By Michael Goeller

If I could redo my Urusov Gambit System website, I think I would recommend that players meet 1.e4 e5 2.Bc4 Nc6 with a transposition to the Giuoco Piano, 3.Nf3 Bc5 4.c3 Nf6 intending the interesting Steinitz - Sveshnikov Attack with 5.d4 exd4 6.e5!

I first saw this old line discussed by Jude Acers as part of his excellent Italian Gambit System, and my experiences with the line against players rated below 2000 has been almost universally positive. As Acers predicts in his book, nearly all opponents below master fail to play one of the few correct lines and go down to speedy defeat. The recent game Ni Hua - Marin (see below) suggests that even GMs can get blown off the board with it!

These lines can be reached from various move orders, including the Scotch Gambit (1.e4 e5 2.Nf3 Nc6 3.d4 exd4 4.Bc4 Bc5 5.c3 Nf6 6.e5!) or traditional Giuoco Piano (3.Bc4 Bc5 4.c3 Nf6 5.d4 etc.) and makes a good fit with the Modern Variation of the Two Knights Defense (1.e4 e5 2.Nf3 Nc6 3.Bc4 Nf6 4.d4 exd4 5.e5!) since the similar pawn positions lead to similar positional themes and tactical motifs between the two lines. Readers of my Urusov Gambit materials, Acers' book, or the recent Chess Openings for White, Explained will probably find this line very appealing (at least for an occasional weapon), and developing players will score many points with it.

What follows is a collection of games with the line that should give you its main ideas and motifs. I recommend you look at these closely with a computer and do your own analysis so that you are thoroughly prepared to play for the win. I have focused most on the lines you are most likely to see in your games.

Line A: 6...Ng4?

This move is a common blunder, since Ng4 is often playable in analogous positions of the Max Lange. Here, however, White's c3 move makes all the difference and he has his choice of two ways to gain a big edge.

Game One

Alexander Seyb - Richard Schoettler [C53]

GER-chT Clubs U12/Verden (7) 1999


1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. Bc4 Bc5 4. c3 Nf6 5. d4 exd4 6. e5 Ng4?










7. Bxf7+!?

In many comparable positions, this temporary sacrifice is not usually accurate. But here Black cannot tuck his King away at g8 due to mate along the a2-g8 diagonal, which means that his King will be exposed for the rest of the game.

It's hard to say whether the flashy 7.Bxf7+ is objectively better than the simpler 7. cxd4 Bb4+ 8. Nc3 d5 (8... d6 9. h3 dxe5!? (9... Nh6 10. Bxh6 gxh6 11. Qb3 Rf8? (11... Bxc3+ 12. bxc3 O-O 13. O-O) 12. O-O! Bd7 (12... Bxc3 13. exd6! Bxd4? (13... Qxd6 14. bxc3) 14. Rae1+) 13. Nd5 1-0 Halkova,E-Zakova,J/Valtice 1991) 10. d5! (10. hxg4 exd4 11. a3 Ba5 12. b4 dxc3 (12... Nxb4? 13. axb4 Bxb4 14. Qa4+) 13. Qxd8+ Kxd8 14. bxa5) 10... e4 11. hxg4 exf3 12. dxc6 Qxd1+ 13. Kxd1 fxg2 14. Re1+! Kd8 15. cxb7) (8... O-O 9. h3 Nh6 10. Bxh6 gxh6 11. O-O Ne7 12. Ne4 d5 13. Nf6+ Kh8 14. Bd3 Ng6 15. Qb3 Be7 16. Nxd5 Kg7 17. Nxe7 Qxe7 18. Rac1 1-0 Halkova,E-Kovarova,L/Valtice 1992 (40)) 9. Bd3 (9. Bb5) 9... Be6 10. O-O Qd7 11. a3 Ba5 12. Na4! Ne7? 13. Nc5 Qc8 14. Qa4+ Nc6 15. Bb5 (15. Ba6!!) 15... Bd7 16. Nxd7 Qxd7 17. Bxc6 Qxc6 18. Qxa5 b6 19. Qc3 Qd7 20. Be3 Rc8 21. Rac1 c6 22. Qd2 h5 23. Rfe1 Qe6 24. Bg5 c5 25. Qf4 Nh6 26. Bxh6 Rxh6 27. Ng5 Qe7 28. h4 a5 29. Re3 c4 30. Rce1 Rcc6 31. Qf5 g6 32. Qf4 Rh8 33. e6 1-0 Halkova,E-Korinkova,G/Moravia 1994.

