel Najdorf - E. Szapiro [C10]

Lodz, POL/Lodz 1928


1. e4 e6 2. d4 d5 3. Nc3 dxe4 4. Nxe4 Nd7 5. Nf3 Ngf6 6. Bd3 Be7 7. O-O b6 8. Ne5! Bb7 9. Nxf6+ gxf6

Better 9... Bxf6 10. Qe2 Nxe5 11. dxe5 Qd5 12. f4. White's sacrifice in the game probably does not force a win but it is dangerous.

 

10. Nxf7!? Kxf7 11. Qh5+ Kg8

11... Kf8? 12. Bh6+ Kg8 13. Qg4+

 

12. Re1! Nf8 13. Rxe6!! Nxe6

13... Qe8 14. Qg4+ Ng6 (14... Kf7 15. Bc4) 15. Bh6

 

14. Bc4 Qd6 15. Bh6!

15. Qg4+? Kf8 16. Bh6+ Ke8 17. Bxe6 Bf8

 

15... Bf8?










Necessary was 15... Rd8 (planning ...Bd5) 16. Qg4+ Kf7 17. Re1 (17. Bxe6+? Qxe6 18. Qg7+ Ke8 19. Qxh8+ Kd7 20. Qxh7 Rg8 loses for White, but the immediate 17. Qh5+ Kg8 18. Qg4+= also draws) 17... Bd5 18. Qh5+ Kg8 19. Qg4+ (not 19. Re3? Bxc4 20. Rg3+ Ng5) 19... Kf7= etc. and it appears White must take the draw by perpetual check. Of course, if Black had found this defense we would have been deprived of what follows...

 

16. Re1 Bc8 17. Qe8! Bd7

Now Najdorf finishes the game with a mate as perfect as Morphy's immortal opera house game.

 

 

18. Rxe6 Rxe8 19. Rxe8+ Be6 20. Bxe6+ Qxe6 21. Rxf8# 1-0

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Game in PGN

See also Mating Patters I: Bishop and Rook (available in PDF format for instruction purposes) and More Bishop and Rook Mates