NJ Knockouts vs. Queens Pioneers

US Chess League 2008, Round 7

By Michael Goeller

The New Jersey Knockouts had an opportunity to overtake the Queens Pioneers on Monday night, October 6, 2008, in Round 7 of US Chess League action but ended up with only a 2-2 tie, despite having a significant advantage in the two drawn games. If New Jersey had won, they would have tied Queens for lead in the Eastern Division. Let's hope that the 2-2 tieNew Jersey will meet Queens again in the playoffs and finally carry home the full point.

Board 1

Stripunsky-QNS (2601) - Benjamin-NJ (2644) [C41]

ICC 90 30 u/Internet Chess Club 2008


1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 d6

The second time that Benjamin has chosen the Philidor in USCL match play this season. It secured him a draw in Round 5 against GM Kudrin. It seems practically a bullet-proof weapon for Black on first board.

 

3. d4 exd4 4. Qxd4 a6

I like this move, which I have not looked at closely before. I have generally played 4... Nf6 5. Nc3 Be7 6. Bg5 O-O 7. O-O-O Nc6 8. Qd2 Be6 with positions resembling the Antoshin lines.

 

5. Bg5 Nc6

 










6. Qd2

6. Bxd8 Nxd4 7. Nxd4 Kxd8 8. Bc4 Nh6 9. Nc3 c6 and "the two Bishops should guarantee Black an easy life in the endgame" notes Bauer.

 

6... Be7!

This seems the most logical move, trying to exchange "bad bishop" for "good."

6... Nf6 7. Nc3 Be7 reaches more standard Philidor positions.

 

7. Bxe7 Qxe7 8. Nc3 Nf6 9. O-O-O O-O 10. Nd5

10. Bd3 Nb4 11. Rhe1 Be6 12. a3 Nxd3+ 13. Qxd3 Rfe8= Seel

 

10... Qd8

10... Qxe4?! 11. Nxf6+ gxf6 12. Bd3 is too ugly to consider seriously.

 

11. Qf4 Re8 12. Bc4

a) 12. Nxf6+ Qxf6 13. Qxf6 gxf6 is pretty much equal with the Queens off the board.

b) 12. Bd3 Ng4! is given by Seel: 13. Rd2 Nce5 (13... Be6 14. h3 Nge5=) 14. Nxe5 dxe5 15. Qf3 c6 16. h3 cxd5 17. hxg4 d4 18. Rh5 Qa5 19. Bc4 Be6 leading to equality.

 

12... Nxd5 13. Bxd5

13. exd5 Ne5= (13... b5!?)

 

13... Be6 14. Rhe1 Qd7! 15. Re3!?

15. Kb1 Nb4 16. Bxe6 Qxe6 17. b3 Nc6= Seel

 

15... Nb4!

This seems simplest and best. Other moves risk material loss:

a) 15... Bxd5 16. exd5 Rxe3 17. dxc6! (17. Qxe3 Ne7 18. Qe4 Re8 19. Re1 h6 20. Nd4 Kf8 21. Qh7 Ng8=) 17... Rxf3 18. cxb7 Rb8 19. Qxf3 c6 20. Qa3 Qxb7 21. Rxd6

b) 15... Ne7 16. Bxb7!? Rab8 17. Bd5

 

16. a3

16. Rb3 Qa4!

 

16... Nxd5 17. exd5 Bg4 18. Rde1 Rxe3 19. Rxe3 Bxf3 20. Qxf3 Re8 21. Qe2 Rxe3 22. Qxe3 g6=

White may appear to have more space and temporary control of the e-file, but these are insufficient claims on advantage. It seems Benjamin has chosen an "unbeatable" opening in the Philidor for team play.

 

23. b3 Qf5

Fritz points out 23... Qg4! 24. g3 Qh5 forking two pawns, and 25. Qa7 Qxh2 26. Qxb7 Qxf2 favors Black.