 

7... Kxf7

7... Kf8 8. cxd4 Ngxe5 (8... Bb4+ 9. Nc3 d6 10. e6! This move is thematic in the position and has a long-term cramping effect. If Black wins the pawn, he may face further attack by d5. 10... Qf6 (10... h6 11. h3 (11. O-O Bxc3 12. bxc3 Qf6 13. h3 Bxe6 14. Bxe6 Qxe6 15. d5 Qg6 16. dxc6 1-0 Haber,K-Litwiniec,Z/Krynica 1998) 11... Nf6 12. Nh4! g5? (12... Ne7 13. O-O) 13. Ng6+ Kg7 14. Nxh8 Kxh8 15. O-O Bxc3 16. bxc3 1-0 Kazmierczak,R-Klimaszewska,A/Augustow 1997 (32)) 11. O-O Bxe6 12. Bxe6 Bxc3 13. bxc3 Qg6 (13... Qxe6 14. d5 Qd7 15. dxc6 Qxc6 16. Nd4) 14. d5 Nce5 15. Nxe5 Nxe5 16. Bf4 Nd3 17. Qf3 Ke8 18. Rad1 Nc5 19. Rfe1 Kd8 20. Qg4 Qxg4 21. Bxg4 Re8 22. Bg5+ 1-0 Feodorovici,V-Hein,T/Timisoara 1995) 9. Nxe5 Nxe5 10. dxe5 Kxf7 11. Qd5+ Ke8 12. Qxc5 Rf8 13. O-O Qh4 14. e6!? d6 15. Qxc7 Bxe6 16. Nc3 Rd8 17. Nb5 Rd7 18. Nxd6+ Ke7 19. Qc5 Kf6 20. g3 Qg4 21. Bf4 Kg6 22. h3 Qh5 23. Qxh5+ Kxh5 24. g4+ Kh4 25. Bg3+ Kxh3 26. Rfe1 Bxg4 27. Rac1 Rf6 28. Ne4 Rg6 29. Rc4 h5 30. Rc3 Rf7 31. f4 Rf5 32. Nf2# 1-0 Jakomet,A-Wiesinger,W/Lienz 1988.

 

8. Ng5+ Ke8

8... Kg8?? 9. Qb3+ d5 10. exd6+ Be6 11. Qxe6+ Kf8 12. Qf7# 1-0 Eberlein,M-Wolf,C/Verden 2000

8... Kf8!? might be playable, but Black is clearly worse due to his uncomfortable king position.

 

9. Qxg4 dxc3?

9... Nxe5 10. Qe4 Qe7 11. O-O h6 12. cxd4 Bxd4 13. Qxd4 hxg5 14. Nc3 Bilguer / Acers . White will continue with Ne4, Nd5, or f4 with a very strong attack.

 

10. Nxc3 d6 11. e6! Qf6 12. O-O b6?










12... Ne7 13. Nb5

 

13. Nd5! Qf8

13... Qd8 14. Nf7

 

14. Nxc7+ Ke7 15. Nf7 h6 16. Qh4+ g5 17. Bxg5+ hxg5 18. Qxg5# 1-0


Line B: 6...Ne4?!

Players who like to meet the Modern Variation of the Two Knights with Ne4 will often fall into this trap, not recognizing that they practically lose a piece by force after 7.Bd5! However, Black does get some play for the material, so this line repays close study and analysis.

Game Two

Sunil Weeramantry - Art Marthinsen [C53]

USA-ch op 94th/Philadelphia 1993


1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. Bc4 Bc5 4. c3 Nf6 5. d4 exd4 6. e5 Ne4?!

 










7. Bd5!

This move forces major concessions or the win of material and therefore must be theory's choice. But Tartakower says that White appears to be "looking for adventure" since he "could have enjoyed a peaceful life" by 7. cxd4 Bb4+ 8. Bd2 Nxd2 9. Nbxd2 d5 10. Bb5 transposing to lines considered below. The danger to White's King in the game line is of little consequence, however, and he cannot expect to live a "peaceful life" if he wants to win.

 

7... Nxf2!

Definitely Black's best try. The alternative simply hands White complete control:

7... f5 8. cxd4 (8. O-O!?) 8... Bb4+ 9. Bd2 Nxd2 10. Nbxd2 Ne7 11. Bb3 d5 12. exd6 Bxd6 13. O-O and Black's king is stuck in the center where plenty of action is about to take place.

