NJ Knockouts Lose to New York Knights

By Michael Goeller

In Round 10 of US Chess League action, the New Jersey Knockouts fell to the New York Knights, putting an end to their season. New York will take the final playoff spot and New Jersey will have to wait until next year.

Wins by Irina Krush and Jay Bonin on Boards 2 and 3 put New York in the driver's seat early, and despite Joel Benjamin's win on Board 1 there was not much realistic hope of a tied match, though Evan Ju played until the 50 move rule to test his opponent as much as possible in a drawn position.

Despite not making the playoffs, New Jersey had a good showing for their first season in the league, which predicts good things for the future, especially considering that many of their lower boards are very young.

 

Board 1

Pascal Charbonneau-NY (2536) - Joel Benjamin-NJ (2651) [C96]

ICC 90 30 u/Internet Chess Club 2007


1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. Bb5 a6

Benjamin long ago experimented with 3... Bc5!? before switching to 3...a6 -- typically then followed by an early ...Bc5.

 

4. Ba4 Nf6 5. O-O Be7

Benjamin enjoys the White side of this position, which probably helps to prepare him to play the black side.

 

For a time, Benjamin successfully played the "Classical" 5... Bc5 6. c3 (6. Bxc6 dxc6 7. Nxe5 Nxe4 8. Qe2 Qd5 9. d4 Bxd4 10. Nf3 Be6 11. Nxd4 Qxd4 12. Rd1 Qc4 13. Qxc4 Bxc4 1/2-1/2 Sherzer,A-Benjamin,J/Philadelphia 1999 (39) -- but interesting is 6. Nxe5!?) 6... b5 7. Bc2 d6 (7... d5!? 8. d4! dxe4 9. dxc5 Qxd1 10. Bxd1 exf3 11. Bxf3 Bb7 12. a4 b4 13. Re1 O-O-O 14. Bxc6 Bxc6 15. cxb4 Nd5 16. Bd2 f6 1/2-1/2 De Firmian,N-Benjamin,J/Salt Lake City 1999 (29)) 8. a4 (why not 8. d4!?) 8... Bg4 9. d3 (9. h3 Bh5 10. b4 Bb6 11. axb5 axb5 12. Rxa8 Qxa8= 0-1 Svidler,P-Benjamin,J/Luzern 1997 (78)) 9... O-O 10. Nbd2 b4 11. h3 Bh5 12. a5 Rb8= 1-0 Adams,M-Benjamin,J/Luzern 1997 (39).

 

6. Re1 b5 7. Bb3 d6

Benjamin has also tried the Marshall Gambit with 7... O-O 8. c3 d5 9. exd5 Nxd5 10. Nxe5 Nxe5 11. Rxe5 c6 12. d4 Bd6 13. Re1 Qh4 14. g3 Qh3 15. Be3 Bg4 16. Qd3 Rae8 1/2-1/2 Gurevich,I-Benjamin,J/New York 1992 (40).

 

8. c3 O-O 9. h3

9. d4! Bg4 10. Be3!? Bd7?! (10... Nxe4?? 11. Bd5 but best 10... Re8) 11. Nbd2 Ng4 12. Nf1 Na5 13. Bc2 exd4 14. cxd4 Nxe3 15. Nxe3 c5 16. e5! g6 17. Nd5 Be6 18. Nxe7+ Qxe7 19. Qd2 Nc4 20. Qh6! dxe5 21. dxe5 f5 (eventually forced -- not 21... Nxb2 22. Ng5) 22. exf6 Rxf6 23. Ng5 Re8 24. Re2 Nd6 25. Rae1 Qd7 26. h4 Bxa2 27. Nxh7 Rfe6 28. Bxg6 1-0 Gurevich,I-Benjamin,J/Durango 1992.

 

9... Na5 10. Bc2 d5!?

A very interesting gambit, reminiscent of the Marshall but less well studied.

 

 

11. d4!?

This is definitely the safest move for White. Accepting the gambit leads to some crazy complications, which surely Benjamin knows better:

11. exd5 e4! 12. Ng5 (12. Nd4 Qxd5 13. f3 Bxh3! 14. fxe4 (14. gxh3 c5 15. Nb3 Qg5+ 16. Kf1 Qg3 17. Bxe4 (17. Nxa5? exf3) 17... Qxh3+ 18. Kg1 Qg3+ 19. Kf1 Qh3+=) 14... Qg5 15. Qf3 Bg4 16. d3 Qh4 0-1 Krejci,J-Votava,J/Ceska Trebova 2007 (35)) (12. Ne5 Qxd5 13. d4 exd3 14. Qxd3 Bb7 15. Qxd5 Bxd5 16. Bg5 Rfe8= Nemcova,K-Manik,M/Ceska Trebova 2007 (58)) (12. Bxe4 Nxe4 13. Rxe4 Bb7 14. d4 Re8 15. Bf4 Nc4 16. b3 Nb6 17. c4 bxc4 18. bxc4 Nxc4 19. Nc3 Nd6 20. Re1 Nb5 21. Rc1 Rc8 22. Qa4 Bd6 23. Rxe8+ Qxe8 24. Re1 Qd7 25. Ne5 Bxe5 26. dxe5 Rd8 27. Qb3 Bxd5 28. Nxd5 Qxd5 29. Qxd5 Rxd5= 0-1 Kaplan,S-Ragger,M/Yerevan 2007 (50)) 12... Nxd5 13. Nxe4 f5 14. Ng3 (14. b4 fxe4 15. bxa5 Bc5 16. Rxe4 Bxf2+ 17. Kh1 Bf5 18. Ba3 c5 19. Re5 Bxc2 20. Qxc2 Bg3 21. Rf5 Qg5 22. Rxf8+ Rxf8 23. Qd1 Qh5 0-1 Jameson,D-Rudd,J/Liverpool 2007) 14... f4 15. Ne4 f3 16. d4 fxg2 17. Ng3 (17. Qh5 g6 18. Qh6 Rf5 19. Ng3 Bf8 20. Qd2 Rf7 21. Qd3 (21. b3 Nf4 22. Ne4 Nxh3+ 23. Kxg2 Qd7 24. Qe3 Bb7 25. f3 Nf4+ 26. Kg1 Qh3 27. Qf2 Qh5 28. Bxf4 Rxf4 29. Nbd2 Bg7 30. Qg3 Raf8 31. Kg2 Qd5 32. Ng5 b4 33. Ne6 Rxf3 34. Nxf3 Rxf3 35. Qh4 Rg3+ 36. Kxg3 Qf3+ 0-1 Gouliev,N-Fressinet,L/Ajaccio 2007) 21... Bxh3 22. Ne4 Bf5 23. Qg3 Be7 24. Bh6 Bh4 25. Qxg2 Nc4 26. b3 Bxe4 27. Rxe4 Bxf2+ 28. Kh1 Nce3 29. Bxe3 Nxe3 30. Rxe3 Bxe3 0-1 Weeks,M-Mannion,S/Port Erin 2007) 17... Qd6 18. Be4 Bb7 19. Nf5 Rxf5 20. Bxf5 Rf8 21. Re6 Rxf5 22. Rxd6 Bxd6 23. a4?! Bg3 24. f3 Bf4 25. axb5 Bxc1 26. Rxa5? (26. Qxc1 Rxf3 27. bxa6 Bc6 28. Qg5 Rf1+ 29. Kxg2 Ne3+ 30. Kh2 Rf2+ 31. Kg1 Rf1+=) 26... Nf4 27. Qe1 Bxf3 28. bxa6 Nxh3+ 29. Kh2 Bf4+ 30. Kxh3 g1=N+ 31. Qxg1 Rxa5 0-1 Kuznetsov,V-Gajewski,G/Pardubice 2007.

 

11... dxe4!?

11... Nxe4 12. Nxe5 f6 13. Nf3 Nc4 14. Nbd2 Ncxd2 15. Bxd2 Bb7 16. Bf4 Bd6 17. Bxd6 Qxd6 18. Nd2 Rae8 19. Nb3 Qf4 20. Re2 Bc8 21. Qe1 Nd6 22. Nc5 Rxe2 23. Qxe2 Re8 24. Qh5 f5 25. Qd1 Qg5 26. a4 f4 27. Qf3 c6 28. axb5 axb5 29. Kf1 Nf5 30. Bxf5 Qxf5 31. Nd3 Re4 32. Ne5 c5 33. Qd1 b4 34. Ra8 bxc3 35. bxc3 cxd4 36. cxd4 f3 37. Nxf3 Re8 38. Kg1 1-0 Smirin,I-Greenfeld,A/Beer Sheva 2007.

 

12. Nxe5 Bb7 13. Bg5 c5 14. Nd2 cxd4 15. cxd4 Re8!

15... Qxd4 16. Nxe4 Qxd1 17. Raxd1

 

16. Bxf6

16. Nxe4!? Nxe4 17. Bxe7 Qxe7 18. Bxe4 Bxe4 19. Rxe4 f6 20. b4! Qxb4 21. Nd3

 

16... Bxf6 17. Nxe4 Bxe5 18. dxe5 Rxe5=

Black has achieved easy equality, and now White makes the classic mistake of trying to make a claim for the advantage where none exists.

 

19. b4!? Nc6 20. Nc5!?

A nice square for the Knight, which gives White sufficient compensation to regain his pawn. But Black is able to return it under favorable circumstances and gain the edge. Probably the most prudent course was 20. Qxd8+ Rxd8 21. Red1! Nd4! (21... Rxd1+?! 22. Rxd1 g6 23. a3) 22. Nc5 Bc6=

 

20... Qxd1 21. Raxd1 Rxe1+ 22. Rxe1 Nxb4 23. Bb3 Bc6

Probably better than 23... Bd5!? 24. Nxa6! (24. a3 Bxb3 25. axb4 Bc4 26. Nxa6 h5) 24... Bxb3 (24... Nxa6 25. Bxd5) 25. Nc7! Rd8 (25... Nc2!? 26. Rd1 Rc8 27. axb3 b4) 26. axb3 Nc2 27. Re5 Nd4=

 

24. Rd1

24. a3 Nd5 25. Bxd5 Bxd5 26. Nxa6 Bc4

 

24... a5!

This forces things to a clarified ending of Bishop versus Knight, which seems to favor Black slightly. Also possible was 24... Be8!?

 

25. a3 a4 26. axb4 axb3 27. Nxb3 Kf8=

Though Bishops can be better than Knights with pawns on both sides of the board, the Knight fares well when the pawns are locked as they are here. White tries to turn his superior minor piece to account, but he really ought to simply agree a draw here.