 

24. c4 Qf6 25. Kb1 a5 26. g4 h5 27. h3 hxg4 28. hxg4 Qh4 29. f3 Qh2 30. b4 axb4 31. axb4 Qg2 32. Qc3 Qe2 33. Kc1 b6 34. Kb1 Kf8 35. g5?! Kg8 36. Kc1 Qf2 37. Kb1 Qe2 38. Kc1










38... Qg2!

Suddenly White's pawns are overextended and one must fall.

 

39. Kb1

39. Qe3 Qf1+ 40. Kb2 Qxc4 also snags a pawn.

 

39... Qxg5 40. Kb2 Qf5 41. Ka3 Kh7 42. Ka4 Qd7+ 43. Kb3 Qe7 44. Qd4 g5 45. Qg4 Kg6

You have to use your King in Queen endings if you are to make any progress.

 

46. Qc8 Kf6 47. Ka4 Ke5 48. Kb5 Kd4 49. Kc6 Kxc4 50. Qg4+ Kb3! 51. b5 Kc3 52. f4










52... gxf4

A safe play, but it will be impossible to escape perpetual after this. It is very difficult to calculate lines in Queen endings, but Fritz suggests: 52... Qe8+! 53. Kxc7 Qxb5 54. Qf3+ (54. Kxd6? Qc5+ 55. Ke5 Qd4+ 56. Kd6 Qxf4+ 57. Qxf4 gxf4 58. Ke7 f3) 54... Kd4 55. fxg5 Qxd5

 

53. Qxf4 Kd3 54. Qf3+ Kd4 55. Qd1+ Kc4 56. Qc2+ Kd4 57. Qd2+ Kc4 58. Qc2+ Kd4 59. Qd1+ Kc4 60. Qa4+ Kc3 61. Qa3+ Kc4 62. Qa2+ Kc3 63. Qa1+ Kc4 64. Qf1+ Kb4 65. Qb1+ Kc4 66. Qc2+ Kd4 67. Qd1+ Kc4 68. Qc2+ Kd4

Game drawn by repetition

1/2-1/2

Board 2

Gulko-NJ (2618) - Vovsha-QNS (2532) [B07]

ICC 90 30 u/Internet Chess Club 2008


1. d4 d6 2. e4 Nf6 3. Nc3 g6 4. Bg5 Bg7 5. Qd2 h6 6. Be3!?

6. Bf4 g5 7. Bg3 (7. Be3 Ng4) 7... Nh5 8. O-O-O with double-edged play.

 

6... Ng4 7. Bf4 e5 8. dxe5 Nxe5

8... dxe5? 9. Qxd8+ Kxd8 10. O-O-O+ (10. Bg3 h5 11. Nf3 f6 12. Rd1+ Nd7 13. Nh4 g5 14. Nf5 Rh7 15. h4 gxh4 16. Rxh4 Bf8 17. Be2 Nh6 18. Rxh5 c6 19. Bh4 Kc7 20. g4 Rh8 21. Rxd7+ Bxd7 22. Bxf6 Bxf5 23. Bxh8 Bxg4 24. Rxh6 1-0 Sorokin,M-Szmetan,J/Buenos Aires 1998) 10... Nd7 (10... Bd7 11. Bg3 h5 12. Nf3) 11. Bg3 h5 12. h3 Nh6 13. Nf3 f6 14. Nxe5 fxe5 15. Bh4+ g5 16. Bxg5+ Ke8 17. Nd5 Kf7 18. Nxc7 Rb8 19. Rd6 Bf6 20. h4 Ng4 21. Bc4+ Kf8 22. Bb5 Bxg5+ 23. hxg5 Nxf2 24. Rf1 Ke7 25. Rh6 Rf8 26. Nd5+ Ke8 27. Nf6+ Rxf6 28. gxf6 Nxe4 29. Bxd7+ Bxd7 30. Rh8+ Kf7 31. Rxb8 Bc6 32. Rh8 1-0 Krayz,A-Ibragimov,I/Groningen 1994.