 

8. Kxf2 dxc3+ 9. Kg3!?

"Book" but probably too risky, especially in blitz. I would recommend the alternatives:

a) 9. Ke1 cxb2 10. Bxb2 O-O 11. Qc1?! (11. Nc3) 11... d6 (11... b6!) 12. Rf1 Re8 13. Bxf7+ Kxf7 14. Qc4+ Kg6 15. Qe4+ Kf7 16. Ng5+ 1-0 Negrini,N-Marzoli/Bologna 1987.

b) 9. Kf1! must be best, and is certainly safest 9... cxb2 10. Bxb2 O-O 11. Nc3! (11. Qc2 b6!) 11... d6 (11... b6!? 12. g3!) 12. Ne4

 

9... cxb2 10. Bxb2 h5?

10... Ne7! 11. Be4 (11. Ng5? Nxd5 (11... Nf5+!? 12. Kf4 Be3+ 13. Kxf5 Qxg5+ 14. Ke4 O-O) 12. Nxf7? O-O! (12... Kxf7? 13. Qxd5+ Kg6 14. Qxc5) (12... Qe7! 13. Qxd5 Rf8) 13. Nxd8 (13. Qxd5? Rxf7 14. Qxc5? Qg5+ 15. Kh3 d6+) 13... Bf2+ 14. Kh3 d6+ 15. e6 Nf4+ 16. Kg4 Nxe6 17. g3 Nd4+ 18. Ne6 Bxe6+ 19. Kh4 Nf5+ 20. Kh3 Ne3+ 21. Kh4 Ng2+ 22. Kh5 g6+ 23. Kg5 Be3# 0-1 Hoffman,F-Petrov,A/Warsaw 1844 is a famous and beautiful game) (11. Qc2!? d6 12. Be4 Fritz) 11... d5 12. exd6 Bxd6+ 13. Kf2 Bc5+ 14. Bd4 Bxd4+ 15. Qxd4 and I believe in the power of the piece over the pawns.

 

11. Bxf7+! Kf8

11... Kxf7 12. Qd5+ Kf8 13. Qxc5+

 

12. h4 Ne7 13. Qd3 d6 14. e6 Rh6 15. Ng5 1-0


Line C: 6...Qe7?!

Amateurs very often play this move (either here or after 6...d5 7.Bb5 Qe7?! discussed below). I suppose they think they are gaining time by not moving the Knight. But it is usually a bad idea to put your Queen in front of your King in the open games, where the e-file might open up with deadly consequences to the two monarchs!

Game Three

Paul Morphy - James Cunningham [C53]

London sim blind/London 1859


1. e4 e5 2. Nf3

The actual move order was 2. Bc4 Bc5 3. c3 Nc6 4. Nf3 Nf6 5. d4 exd4 6. e5

2... Nc6 3. Bc4 Bc5 4. c3 Nf6 5. d4 exd4 6. e5 Qe7?!

Jude Acers notes: "Players of the White pieces will swiftly win gamesthroughout their careers against anything but direct center counterplay by Black [by d5]. All piece moves are bad." The Queen is exposed to attacks along the e-file, along the h4-d8 diagonal, and sometimes by Nc3-d5 etc. Another common error at this point is 6... dxc3? which seems essentially a counting mistake: Black is down a piece after 7. exf6 Qxf6 8. Qe2+ Ne7 9. Nxc3 c6 10. O-O d5 11. Bg5 Qg6 12. Bd3 Qh5 13. h3 Be6 14. Bf4 h6 15. Na4 Bb4 16. a3 Ba5 17. Nc5 g5 18. Nxe6 gxf4 19. Nxf4 1-0 George,N-Jorgensen,M/Menorca 1996.

 