 

28. Rc1

28. Nc5 Ra2 29. Rd6 Be8 30. Rd4=

 

28... Be8 29. Nd4 Ra4 30. Rc8?

White has calculated that he regains his temporary pawn sacrifice, but the resulting position favors Black strongly.

30. Rb1=

 

 

30... Rxb4 31. Nf5 Rc4 32. Rb8 Rc6 33. Nxg7 Kxg7 34. Rxe8 Rb6

With Black's Rook strongly situated behind his passed pawn, the ending looks very favorable for him.

 

35. f4?! b4 36. Kf2 b3 37. Re1 b2 38. Rb1 Rb3 39. Ke1 Kg6 40. Kd1 Kf5 41. Kc2 Rb7 42. g3 Ke4

White cannot exchange Rooks or he will lose the K+P ending, but he is lost in any event. Great technique from Benjamin carries Black to the full point.

 

43. Re1+ Kf3 44. Kb1 Kxg3 45. f5 h5

45... Kxh3 46. f6 Rb6 47. Rh1+ Kg4 48. Rxh7 Rb7! should also win: 49. Rh1 Kf5 50. Rf1+ Ke5 51. Rf2 Rb6 as in the game.

 

46. f6 Rb6 47. Re3+ Kf4 48. Rc3 Kg5 49. Rc5+ Kh4

In time pressure, Benjamin tries to be careful to keep the win intact. Perhaps 49... Kg6! 50. h4 Rxf6 51. Kxb2 Rf4 looks easier, though the Rook ending with h- and f-pawns can be tough to play correctly.

 

50. Rf5 Rb3 51. Re5 Rb6 52. Rf5 Kxh3 53. Rxh5+ Kg4 54. Rh7 Rb7 55. Rh2 Kf5 56. Rf2+ Ke5 57. Rf1 Rb5 58. Rf2 Rb6 59. Rf1 Rb4 60. Rf2 Rb5 61. Rf1 Rb6 62. Rf2 Rxf6! 63. Re2+ Kd4! 64. Kxb2 Kd3 65. Re7 Rf2+ 66. Kb3 f5 67. Rd7+ Ke3 68. Kc3 f4 69. Re7+ Kf3 70. Kd3 Ra2 71. Rf7 Ra8 72. Kd2 Re8 73. Rf6 Kg3 74. Rf7 f3 75. Rg7+ Kf2 76. Rf7 Rd8+ 77. Kc2 Kg2 78. Rg7+ Kf1 79. Rf7 f2 80. Rf6 Rg8!

White resigns, as there is no way to stop Black from Queening after 81.Kd2 Kg2 82.Ke2 Re8+ etc. Also effective -- if slower -- is the classic "bridge" maneuver with 80... Rd5 81. Rg6 Ke2 82. Re6+ Kf3 83. Rf6+ Ke3 84. Re6+ (84. Rf8 Rd4) 84... Kf4 85. Rf6+ Rf5

0-1


Board 2

Mikhail Zlotnikov-NJ (2408) - Irina Krush-NY (2512) [A20]

ICC 90 30 u/Internet Chess Club 2007


1. c4 e5 2. g3 c6 3. d4 Bb4+ 4. Bd2 Bxd2+ 5. Qxd2 d6 6. Nc3 Nf6










7. dxe5?!

Though this seems an easy route to equality, the ending that follows is actually somewhat easier for Black, due mainly to the potential weakness of the pawn at c4 and White's weakness on dark squares -- accentuated here by the exchange of Bishops.

7. Bg2 O-O 8. e4 Nbd7 yields a position with chances for both sides, as two games help to illustrate: 9. Nge2!? (9. Nf3 Qe7 10. O-O a6 11. Rac1 b5 12. cxb5 axb5 13. a3 Nb6 14. h3 Bb7 15. Qe2 Ba6 16. b4 Bb7 17. Ra1 Ra6 18. Ra2 Rfa8 19. Rfa1 Nfd7 20. d5 cxd5 21. Nxb5 Rc8 22. exd5 Bxd5 23. Nxd6 Rca8 24. Nf5 Qe6 25. N3h4 Bxa2 26. Bxa8 Rxa8 27. Rxa2 g6 28. Ne3 Qxh3 29. Ng4 h5 30. Ne3 Qe6 31. Ra1 e4 32. Nhg2 Ne5 33. Nf4 Qf6 34. Ra2 Nf3+ 35. Kg2 Qg5 36. Nc4 Nxc4 37. Qxc4 Re8 38. Re2 Qg4 39. Qc6 Rc8 40. Qxe4 Nh4+ 41. Kh1 Rc1+ 42. Re1 Qf3+ 43. Kg1 Qxe4 44. Rxc1 g5 45. gxh4 Qxf4 46. Rc3 Qxh4 47. b5 Qg4+ 48. Rg3 Qd1+ 49. Kh2 g4 0-1 Stajcic,N-Leko,P/Kecskemet 1991) 9... a6 10. O-O b5 11. cxb5 axb5 12. a3 Nb6 13. b3! Qe7 14. h3 Bb7 15. Qe3 Nbd7 16. Rfd1 Rfd8 17. d5 Ra6 18. dxc6 Bxc6 19. Nd5 Bxd5 20. exd5 Qe8 21. Nc3 Nc5 22. Bf1 Rb8 23. a4 Nxb3 24. Rab1 Nd4 25. Bxb5 Nxb5 26. axb5 Rab6 27. Ra1 Nd7 28. Ra7 Qd8 29. Qf3 R6b7 30. Rxb7 Rxb7 31. Ne4 Qc7 32. Qc3 Qxc3 33. Nxc3 Kf8 34. Ra1 Ke7 35. Ra6 h5 36. Kf1 f5 37. h4 g6 38. Ke2 Nc5 39. Rc6 Nb3 40. Kd3 Kd7 41. Kc4 Nd4 42. f4 Rb8 43. fxe5 dxe5 44. Kc5 Nb3+ 45. Kb4 Nc1 46. b6 e4 47. Nb5 Nd3+ 48. Kc3 f4 49. Rxg6 f3 50. Rg7+ Kd8 51. Rg8+ 1-0 Kortchnoi,V-Bacrot,E/Albert 1997.