 

9. O-O-O

I like the way Gulko plays this. Other interesting games from this position include:

a) 9. h4 h5 10. O-O-O Nbc6 11. Kb1 Be6 12. Nd5 f6 13. Bb5 Qd7 14. Ne2 O-O-O 15. Nd4 Qf7 16. Nxe6 Qxe6 17. Rh3 a6 18. Be2 Ng4 19. Rc3 Nxf2 20. Rxc6 bxc6 21. Nxc7!? (21. Qa5!! cxd5 22. Bxa6+ Kd7 23. exd5) 21... Kxc7 22. Qa5+ Kd7 23. Rxd6+ Qxd6 24. Bxd6 Kxd6 25. Qb4+ Kc7 26. Qa5+?! (26. Qc5 Nxe4 27. Qa7+ Kd6 28. Qxg7) 26... Kd6 27. Qxa6? Nxe4 28. Qa7 Nd2+ 29. Ka1 Rd7 30. Qa3+ Ke6 31. Qe3+ Kf7 32. Bd3 Bh6 33. Qc5 Re8 34. a3 Rxd3 35. Qxc6 Rde3 36. Qd7+ R3e7 37. Qd5+ Kg7 38. Ka2 Re5 39. Qc6 R5e6 40. Qc3 Re3 41. Qa5 R8e7 42. b3 Re2 43. g3 Nf1 0-1 Wolfe,J-Parsons,L/Seattle 1980.

 

b) 9. Be3!? Nbc6 10. h3 g5 11. g3 Be6 12. Nd5 Ne7 13. f4 gxf4 14. gxf4 N5c6 15. O-O-O f5 16. Bc4 Bf7 17. exf5 Nxd5 18. Bxd5 Qd7 19. Ne2 Qxf5 20. Bxc6+ bxc6 21. Bd4 Bxd4 22. Nxd4 Qd5 23. Qc3 Qc4 24. Qxc4 Bxc4 25. Nxc6 Kf7 26. Nd4 Kf6 27. b3 Bf7 28. Rhg1 a6 29. Rde1 Rhg8 30. Kd2 c5 31. Ne2 Be6 32. c4 h5 33. Ng3 Bxh3 34. Nxh5+ Kf5 35. Ke3 Rae8+ 36. Kf3 Rxe1 37. Rxg8 Rf1+ 38. Ke3 Re1+ 39. Kf3 Rf1+ 40. Ke3 Re1+ 41. Kd2 Ra1 42. a4 Ke4 43. Rg6 d5 44. cxd5 Kxd5 45. Rxa6 c4 46. Nf6+ Kc5 47. Ra5+ Kb6 48. b4 Be6 49. Nd5+ Kc6 50. Nc3 1-0 Nakamura,H (2494)-Zhao Jun (2363)/Shanghai CHN 2002.

 

9... Nbc6 10. Be2

In the stem game of this line, White got a tremendous attack but misplayed it: 10. h3 Be6 11. Be3 Nc4 12. Bxc4 Bxc4 13. Nf3 Be6 14. Nd5 Qd7 15. Rhe1 O-O-O 16. Nd4 Ne5 17. Qa5 a6 18. b3 Rde8 19. c4 Bxd5 20. cxd5 Qe7 21. Re2 Nd7 22. Rc2 Nb8 23. b4 Qd8 24. f3 Rhf8 25. Kb1 Re7 26. Rdc1 Rd7 (26... Bxd4) 27. Nb3 (27. Nf5!! gxf5 28. Bb6) 27... f5 28. b5 (28. Qb6! Rff7 29. Na5) 28... fxe4 29. b6?! c6 30. fxe4 Qe7 31. dxc6?! Nxc6 32. Rxc6+ bxc6 33. Qxa6+ Kb8 34. Rc4?! Rf1+ 35. Kc2 Qe5 36. Nd4? (36. Qa3!) 36... Qxe4+ 37. Kb3 Qxe3+ 38. Ka4 Bxd4 39. b7 Rxb7 40. Qxc6 Ra7+ 41. Kb5 Rb1+ 0-1 Zaitsev,I-Savon,V/Yerevan 1962.