7. O-O!?

This may be the most forcing continuation, but better may be

7. cxd4! Bb4+ 8. Nc3! (8. Kf1!?) 8... d6 (8... Ne4 9. Qc2 Nxc3 (9... Bxc3+ 10. bxc3 f5 11. O-O d6 12. exd6 cxd6 13. Re1) 10. bxc3 Ba5 11. O-O h6 (11... O-O 12. Ng5! g6 13. Ne4 Kg7 14. Bg5 Qa3 15. Bf6+ Kg8 16. Qd2) 12. Bd2 d6 13. Rfe1 O-O 14. Bxh6! gxh6 15. Qg6+ Kh8 16. Qxh6+ Kg8 17. Re4 Nxe5 18. dxe5 Be6 19. Rh4 f6 20. Bxe6+ Qxe6 21. Qg6# 1-0 Primavera,C-Ruiz,S/Chapadmalal 2003) (8... d5?! 9. O-O! dxc4 10. exf6 gxf6 (10... Qxf6 11. d5 Bxc3 12. dxc6 Ba5 13. cxb7 Bxb7 14. Qa4+) ) (8... Na5 9. O-O!) (8... Bxc3+ 9. bxc3 d5 10. Bd3 Ne4 11. Qb3) 9. O-O! dxe5 10. dxe5! Ng4 (10... Bxc3 11. bxc3 Ne4 (11... Ng4? 12. Bb5) (11... Nd7 12. Bg5 Qa3 (12... Qc5? 13. Bxf7+!! Kxf7 14. e6+ Kxe6 15. Qb3+ Qd5 16. Rfe1+ Nde5 17. Rxe5+ Nxe5 18. Nd4+ Kd6 19. Be7+) 13. e6 fxe6 14. Bxe6) 12. Bd5 Nc5 13. Bxc6+ bxc6 14. Ba3) 11. Nd5 Qd8 12. Bb5 Bd7 13. Bxc6 Bxc6 14. Nxb4 Qxd1 15. Rxd1 Bxf3 16. gxf3 Nh6 17. Bxh6 gxh6 18. Kh1 Rg8 19. Rg1 Kd7 20. Rad1+ Ke6 21. f4 Rad8 22. Rxg8 Rxd1+ 23. Kg2 Rd4 24. Nc2 Rxf4 25. Rh8 Rg4+ 26. Kf3 Rg7 27. Re8+ Kd7 28. Ra8 b6 29. Rxa7 Rg5 30. Kf4 Rg2 31. Kf3 .. 1-0 Krys,J-Reichel,T/Frymburk 2000.

 

7... Ng8?

a) 7... Nxe5 is necessary, when Black survives by giving up his queen for bishop and Rook after 8. Re1 (8. Nxe5!? Qxe5 9. Re1 Ne4) 8... Nxc4 (8... Nxf3+ 9. gxf3) 9. Rxe7+ Bxe7 10. Qe2 d5 11. cxd4 with at least some advantage to White and certainly the much easier side of the battle -- though these type of positions are worth practicing against your computer, which will defend very well.

b) 7... Ng4? 8. cxd4 Bb4 9. h3 Nh6 10. a3 Ba5 11. b4 Bb6 12. Bxh6 gxh6 13. Nc3 and the threats of d5-d6 or Nd5-f6+ are deadly and unstoppable.

 

8. cxd4

8. Bg5!?

 

8... Bb6

8... Bb4 9. a3 Ba5 10. b4 Bb6 is even worse.

 

9. d5!

9. Re1 Qd8 10. d5 Na5 11. Bg5 f6?? (11... Ne7 12. d6) 12. exf6+ Kf7 13. fxg7 Nf6 14. gxh8=Q Qxh8 15. Bd3 d6 16. b4 Bg4 17. bxa5 Bxa5 18. Nbd2 Rg8 19. Qe2 Nxd5 20. Qe4 1-0 Neugebauer,J-Goetz,K/Weilburg 1996.

 

9... Qc5

a) 9... Na5 10. d6 with the plan of boxing Black in is effective(10. Bd3 with the plan of embarrassing the Knight at a5 is also good, e.g.: 10... Qc5 11. Nc3 Ne7 12. Be3 Qb4 13. Bd2) 10... Qf8 (10... Qd8? 11. Bg5) 11. Bd5

b) 9... Nd8 10. Nc3 Qb4 11. Qe2.

 

10. Na3 Nd4

a) 10... Na5 11. Be3 Qb4 12. Bd2! Qxb2 (12... Qc5 13. b4) (12... Qe7 13. Bd3 and White will win the Knight at a5) 13. Qa4 Nxc4? 14. Nxc4 and Black's Queen is trapped.

b) 10... Nce7 11. Be3

 

11. Be3 Nxf3+ 12. Qxf3 Qf8

12... Qe7 13. d6! cxd6 14. Bg5! f6 (14... Qf8 15. Nb5!) (14... Qxg5 15. Qxf7+ Kd8 16. Qf8+ Kc7 17. Nb5+ Kb8 18. Qxd6+ Bc7 19. Qxc7#) 15. exf6 gxf6 16. Rae1

 

13. Bxb6! axb6










14. Nb5 Kd8

White's super central pawns completely dominate the board and Black's forces sit in confusion upon the first rank. White has too many winning moves to count!

14... Qc5 15. d6

 

15. Rac1 d6 16. exd6 cxd6 17. Qe3 Ra6 18. Nc7 Qe7 19. Ne6+!! fxe6 20. Bxa6 Bd7

20... bxa6 21. Qxb6+ Ke8 22. Rxc8+ Kf7 23. Rc7

 

21. Bb5!? Ke8

21... Bxb5 22. Qxb6+ Ke8 23. Qxb5+

 

22. dxe6 Nf6

22... Bc6

 

23. Rc8+

Black was dead in the opening and the rest of White's attack practically played itself -- though it's impressive that Morphy could conduct it so well in a blindfold simul! Those looking to be precise in the opening, however, should probably prefer 7.cxd4 to Morphy's 7.O-O.