 

7... dxe5 8. Qxd8+ Kxd8 9. Nf3 Re8 10. Bg2 Kc7 11. O-O a5!

Laying claim to dark squares, and making it difficult for White to support a possible c5 advance, trying to seize the only potential weakness in Black's position -- the d6 square. Meanwhile, the Black Knight will find a nice square at c5.

 

12. Rfd1 Nbd7 13. Rd2 Nc5 14. Ng5 Be6 15. Nxe6+ Rxe6

The Knight is better than White's Bishop in this position.

 

16. Rad1 Re7 17. Bh3 Rae8 18. f3 h5 19. Bf5 e4!

Trying to damage White's pawn structure or gain space.

 

20. f4 Ng4!

The threat of ...Ne3 practically forces the exchange at g4, which favors Black.

 

21. Bxg4 hxg4 22. f5!?

An interesting bid to artificially isolate Black's advanced pawns, but this pawn ends up becoming a weakness.

 

22... Re5 23. Rf1 Nd7 24. Nd1 e3!

White is being choked for space.

 

25. Rd4 Nf6 26. Kg2 Re4 27. Rxe4 Rxe4 28. Rf4 Re5 29. h3 gxh3+ 30. Kxh3 Kd6 31. Kg2 Kc5 32. g4

32. Rf3 Kxc4 33. Rxe3 Kd4 and the pawn at f5 is in trouble.

 

32... Ne4! 33. Nxe3?










More resistance was possible by 33. Rf3 Nd2 34. Rxe3 Rxe3 35. Nxe3 Kd4 36. Nd1 Nxc4 37. Kf3 a4

 

33... Ng5 34. Nf1

a) 34. Kf2? Nh3+

b) 34. Nd1 Rxe2+ 35. Kg3 Rd2

 

34... Rxe2+ 35. Rf2 Re4 36. Kg3 Rxc4 37. Re2 Re4 38. Rxe4?! Nxe4+ 39. Kf4 Kd4 40. Nh2 b5 41. Nf3+ Kd5 42. Ne5 Nd6 43. g5 c5 44. g6 fxg6 45. Nxg6 c4 46. Ne7+ Kc5 47. Ng8 b4 48. f6 gxf6 49. Nxf6 Kd4 50. Ng4 c3 51. bxc3+ bxc3

White resigns. A great performance by Krush, and more evidence that these types of positions tend to favor Black.

0-1

Board 3

Jay Bonin-NY (2360) - Mackenzie Molner-NJ (2335) [A43]

ICC 90 30 u/Internet Chess Club 2007


1. d4 Nf6 2. Nf3 c5 3. d5 b5

Molner, who frequently plays the Benko Gambit, would have been prepared for Bonin's well-known anti-Benko approach, which he used in two games last year in USCL action. In both of last year's games, Black did well.

 

4. Bg5 Ne4

Black has tried a wide range of moves here, including 4... Bb7, 4... Qa5+ and 4... Qb6 , but the text seems most popular currently.

 

5. Qd3!?

Bonin's favorite move, which forces Black to play a gambit. 5. Bf4 e6 is also frequently seen.

 

 

5... Nxg5

5... Qa5+ 6. Nbd2 (6. c3 Nxg5 7. Nxg5 g6 8. Qf3 f6 9. Ne6 Na6 10. Nxf8 Rxf8 11. e4 Bb7 12. a4 c4 13. Qe3 f5 14. Nd2 fxe4 15. Nxe4 Bxd5 16. Nd6+ Kd8 1/2-1/2 Barsov,A-Kogan,A/Utrecht 1999 (31)) 6... f5!? 7. c3 c4 8. Qc2 Na6 9. Nxe4 fxe4 10. Qxe4 Bb7 11. Qd4 h6 12. Bd2 O-O-O 13. b4!? cxb3 14. c4 Qb6 15. axb3 e6 16. Qxb6 axb6 17. Ne5 Nc5 18. Nf7 Re8 19. Nxh8 exd5 20. e3 Nxb3 21. Rb1 dxc4 22. Rxb3 cxb3 23. Bd3 Ba3 24. Ng6 Bxg2 25. Rg1 Be4 26. Ke2 Bxd3+ 27. Kxd3 Re6 28. Kc3?! b2! 29. Kc2 b4 30. Nf4 Rc6+ 31. Kb1 Rd6 32. Rd1 b3 33. Ne2 Rd3 34. Nc3? Bb4! 35. Ne4 d5 36. Rg1 Bxd2 37. Nxd2 Rxd2 38. f4 d4 39. exd4 Rxd4 40. Rxg7 Rxf4 41. Kxb2 Rf2+ 42. Kxb3 Rxh2 43. Kb4 Rb2+ 44. Kc4 b5+ 45. Kc5 Kd8 46. Rh7 Rh2 47. Kxb5 Ke8 48. Kc5 Kf8 49. Kd5 Kg8 50. Ra7 Re2 51. Kd4 Rg2 52. Ke3 h5 53. Ra5 h4 54. Rh5 Rg4 55. Kf3 Ra4 1/2-1/2 Bonin,J - Kaufman,R New York vs Baltimore USCL 2006.