 

10... Be6 11. Nd5 Ne7 12. h3 Qd7 13. Kb1

13. Qa5!? b6 14. Qa6 O-O 15. Nf3

 

13... Bxd5 14. exd5 Qa4 15. Nf3 Nxf3

15... O-O-O 16. b3 Qa3 (16... Nxf3!? 17. Bxf3 Qa3 18. c4 Kb8) 17. Nd4 Nxd5 18. Nb5 Qb4 19. Qxb4 (19. Qxd5 Qxf4) 19... Nxb4 20. Nxa7+ Kb8 21. Nb5 (21. Be3 c6) 21... g5 22. Bc1

 

16. Bxf3 g5 17. Bh2 O-O-O 18. Rhe1 Rde8










19. Re4! Qb5

19... Qd7 20. Rde1 Kb8 (20... Ng6?? 21. Bg4) 21. Qe2 Bf6 22. Bg4 Qd8 23. Qb5

 

20. c4 Qd7 21. c5! Kb8 22. c6! Qd8 23. Qb4 b6 24. Qb5 Ng6

24... f5 25. Ra4 Qc8 26. Rd3

 

25. Bg4! Qf6?

a) 25... Ka8 26. Ra4 Qf6 (26... Qb8 27. Rd3) 27. Bxd6!! cxd6 28. c7 Qxb2+ 29. Qxb2 Bxb2 30. Kxb2

b) 25... f5 26. Qa6 Qc8 27. Qxc8+ Rxc8 28. Bxf5

 

26. Rb4

Black resigns. Gulko continues to dominate strong opponents on Board 2.

1-0

Board 3

Lenderman-QNS (2528) - Ippolito-NJ (2500) [B30]

ICC 90 30 u/Internet Chess Club 2008


Both Lenderman and Ippolito were in contention for MVP honors this season, so their match-up had special significance.

1. e4 c5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. Bb5 e6 4. Bxc6 bxc6 5. e5 f6 6. O-O fxe5

Opening specialist Jacob Aagaard demonstrated an even better method against White's system: 6... Nh6! 7. Re1 Nf7 8. d4 cxd4 9. Qxd4 Be7! 10. Bd2 O-O 11. Bc3 fxe5 12. Nxe5 Bf6 13. Qe3 Nxe5 14. Bxe5 Bxe5 15. Qxe5 Qb6! 16. Re2 (16. Re3 Rf5 17. Qc3 Rc5 18. Qe1 Qxb2) 16... Rf5 17. Qc3 Ba6 18. Re3 Raf8 19. Nd2 Rxf2 20. Rae1 d5 21. Nf3 R2xf3 22. gxf3 d4 23. Qb3 dxe3 24. Qxe6+ Kh8 25. Qe7 e2+ 0-1 Karlsson,A (2305)-Aagaard,J (2403)/Hafnarfjordur ISL 1999.

 

7. Nxe5 Nf6 8. f4!?










Perhaps an attempt at improvement on 8. d3 d6 9. Nc4 Be7 10. Bg5 O-O 11. Nbd2 h6 12. Bh4 g5! 13. Bg3 e5! 14. Re1 Nd5 when Black controlled f4, though he managed to lose the game in 1-0 Majeric,Z (2345) -Jankovic,A (2548)/Zadar CRO 2007 (54).

 

8... d6 9. Nc4 Be7 10. d3 O-O 11. Nc3 Nd5 12. Bd2 Nb6 13. Qe2 Bf6

Black's chief difficulty is in finding a way to mobilize his central pawn mass without creating weaknesses.