1-0

Line D: 6.e5 d5 7.Bb5 Qe7?!

The following game was played by my one-time student when he was about 8- or 9-years-old. Though White loses, I hope my notes will help you see the real story!

Game Four

Max Sherer - Patrick Thomas [C53]

G 40/5 2007


1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. Bc4 Bc5 4. c3 Nf6 5. d4 exd4 6. e5 d5

In another game from the same tournament against Michael Neary, published in Atlantic Chess News, Patrick had played 6... Qe7? 7. cxd4 (7. O-O!? Nxe5 8. Re1 Nxc4 9. Rxe7+ Bxe7 10. Qe2) 7... Bb4+ 8. Bd2?! (8. Kf1!?) (8. Nc3! d6 (8... Ne4 9. Qc2) (8... d5?! 9. O-O! dxc4 10. exf6 gxf6 (10... Qxf6 11. d5 Bxc3 12. dxc6 Ba5 13. cxb7 Bxb7 14. Qa4+) ) 9. O-O! dxe5 10. dxe5! Bxc3 11. bxc3 Ne4 (11... Ng4? 12. Bb5) (11... Nd7 12. Bg5 Qa3 (12... Qc5? 13. Bxf7+!! Kxf7 14. e6+ Kxe6 15. Qb3+ Qd5 16. Rfe1+ Nde5 17. Rxe5+ Nxe5 18. Nd4+ Kd6 19. Be7+) 13. e6 fxe6 14. Bxe6) 12. Bd5 Nc5 13. Bxc6+ bxc6 14. Ba3) 8... Bxd2+ 9. Nbxd2 d6 10. O-O dxe5 11. dxe5 Ng4 12. Re1 O-O when White should have continued 13. h3! Ngxe5 (13... Nh6 14. Bd5) 14. Nxe5 Nxe5 15. Qh5 Dean Ippolito

 

7. Bb5 Qe7?!










This has to be wrong, since the Queen is needed at d8 to guard the potentially weak pawn at d5. Meanwhile, White is practically given an extra tempo for development, since Black still will need to move his Knight and Bishop anyway--while he did not have to move his Queen. As we see below, best is 7... Ne4 8. cxd4 Bb6!

 

8. O-O!?

This is good -- avoiding Bb4+ lines with exchanges -- but I think White has even better, though I can find no theory or games on this worth anything. Practically winning is 8. cxd4! Bb4+ (8... Bb6? 9. Nc3! xd5 9... Ne4 10. Nxd5) 9. Kf1!! (9. Nc3 is also good for White: 9... Ne4 10. O-O! (10. Qb3!?) 10... Bxc3 (10... Nxc3 11. bxc3 Bxc3 12. Bxc6+ bxc6 13. Qc2 Bxa1 14. Qxc6+ Qd7 15. Qxa8 Bc3 16. Ba3 Ba5 17. e6 Qxe6 18. Qxa7) 11. bxc3 O-O (11... Nxc3? 12. Bxc6+ bxc6 13. Qc2) 12. Qb3 and White's two Bishops and control of space guarantee him a long term edge., while not so bad is 9. Bd2?! Bxd2+?! (9... Ne4!) 10. Nbxd2 Bg4 11. Qc2 Bd7 12. O-O Ng4 13. Rfe1 O-O 14. Bd3 g6 15. a3 Nh6 16. b4 a6 17. Nb3 b6 18. Rac1 Qe6 19. h3 f6? 20. Bxg6! f5 21. Bh5 Qe7 22. e6 Nxb4 23. axb4 Ba4 24. Qd2 Bxb3 25. Qxh6 Rf6 26. Bf7+ Kh8 27. Qh4 1-0 Stehno,P-Svoboda/Svetla nad Sazavou 1994) 9... Nd7 (9... Ne4!? 10. a3! (10. Qa4!? Qd7!? (10... Bd7? 11. a3) 11. e6! fxe6 12. Ne5 Qd6 13. Nxc6 bxc6 14. Bxc6+ Kf7 15. Bxa8 (15. a3!?) 15... Ba6+ 16. Kg1 Rxa8 17. Be3 and Black does not have sufficient compensation for the Exchange) 10... Ba5 11. Qa4 (11. Bxc6+ bxc6 12. Qa4 Bb6 13. Qxc6+ Qd7 14. Qxa8? O-O 15. Kg1 Ba6) 11... Qd7 12. e6 fxe6 13. Ne5 Qd6 14. Bxc6+ bxc6 15. Qxa5) 10. a3 Ba5 11. b4 Bb6 12. Nc3! Qe6 (12... O-O 13. Nxd5) 13. Ng5 Qg6 14. Bd3! f5 15. exf6 Qxf6 16. Nxd5 with a winning attack.