 

6. Nxg5 g6!?

A move made popular by Topalov. Last year, Bonin faced a different move in this position:

6... e6 (6...h6 and 6...Qb6 are also played) 7. h4 c4 (7... Qf6!? 8. Nc3 c4 9. Qd2 Bb4 10. Rh3 O-O 11. a4 Bb7 12. e4 h6 13. Nf3 exd5 14. exd5 Re8+ 15. Be2 Na6 16. axb5 Nc5 17. Kf1 a6 18. bxa6 Rxa6 19. Rb1 Rb6 20. Ra1 Ne4 21. Nxe4 Rxe4 22. c3 Bc5 23. Ra5 d6 24. Ra4 Ra6 25. Rxa6 Bxa6 26. Qc2 Qf4 27. h5 Bc8 28. Rh4 Bg4 29. Bd1 Re7 30. g3 Qf5 31. Ng1 Be2+ 32. Kg2 Qxf2+ 33. Kh3 Qf1+ 0-1 Arkell,K-Steinbacher,M/Copenhagen 1994) 8. Qf3 Qf6 9. Nc3 Qxf3 (9... Bb4 10. O-O-O Qxf3 11. gxf3 h6 12. Nge4 f5 13. a3 Be7 14. Ng3 a6 15. f4 Bf6 16. Bg2 Ra7 17. e4 Bxc3 18. bxc3 fxe4 19. Nxe4 O-O 20. Nd6 Rc7 21. f5 g6 22. fxg6 a5 23. f4 b4 24. f5 Na6 25. Rdf1 exf5 26. Bh3 bxa3 27. Rhg1 a2 28. Kb2 Bb7 29. g7 Rb8 30. Kxa2 Bxd5 31. Nxf5 d6 32. Nxh6+ Kh7 33. Ng4 Nb4+ 34. cxb4 c3+ 35. Ka1 Rxb4 36. Nf6+ Kh6 37. g8=N+ Bxg8 38. Nxg8+ Kh5 39. Nf6+ Kxh4 40. Rg4+ Rxg4 41. Bxg4 1-0 Karner,H-Katalymov,B/Moscow 1972) (9... Bb7 10. O-O-O Qxf3 11. Nxf3 a6 12. e3 Bb4 13. dxe6 dxe6 14. a4 Nd7 15. Na2 Be7 16. Nd4 Nb6 17. a5 Nd5 18. Be2 Nb4 19. Nxb4 Bxb4 20. Bf3 Bxf3 21. Nxf3 Bxa5 22. Ne5 Rc8 23. Rd6 Bc7 24. Rc6 Ke7 25. Nf3 Bd6 26. Rxa6 Ra8 27. Rxa8 Rxa8 28. Kb1 Bc5 29. Rd1 f6 30. Nd4 Bxd4 31. Rxd4 Ra6 Marantz,M-Pasman,M/Israel 1984) 10. exf3 h6 11. Nge4 f5 12. Nd2 a6 13. g3 Bb7 14. Bg2 e5 15. Bh3 Bb4 16. Bxf5 Bxc3 17. bxc3 Bxd5 18. Be4 Bxe4 19. fxe4 Nc6 20. a4 Ke7 21. Ke2 Raf8 22. axb5 axb5 23. Rhb1 b4 24. Nxc4 bxc3 25. Ra3 Nd4+ 26. Kf1 Rf6 27. Ne3 Rc6 28. Rxc3 Rxc3 29. Nd5+ Ke6 30. Nxc3 Rc8 31. Rb6+ Kf7 32. Nb5 Nxb5 33. Rxb5 Ke6 34. Rb2 Rc4 35. f3 Rc3 36. Kf2 h5 37. f4 Rc4 38. Rb6+ d6 39. f5+ Ke7 40. Rb7+ Kf6 41. Rd7 Rxc2+ 42. Kf3 Rc3+ 43. Kg2 Rd3 44. Kf2 g6 45. fxg6 Kxg6 46. Ke2 Rxg3 47. Rxd6+ Kf7 48. Rh6 Rg4 49. Rxh5 Rxe4+ 50. Kf3 Rf4+ 51. Kg3 1/2-1/2 Bonin,B - Zaikov,O New York vs Carolina USCL 2006.

 

7. Qxb5!?

Only Bonin seems willing to snatch this pawn!

a) 7. h4 Bg7 8. c3 h6 9. Nf3 c4 10. Qd2 Bb7 11. Na3 Qb6 12. e4 Na6 13. Nd4 Nc7 14. h5 g5 15. Nac2 e6 16. a4 exd5 17. axb5 O-O 1-0 Hebden,M-Gormally,D/Scarborough ENG 2004 (54).