13... Nxc4 14. dxc4 Rb8 15. b3 Bf6 16. Rad1 (16. Rae1!?) 16... Bd4+ 17. Kh1 is similar to the game.

 

14. Rad1 Bd4+ 15. Kh1 Nxc4 16. dxc4 e5 17. Ne4! exf4

Black must act or have his Bishop trapped and his pawns become targets.

a) 17... Bxb2? 18. Rb1 (18. c3!? d5 19. Be3) 18... Ba3 19. fxe5

b) 17... d5!? might be tried: 18. Ng5 (18. c3 dxe4 19. cxd4 exd4 20. Qxe4 Qf6) 18... h6 19. c3 exf4!

 

18. Bxf4 Re8

18... Qh4!? 19. Bxd6 (19. Bg3 Bg4!) 19... Bg4 20. Rxf8+ Rxf8 21. Rf1! Rd8

 

19. Bxd6!?

This is an teresting sacrifice of two pieces for a Rook, but White may have had a simpler solution:

19. Qf3! Bg4 (19... d5 20. Bg5!) 20. Qxg4 Rxe4 21. Qf3

 

19... Qxd6 20. Nf6+ Bxf6 21. Qxe8+ Qf8 22. Qxc6 Bg4

22... Rb8! 23. Qd5+ Kh8 avoids the danger of the text move.

 

23. Rd6 Kh8 24. h3 Bh5

24... Be2!? 25. Rf4 Qg8 26. Re6 Bh5

 

25. g4 Rc8?!

Black is in a bad way due to the threat of g4-g5, but there seems no perfect solution.

a) 25... Bf7 26. g5 Rd8 27. Rxd8 Bxd8 28. Qd7 Be7 29. Qxa7

b) 25... Rb8!? 26. gxh5 Rb6 27. Rdxf6 gxf6 28. Qe4 Rxb2 29. h6!

 

26. Qd7 Bf7 27. g5 Rd8










28. Qxf7! Qxd6 29. gxf6 gxf6

29... Qc6+ 30. Kg1 Rg8 31. Kh2! Qd6+ 32. Kh1 Qc6+ 33. Qd5

 

30. Qxf6+ Qxf6 31. Rxf6 Rd2 32. Ra6! Rxc2 33. b3 Kg7 34. h4!?

34. Rxa7+ Kg6 35. Rc7! Kg5!? (35... Rxa2 36. Rxc5) 36. Rxc5+ Kh4 37. Rd5 Kxh3 38. Rd3+ Kg4 39. a4

 

34... h5 35. Rxa7+ Kg6 36. Ra5 Kf5 37. Rxc5+ Kg4 38. Rg5+ Kxh4 39. Rg2 Rc1+ 40. Kh2

 










40... Rxc4! 41. Rb2

41. bxc4 is stalemate, of course. But Lenderman has an easy win if he just doesn't take the Rook!

 

41... Rc3 42. b4 Rh3+ 43. Kg2 Rg3+ 44. Kh1 Rc3 45. b5 Rc1+

45... Kh3 46. Rb3!

 

46. Kh2 Kg4 47. b6 Rc8 48. b7 Rb8 49. a4 Kf4 50. a5

Black resigns. A fine game for Lenderman.

1-0

Board 4

AndrewNg-NJ (2175) - Ostrovskiy-QNS (2042) [C54]

ICC 90 30 u/Internet Chess Club 2008


1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. Bc4 Nf6 4. d3 Bc5 5. c3 a6 6. O-O Ba7 7. Bg5 h6 8. Bh4 d6 9. Nbd2

After analyzing this game, I have a lot of respect for the Closed Giuoco lines, where White has generally done very well. One game from this position continued 9. a4 Qe7 10. Nbd2 O-O 11. b4 Nd8 12. Re1 Ne6 13. Nf1 g5 14. Bg3 Nf4 15. Ne3 c6 16. b5 Bd7 17. Rb1 cxb5 18. axb5 axb5 19. Bxb5 Be6 20. Bc4 Rfc8 21. Nd2 Kh7 22. Rb3 Bc5 23. Qb1! Rc7?! 24. d4! Ba7 25. Nd5 Bxd5 26. exd5+ Kg7 27. dxe5 dxe5 28. Qf5 Rac8 29. Rxe5 Qd7 30. Bxf4 Qxf5 31. Rxf5 gxf4 32. Rxf4 1-0 Hida-Urban,M/Schwabisch 1994 (39).