 

8... Ne4 9. cxd4 Bb6

9... Bb4 10. a3 Ba5 11. Qa4

 

10. Bxc6+?!

This is standard in these lines, but really unnecessary here, especially when the pawn at d5 is a potential target and the exchange at c6 helps to bolster Black's center. The best idea is to attack the d5 pawn directly and work up play on the dark squares long term, exploiting the fact that Black's dark-squared Bishop is completely out of play.

 

a) 10. Nc3! Be6 11. Re1 O-O!? (11... Nxc3 12. bxc3 gives White a great long-term edge due to his strong center, control of dark squares (a4 and Ba3 or Bg5 are in the offing), and excellent pieces.) 12. Nxe4 dxe4 13. Bxc6 bxc6 14. Rxe4 (14. Ng5!?) 14... Bd5 15. Rg4!? and Black's compensation for the pawn is insufficient.

 

b) 10. Qb3 Be6 11. Nc3 Rd8 12. Qa4 Qd7 13. Be3 O-O 14. Ne2 a6 15. Bxc6 Qxc6 16. Qxc6 bxc6 17. Rac1 Bd7 18. Ne1 Rfe8 19. Nd3 a5 20. h3 Rb8 21. f3 Nd6 22. b3 Nf5 23. Bf2 Re6 24. g4 Ne7 25. Kh2 f6 26. Nef4 fxe5 27. Nxe6 Bxe6 28. dxe5 Bc8 29. f4 Be6 30. Bh4 Ng6 31. Bg3 Bd7 32. Rc2 c5 33. f5 Ne7 34. e6 Bc8 1-0 Filgueira Fernandez,C-Vence Santorum,M/Padron 2001.

 

10... bxc6 11. Qc2 Qe6 12. Be3 Qg6 13. Nbd2

White can still fight for an edge with 13. Nh4! Qe6 14. f3 Nf6 15. a4! (15. Nf5?! O-O! 16. Qxc6!? Qxf5 17. Qxa8 Ba6 18. Qc6 Ng4!!) 15... a5 16. Nf5!? (safer is simply 16. Ra3! Nd7 17. f4) 16... O-O 17. Qxc6 Qxf5 18. Qxa8 and because of ...a5, Black does not have ... Ba6 -- but he still has some compensation for the Exchange with 18... Qd3 19. Re1 (19. Ra3 Qg6 20. exf6?? Bh3) 19... Bxd4 20. exf6 Bxe3+ 21. Kh1 but I don't see anything especially strong for Black here.

 

13... Nxd2 14. Qxg6??

White still has equality by 14. Qxd2 Bh3 15. Nh4 Qg4 16. f4 Qxh4 17. gxh3 Qxh3 18. Rac1=

 

14... Nxf3+ 15. gxf3 hxg6 16. Rac1 Bd7 17. b4 a5 18. bxa5 Rxa5 19. Rc2 O-O 20. Bd2 Ra4 21. Rb1 Bxd4 22. a3 Bf5 23. Bb4 Bxc2 24. Bxf8 Bxb1 0-1 [Max Sherer]


Line E: 6...d5 7.Bb5 Ne4 8.cxd4 Bb4+

If your opponent's don't fall into one of the traps above, they will most likely play this move (nine times out of ten according to Jude Acers, and that seems about right in my experience for opponents below 2000 rating). Patzer sees a check, patzer plays a check, of course. The reason the check is not as good as the retreat with 8...Bb6! is because White basically wants to trade his dark squared Bishop, while Black wants to retain his Bishop to fight for control of the key c5 square. Typically in this line, White gets his choice of playing against doubled pawns on the c-file or going for an attack on the kingside by f4-f5. His central control gives him both options.

Game Five

Adolf Anderssen - Daniel Harrwitz [C53]

Breslau m/Breslau (1) 1848


1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. d4 exd4 4. Bc4 Bc5 5. c3 Nf6 6. e5 d5 7. Bb5 Ne4 8. cxd4 Bb4+










9. Bd2 Bxd2+ 10. Nbxd2 O-O 11. Bxc6 bxc6

This is practically the standard position in the Steinitz-Sveshnikov Attack, reached in most of my games. White has the long term advantage of the doubled pawns on an open file, the better Knight to Black's bad light-squared Bishop, and potential play on the kingside via f4-f5 etc. I like White, even if Black is not without resources.