 

b) 7. e4 Bg7 8. c3 O-O!? 9. Be2 e6! 10. Nf3 exd5 11. Qxd5 Qb6 12. Nbd2 Bb7 13. Qb3 c4 14. Qd1 d6 15. a4 a6 16. axb5 axb5 17. Rxa8 Bxa8 18. O-O Nd7 19. Re1 Nc5 20. Bf1 Re8 21. Qc2 h6 22. g3 Bb7 23. Qb1 h5 24. h4 Qc6 25. Bg2 Nd3 26. Rf1 d5 27. b3 Qc5 28. exd5 Bxd5 29. bxc4 bxc4 30. Ng5 Bxg2 31. Kxg2 Qd5+ 32. Ngf3 Bxc3 33. Qc2 Bxd2 34. Qxd2 Re5 35. Ra1 Rf5 36. Qe3 Ne5 0-1 Golod,V-Topalov,V/Bugojno 1999.

 

7... Bg7 8. Nd2!?

Bonin makes an interesting improvement over a prior game of his, deliberately sacrificing back the b-pawn:

a) 8. Nc3?! Na6! 9. e3? Rb8! 10. Qa4 Rxb2 11. Qa3? Rxc2 12. Nge4 Nb4 13. Rc1 f5 14. Bc4 Rxc1+ 15. Qxc1 fxe4 16. Nxe4 d6 17. O-O O-O 18. f4 Qa5 19. a3 Na6 20. Ng5 Qc3 21. g3 Nc7 22. e4 h6 23. Nf3 Ba6 24. Bxa6 Qxc1 25. Rxc1 Nxa6 26. Rc4 Nc7 0-1 Bonin,J-Smith,B/Stillwater 2007.

 

b) 8. c3!? retains the b-pawn and seems playable: 8... Na6 9. e4 Rb8 10. Qe2 O-O

 

8... Na6 9. c3 Rb8 10. Qd3 Rxb2 11. Nc4 Rb8 12. e4 d6 13. Be2 O-O

Black seems to be doing fine here with his two Bishops and control of the b-file.

 

14. O-O Nc7

14... e5 15. Nf3 f5 might be an idea, treating the position more like a King's Indian.

 

15. Rab1 Rxb1 16. Rxb1 e6 17. Qg3 h6?










Bonin's next labels this a blunder, though it is clear in retrospect that Black is coming under strong pressure.

a) 17... e5?! 18. Rb8!

 

b) 17... Ba6! 18. Bf1 h6 may have been the best.

18. Nxf7!! Rxf7 19. Nxd6 Rf8 20. Rb8 Qd7 21. Nxc8 Rxc8 22. Rb7 exd5?

This loses, though Black is in serious trouble after any move:

a) 22... Qa4 23. d6

 

b) 22... h5 23. d6

23. Bg4! Qa4 24. h3 Qxe4 25. Bxc8 d4 26. cxd4 cxd4 27. Rxc7 Qe1+ 28. Kh2 Be5 29. Be6+

Black resigns. A very strong performance by Bonin.

1-0

Board 4

Evan Ju-NJ (2303) - Irina Zenyuk-NY (2185) [B49]

ICC 90 30 u/Internet Chess Club 2007


1. e4 c5 2. Nf3 e6 3. d4 cxd4 4. Nxd4 Nc6 5. Nc3 Qc7 6. Be2 a6 7. O-O Nf6 8. Be3 Bb4 9. Na4 Be7 10. Nxc6 bxc6 11. Nb6 Rb8 12. Nxc8 Qxc8

This is a very well-known position, which has been reached at the highest levels many times.

 

13. Bd4 c5

Taking the e-pawn leaves Black's King trapped in the center: 13... Nxe4?! 14. Bxg7 Rg8 15. Be5 d6 16. Qd3 f5 17. Bh5+ Kf8 (17... Kd7 18. Rad1 Rb5 19. Bf4 Qb8 20. b3 Bg5 21. Bxg5 Nxg5 22. c4 Rb4 23. f4 Ne4 24. Bf3 Nc5 25. Qd4 Nb7 26. Rfe1 Qd8 27. Re3 Qb6 28. Qd3 Qa5 29. Qe2 Re8 30. Kh1 Rb6 31. Qc2 Re7 32. Qe2 Qb4 33. Re1 Nc5 34. g4 fxg4 35. Bxg4 Rb8 36. f5 Rf8 37. fxe6+ Kc7 38. Rd1 Rf4 39. Bh3 a5 40. Qg2 Qb8 41. Rxd6 Qe8 42. Qg3 1-0 Rytshagov,M-Miladinovic,I/Istanbul TUR 2000) 18. Bf4 Kg7 19. Bf3 e5 20. Bxe4 fxe4 21. Qxe4 Rxb2 22. Bg3!? Bf6 23. c4 Rd8 24. Rad1 Qd7 25. Bh4 Bxh4 26. Qxh4 Rf8 27. Qg5+ Kh8 28. Qxe5+ dxe5 29. Rxd7 Rxa2 30. h3 Rc2 31. Rc7 Rxc4 32. Rb1 a5 33. Rbb7 Rh4 34. Ra7 Rh6 35. Rxa5 Re8 36. Raa7 Kg8 37. Kf1 e4 38. Rg7+ Kh8 39. Rge7 Rc8 40. Rxe4 c5 41. Ree7 c4 42. Rac7 Rc6 43. Rxh7+ Kg8 44. Rxc8+ 1-0 Nisipeanu,L-Saldano,H/St Vincent ITA 2004.