 

9... Qe7 10. b4 Be6 11. a4 O-O 12. Re1

White might break on the queenside immediately with 12. b5! Nb8!? (the knight seems misplaced after 12... Na5 13. Bxe6 Qxe6 14. Re1) 13. Qb3 Nbd7 14. Rfb1 g5 15. Bg3 Nh5 16. bxa6 bxa6 17. Qc2 Nxg3 18. hxg3 Bxc4 19. Nxc4 Qe6 20. Qe2 f5 21. exf5 Qxf5 22. d4 g4 23. Nh4 Qg5 24. Rb7 exd4 25. Qe6+ Rf7 26. Rxc7 dxc3 27. Rxd7 Bxf2+ 28. Kh1 Raf8 29. Rxf7 Rxf7 30. Nxd6 1-0 Wong,R-Grey,P/San Francisco 2001.

 

12... Bxc4

12... g5 13. Bg3 Kh7 14. Qc2 Nh5 15. Rad1 f5 16. exf5 Bxf5 17. b5 axb5 18. axb5 Nb8 19. Bd5 c6 20. Be4 Qf6 21. d4 Nxg3 22. hxg3 Nd7 23. bxc6 bxc6 24. g4 Bg6 25. Qa4 d5 26. Bxd5 cxd5 27. Qxd7+ Rf7 28. Qxd5 Re8 29. Rxe5 Rd8 30. Qc4 Bb8 31. Re6 Qf4 32. Rde1 Rdf8 33. Qc6 Bc2 34. Rxh6+ Kg7 35. Rh5 Rf6 36. Re7+ Kg6 37. Reh7 Qxg4 38. R5h6+ Kf5 39. Qd5+ 1-0 Farachi,F-Vignoli,M/Milan 2006.

 

13. Nxc4 Qe6 14. b5 Ne7! 15. Qb3 Ng6 16. Bg3 Nh5 17. Rab1 Nxg3?!

Taking the Bishop looks like a mistake, mostly because it is simply a bad piece. It looks like Black has good chances of equality by 17... Ngf4! since White will not want to exchange on f4 and hand that square to Black. After 17...Nxg3?! White gets rid of his worst piece and gains control over f4.

 

18. hxg3 Ne7

18... axb5 19. axb5 (19. Qxb5 Rfb8) 19... Rfc8 20. Re2

 

19. b6! cxb6 20. Nxb6 Rad8 21. Qxe6 fxe6 22. Re2! Nc6 23. Nc4

23. g4 Na5! (23... g5 24. Nc4) 24. g5 Rf7 25. gxh6 gxh6 26. Nd2

 

23... Rd7 24. Reb2 Rff7 25. Kf1

25. g4 Bc5 26. g5

 

25... Kf8 26. Nb6 Bxb6!? 27. Rxb6 Ke8 28. Nd2 Na5! 29. Ke2 Kd8 30. Ke3 Nc6 31. f4 exf4+?!

31... g5!? 32. fxe5 (32. Rf1 Kc7 33. Rbb1 exf4+ 34. gxf4 gxf4+ 35. Rxf4 Rxf4 36. Kxf4 Rg7 37. g3 Ne5 38. d4 Rf7+ 39. Ke3 Ng4+ 40. Kd3 Rf2) 32... Nxe5 33. Nf3! Nxf3 34. gxf3 h5 35. Rh1 Rh7 is a very difficult ending for White to try to win.