 

12. O-O f5 13. Rc1 Qe8 14. Qc2 Rb8 15. Nb3 Rb6 16. Nfd2!

Eliminating the last defender of the dark squares, especially c5, and leaving a Good Knight vs. Bad Bishop ending.

 

16... Qh5 17. f3 Nxd2

17... Ng5 18. Nc5 Ne6 19. Ndb3 f4 20. Nxe6 Bxe6 21. Nc5 Re8 22. Qd2 Qh4 23. b4

 

18. Qxd2 f4 19. Nc5 Qg6 20. Rfe1 Be6 21. Rc3! Qe8 22. Ra3 Bf5 23. b3!

23. Rxa7 Qb8 24. Ra6 Rxb2

 

23... a6 24. Rxa6 Rxa6 25. Nxa6 Qc8 26. Nc5 Be6 27. a4 g5 28. a5 Re8 29. a6 Qb8 30. Ra1 Qa7 31. Qb4 Kf7 32. Qb7 Qb6 33. a7 Qxb7 34. Nxb7 Ra8 35. Nd8+!? Ke7 36. Nxe6 Kxe6 37. b4










Black will eventually succumb to zugzwang or a kingside invasion by White's King. White plays Ra6 followed by either g3 or h4!? A great illustration of White's control of the dark squares and queenside ideas.

1-0

Game Six

Anyone who studies this line would do well to focus on the games of Evgeny Sveshnikov.

Evgeny Sveshnikov - Sergei Azarov [C53]

RUS-Cup/Minsk (7) 2000


1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. Bc4 Bc5 4. c3 Nf6 5. d4 exd4 6. e5 d5 7. Bb5 Ne4 8. cxd4 Bb4+ 9. Nbd2 O-O 10. O-O Bd7 11. Bd3 Bf5 12. Qc2 Bxd2 13. Bxd2 Bg6 14. Bc3 Qe7 15. Rae1 Nd8 16. g3 c5 17. Nh4 Nxc3 18. bxc3 cxd4 19. f4 Bxd3 20. Qxd3 dxc3 21. Qxc3 Ne6 22. Nf5 Qd8 23. Nd6 b5 24. Qc6 Rb8 25. Qxd5 Qb6+ 26. Kg2 Nd4 27. Re4 Ne6 28. Rc1 Rbd8 29. Rc6 Qa5 30. Re2 Qb4 31. Qxb5 Qa3 32. Qc4 Rb8 33. Nxf7

1-0


Game Seven

goeller - Moby-Dick [C53]

ICC 5 0 u/Internet Chess Club 2007


The following 5-minute game, while imperfect, illustrates several very interesting themes in the Giuoco Piano: transpositions to superior endings of Bad Bishop versus Knight; the "protect-take" trick that you have to watch out for; play on both the kingside and queenside due to White's control of the center; and how to build up a powerful kingside attack with the spearhead at e5.

1. e4 e5 2. Bc4 Bc5 3. Nf3 Nc6 4. c3 Nf6 5. d4 exd4 6. e5 d5 7. Bb5 Ne4 8. cxd4 Bb4+ 9. Bd2 Nxd2 10. Nbxd2 Bd7!?

This stops the doubled pawns, but the Bishop is passive here. White has to watch out, however, for the "protect-take" combo ...Nxe5!

11. O-O O-O 12. a3!

12. Bd3 Bg4=

12... Ba5

12... Bxd2 13. Bxc6 (13. Qxd2? Nxe5! is the protect-take) 13... Bxc6 14. Qxd2 The Knight is much better than the Bishop and White has prospects of a kingside attack via f4-f5 (the Knight can get out of the way via Ne1-d3 perhaps) or pressure on the c-file and the queenside pawns (Nc5 invites ...b6 weakening the c7 pawn).

13. Nb3! Bb6 14. Nc5!?

14. Bxc6 Bxc6 yields Black the two Bishops versus two Knights and therefore gives him some long-term chances, though the position is about balanced due to White's spatial superiority.

14... Bxc5

I had not sufficiently considered the protect-take again here, though White seems to emerge from the complications with a slight edge: 14... Nxe5! 15. Nxb7 Qb8! (15... Qc8 16. Bxd7 Nxd7 17. Nc5 Nxc5 18. dxc5 Bxc5 19. Qxd5) 16. Bxd7 (16. Ba6!?) 16... Nxd7 17. Nc5 Bxc5 (17... Nxc5 18. dxc5 Bxc5 19. Qxd5) 18. dxc5 Qxb2 19. Qxd5 Nf6 20. Qc6

15. dxc5?

15. Bxc6 Bxc6 16. dxc5 is a typical Good Knight versus Bad Bishop, where White's Knight goes to d4 and supports play on both the kingside and queenside.