 

14. Be5 Rb6 15. b3!?

As White typically plays this move eventually anyway, and the Bishop finds the best home at b2, this is definitely a bid at improvement over the more standard 15.Qd3:

15. Qd3 d6 16. Bc3 O-O 17. b3 Nd7 (17... d5?! 18. e5! (Kasparov has also tried 18. exd5!? playing for a safe but slight edge: 18... Nxd5 19. Bd2 Nb4 20. Qc4 Rd6 21. Bxb4 cxb4 22. Qxb4 Qxc2 23. Bxa6 Rxa6 24. Qxe7 Rxa2 25. Rxa2 Qxa2 26. b4 h6 27. h3 Qb3 28. Rc1 Rb8 29. Rc7 Qb1+ 30. Kh2 Qf5 31. Qd6 Ra8 32. Qc5 Qxc5 33. bxc5 Ra2 1/2-1/2 Kasparov,G-Anand,V/Frankfurt GER 2000) 18... Nd7 19. f4 f5 20. exf6 Bxf6 21. Bxf6 Nxf6 22. Bf3 Kh8 23. Rae1 a5 24. Re2 Rd8 25. Rfe1 a4 26. bxa4 Qa6 27. Qxa6 Rxa6 28. Rxe6 Rxa4 29. Rc6 c4 30. g4 Ra3 31. Kg2 Rxa2 32. Re2 Ra4 33. g5 Ng8 34. Rce6 Ra7 35. Re8 Rad7 36. Bg4 Rd6 37. R2e7 1-0 Kasparov,G-Lautier,J/Cannes FRA 2001) 18. Rad1 Bf6 19. Ba5 Rc6 20. Qg3 Ne5 21. Bc3 Qd8 22. f4 Ng6 23. e5 Be7 24. Bf3 Rc8 25. exd6 Bh4 26. Qh3 Nxf4 27. Qg4 Ng6 28. Bb7 Rb8 29. Bxa6 Ra8 30. Qe2 Qb6 31. Bc4 Rxa2 32. Bxe6 c4+ 33. Kh1 cxb3 34. Bxf7+ Rxf7 35. Qe8+ Rf8 36. Qe6+ 1-0 Abu Sufian,S-Rahman,Z/Dhaka BAN 2007.

 

15... d6

15... Nxe4 16. Bxg7 Rg8 17. Be5 Bd6 18. Bg3 Nxg3 19. fxg3! Ke7 20. Qd3 Qf8 21. Qxh7 Qg7 22. Qh5 f5 23. Qh4+ Qg5 24. Rad1 a5 25. Rf3 Qxh4 26. gxh4 Be5 27. h5 d5 28. Rh3 Kd6 29. Kf1 Rb7 30. Bf3 Ra7 31. Rh4 Bf6 32. Ra4 d4 33. a3 Rgg7 34. Rc4 Rac7 35. Be2 e5 36. Ra4 Ra7 37. Rd3 e4 38. Rh3 Ke5 39. h6 Rg8 40. Bc4 Rf8 41. Rh5 Be7 42. g4 Kf4 43. h7 Raa8 44. Rxa5 Rxa5 45. Rxf5+ Rxf5 46. h8=Q Rf6 47. g5 Rf8 48. Qh4+ Ke3+ 49. Kg2 Kd2 50. Qxe4 Ra7 51. h4 Bd6 52. Qe6 Rd8 53. g6 Kxc2 54. Qe2+ Kc3 55. Bd3 Kxb3 56. Qc2+ Kxa3 57. Bc4 Rb8 58. Qa2+ Kb4 59. Qxa7 Kxc4 60. Qxb8 Bxb8 61. g7 1-0 Shabalov,A-Macieja,B/Paget Parish BER 2001.

 

16. Bb2 O-O 17. Qd3 Nd7










a) 17... d5 18. exd5 Nxd5 19. Rad1 Bf6 20. Bxf6 Nxf6 21. Bf3 h6 22. Rd2 Qc7 23. Rfd1 a5 24. g3 a4 25. Qc3 axb3 26. cxb3 Qe7 27. Qe5 Ra6 28. Be2 Ra3 29. Bc4 Qa7 30. Rd8 Qe7 31. Rxf8+ Qxf8 32. Qc7 Ra8 33. a4 Rb8 34. a5 g6 35. a6 1-0 Polgar,J-Camacho Calle,P/Calatrava 2007.

 

b) 17... a5 18. a4 Qc6 19. e5 Nd5 20. Qg3 dxe5 21. Bb5 Qb7 22. Bxe5 f6 23. Bb2 Bd6 24. Qf3 Nb4 25. Qe2 Bb8 26. Rad1 Nd5 27. g3 Bc7 28. c4 Nb4 29. Rd7 Qc8 30. Rfd1 e5 31. Qg4 Rf7 32. Qh5 Rf8 33. Qg4 Rf7 34. Qh5 Rf8 35. Bc3 Re6 36. Bxb4 axb4 37. Rxg7+ Kxg7 38. Bd7 Qe8 39. Bxe8 Rfxe8 40. Rd5 Bb6 41. Rd7+ R8e7 42. Qe8 Rxd7 43. Qxd7+ Kg6 44. Qxe6 Bc7 1-0 Lahno,K-Mongontuul,B/Sochi RUS 2006.