 

32. gxf4 d5 33. g3

A better way to exploit Black's last was 33. Nb3! (heading for Nc5) 33... e5 34. f5 d4+ 35. cxd4 Nxd4 36. Nc5!

 

33... d4+ 34. cxd4 Nxd4 35. Nc4 Nc6 36. e5!

Creating a beautiful square for the Knight. Perhaps 36. Rxc6!? bxc6 37. Ne5 Rb7 (37... Kc7 38. a5!) 38. Nxf7+ Rxf7 39. Rb6 was a safe way to play for the win.

 

36... Rfe7 37. Nd6 Na5 38. Ne4 Rc7 39. Rd6+ Kc8 40. Rbb6 Rc6 41. Rbxc6+ Nxc6 42. Nc5 Nd8 43. d4 Kc7 44. g4 g6 45. Kf3

White wins quickly with 45. d5! h5 (45... exd5 46. Rxg6) (45... g5 46. Nxe6+ Nxe6 47. dxe6 gxf4+ 48. Kxf4) 46. gxh5 gxh5 47. Nxe6+ Nxe6 48. dxe6 h4 49. f5 h3 50. f6 Ng has played the game so wonderfully up to here, it is a shame to see him slowly spoil it, likely due to time pressure.

 

45... Nc6 46. Ke4 Nd8 47. d5 exd5+ 48. Kxd5 h5

48... g5 49. f5 Rxe5+ 50. Kxe5 Nf7+ 51. Ke6 Nxd6 52. f6

 

49. Rxg6 hxg4 50. Rxg4 Nc6 51. e6

Maybe better is 51. Ne6+ Kc8 (51... Kb6 52. Rg7 Re8 53. f5) 52. Rg8+ Kd7 53. f5

 

51... b6? 52. Nd3?!

Certainly winning was 52. Nxa6+! Kb7 53. f5! when Black cannot exploit the Knight's position due to his own Knight hanging -- and meanwhile White's pawns get rolling.

 

52... Rh7 53. Rg5?!

53. f5! Ne7+ 54. Ke4 Kd6 55. Nf4 Rh6 56. Rg3

 

53... Ne7+ 54. Ke4?!

54. Ke5! Nc6+ 55. Kf6 seems like a clear winning line, and perhaps the last one available.

 

54... Kd6 55. Re5 Rh2 56. Kf3 Rh6 57. Nb2 b5 58. axb5 axb5 59. Rxb5 Rxe6

Suddenly the endgame is going to be hell to win, since Black can always sac the Knight for the pawn, bringing about the notoriously drawn R+N v R ending.

 

60. Nc4+ Kd7 61. Ne5+ Kc7 62. Ke4 Ra6 63. Rb4 Ra1 64. Rd4 Re1+ 65. Kf3 Nf5 66. Rd2 Rg1 67. Ke4 Ng3+ 68. Kd5 Rf1 69. Rc2+ Kb7 70. Rc4 Nh5 71. Ng6 Kb6 72. Ke6 Kb5 73. Rd4 Re1+ 74. Kd6 Nf6

74... Nxf4! right away guaranteed the draw.

 

75. Ne5 Rf1 76. Ke6 Nh5 77. Nd3 Nxf4+! 78. Nxf4 Kc5

 

 

79. Re4 Rh1 80. Nd3+ Kc6 81. Rc4+ Kb5 82. Rc3 Rh6+ 83. Kd5 Rh5+ 84. Ne5 Kb4 85. Rc8 Rh1 86. Nd3+ Kb3 87. Nf2 Rh5+ 88. Kd4 Rh7 89. Rc3+ Kb4 90. Nd3+ Kb5 91. Rc5+ Kb6 92. Ne5 Rh4+ 93. Kd5 Rh1 94. Nd7+ Kb7 95. Kd6 Rh6+

Game drawn by mutual agreement. White missed many winning chances here, likely in time pressure.

1/2-1/2

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