 

18. Qg3

Best seems to keep the dark squared Bishops on the board by 18. Rad1! Bf6 19. Bc1! (19. Bxf6 Nxf6 20. Rd2 Qc6 21. Bf3 Nd7 22. Rfd1 1-0 Areshchenko,A-Melkumyan,H/Yerevan 2004 (54)) 19... Ne5 (19... Rc6 20. Qg3 Ne5 21. f4 Ng6 22. Bc4 Kh8 23. Qh3 Rb6 24. Qh5 Rd8 25. Rd3 Qb7 26. e5 dxe5 27. fxe5 Rxd3 28. Bxd3 Qd5 29. Bxg6 fxg6 30. exf6 1-0 Nataf,I-Haapasalo,J/Stockholm SWE 2004) 20. Qg3 Qb8 21. f4 Nc6 22. c3 Rc8 23. f5 exf5 24. Rxf5 Be5 25. Qf3 Nd8 26. Bc4 g6 27. Bxf7+ Kg7 28. Rxe5 dxe5 29. Bc4 Rc7 30. Rf1 Nb7 31. Bg5 h6 32. Bf6+ Kh7 33. Bxe5 Nd6 34. Qf8 Qxf8 35. Rxf8 Rg7 36. Bd5 Nxe4 37. Bxg7 1-0 Lahno,K-Mongontuul,B/Turin ITA 2006.

 

18... Bf6 19. Bxf6 Nxf6 20. e5 dxe5 21. Qxe5 Rd8 22. Rad1 Rd5!

White may have slightly the better structure, but Black's pieces are very active.

 

23. Qc3 Rbd6 24. Qa5 h6 25. Bf3 Rd4 26. c3 Rxd1 27. Rxd1 Rxd1+ 28. Bxd1 Qd7 29. Be2

29. Bf3! Qd2 30. Qxa6 Qxc3 31. h3

 

29... Qd2 30. Qxa6 Qe1+ 31. Bf1 Ne4! 32. a4 Qxf2+ 33. Kh1 Qe3 34. g3 Nf2+ 35. Kg2 Ng4 36. Qe2 Qg5 37. Qe4 Qd2+ 38. Qe2 Qg5

38... Ne3+! 39. Kg1 Qxc3

 

39. Qe4 Qd2+ 40. Be2! Ne3+ 41. Kf3 Nd5 42. Qd3 Qe1 43. Kg2 Nxc3 44. Bf3 Qa1=










Black is up a pawn, but White's outside passed pawn creates theoretically stronger winning chances should Black misplay the defense. Basically, it's pretty much a draw and probably impossible for either side to make progress without allowing perpetual check. This was the last game and only a win would help NJ, so Ju felt compelled to play on until the 50-move rule thankfully ended the struggle.

 

45. Qd8+ Kh7 46. a5 Qa2+ 47. Kh3 Qxb3 48. Qd3+ f5 49. a6 c4 50. Qd7 Nb5 51. Bc6 c3 52. Bxb5 c2 53. Ba4 Qxa4 54. Qxa4 c1=Q 55. Qb5 g5 56. Qd7+ Kh8 57. Qe8+ Kh7 58. Qf7+ Kh8 59. Qf6+ Kh7 60. Qe7+ Kh8 61. Qd8+ Kh7 62. Qd7+ Kh8 63. Qd4+ Kh7 64. Qd3 g4+ 65. Kg2 Qc6+ 66. Kg1 Qc5+ 67. Kf1 Qc1+ 68. Ke2 Qb2+ 69. Kd1 Qa1+ 70. Kc2 Qa2+ 71. Kc3 Qa3+ 72. Kd4 Qd6+ 73. Ke3 Qe5+ 74. Kd2 Qa5+ 75. Kc1 Qa1+ 76. Kc2 Qa2+ 77. Kc3 Qa3+ 78. Kd2 Qb2+ 79. Qc2 Qb4+ 80. Qc3 Qd6+ 81. Qd3 Qb4+ 82. Kc2 Qa4+ 83. Kb2 Qb4+ 84. Kc1 Qc5+ 85. Kd2 Qa5+ 86. Ke3 Qe5+ 87. Kf2 Qc5+ 88. Qe3 Qc2+ 89. Qe2 Qc5+ 90. Ke1 Qc3+ 91. Kd1 Qa1+ 92. Kd2 Qb2+ 93. Ke1 Qc3+ 94. Kf1 Qc1+ 95. Kf2 Qc5+ 96. Qe3 Qc2+ 97. Qe2 Qc5+ 98. Ke1 Qc3+ 99. Kd1 Qa1+ 100. Kd2 Qb2+ 101. Kd3 Qb5+ 102. Ke3 Qe5+ 103. Kf2 Qc5+ 104. Qe3 Qc2+ 105. Kf1 Qc4+ 106. Qe2 Qc1+ 107. Kg2 Qc6+ 108. Kg1 Qc5+ 109. Qf2 Qc1+ 110. Qf1 Qc5+ 111. Kg2 Qc6+ 112. Kf2 Qc5+ 113. Ke1 Qc1+ 114. Ke2 Qc4+ 115. Kf2 Qc5+ 116. Kg2 Qc6+ 117. Kg1 Qc5+

Game drawn by the 50 move rule

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Annotations Copyright © 2007 by Michael Goeller