15... Ne7?

Black misses his best chance for the protect-take combo: 15... Nxe5! 16. Bxd7 Nxf3+ (16... Nxd7? 17. Qxd5) 17. Qxf3 Qxd7 18. Rad1 c6

16. Bd3! Ng6

16... c6 17. Nd4! (17. Bxh7+?? Kxh7 18. Ng5+ Kg8 19. Qh5 Bf5) 17... Ng6 18. Qh5

17. h3?

17. Bxg6! hxg6 18. Qxd5 simply wins a pawn.

17... c6

17... Nf4 18. Qc2 Nxd3 19. Qxd3

18. Re1 Re8 19. Qc2 Qc7 20. Qc3 Re7 21. Re3 Rae8 22. Rae1 Nf8?!

Lets the pressure off of e5.

23. Ng5!? h6

23... Ng6? 24. Qd4 and Bxg6, Qh4

24. Nf3 Ne6 25. b4 Bc8 26. Bb1 Qd7 27. Qd3 g6

27... Nf8 28. Nd4

28. Nd4 Nxd4 29. Qxd4 Kh7 30. f4 Qe6 31. g4 Qd7 32. f5 Rg8?

This makes the thematic break even stronger.

32... Qc7 33. e6!

33. e6! fxe6

33... Qc7 34. exf7 Rxf7 35. fxg6+

34. fxg6+ Rxg6 35. Qf6 Reg7 36. Rxe6 Qxe6 37. Rxe6 Bxe6 38. Qxe6

Black resigns. The conclusion might go 38...h5 (the only way to stop Kh1! followed by h4-h5 winning a whole Rook) 39.g5! followed by h4, Bd3, and then King moves until Black is in total zugzwang.

1-0

Game Eight

goeller - Moby-Dick [C53]

ICC 5 0 u/Internet Chess Club 2007


1. e4 e5 2. Bc4 Bc5 3. Nf3 Nc6 4. c3 Nf6 5. d4 exd4 6. e5 d5 7. Bb5 Ne4 8. cxd4 Bb4+ 9. Bd2!

9. Nbd2 O-O 10. O-O (10. Bxc6?! Gufeld & Stetsko 10... bxc6 11. Qc2 c5! 12. dxc5 Ba6!) 10... Bxd2 11. Bxd2 Bg4 12. Be3=

9... Nxd2

9... Bxd2+ 10. Nbxd2 (10. Nfxd2!?) 10... O-O 11. Bxc6 bxc6 12. O-O Bg4 13. Qc2 c5 14. dxc5 Nxd2 15. Nxd2 Be2 16. Rfe1 d4 17. Nb3 d3 18. Qd2

10. Nbxd2 Bg4?!

10... O-O 11. O-O (11. Bxc6 bxc6 12. Qa4 c5!) 11... f6 12. Rc1 fxe5? 13. Bxc6 bxc6 14. Nxe5

11. Bxc6+! bxc6 12. Qa4 Bxd2+

12... Rb8! 13. Qxc6+ (13. O-O!?) 13... Qd7 (13... Bd7 14. Qxd5) 14. Qxd7+ Kxd7 15. O-O-O and Black has some compensation for the pawn due to the two Bishops.

13. Nxd2 Qd7

13... Bd7 14. O-O O-O (14... c5?! 15. Qa5) 15. Rac1 c5 16. Qa5

14. Nb3 O-O 15. O-O

15. Nc5! Qe8 16. O-O

15... f6

15... Be2!? 16. Rfe1 Bb5

16. Nc5 Qe8

16... Qf7 17. Qxc6 fxe5 18. dxe5 Rae8 19. Rae1

17. f4?!

17. e6! f5 18. f3 Bh5 19. Rae1 is even stronger.

17... fxe5 18. fxe5 Rxf1+?!

18... Qg6! gives Black more counterplay than he would have without the exchange of center pawns.

19. Rxf1 a5

19... Qg6 20. Qa6

20. e6! Rb8 21. Qxa5

21. Nd7! Rxb2 22. Rf8+ (22. Qxc6!)

21... Rxb2 22. Qxc7

22. e7! Qxe7? (22... Rb8 23. Rf8+) 23. Qa8+

22... Rxa2 23. e7 Re2 24. Rf8+ Qxf8 25. exf8=Q+ Kxf8 26. Qf4+

Black resigns

1-0

Game Nine

William Steinitz - Emanuel Lasker [C53]

World Championship 05th/USA/CAN (4) 1894


1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. Bc4 Bc5 4. c3 Nf6 5. d4 exd4 6. e5 d5 7. Bb5 Ne4 8. cxd4 Be7 9. Nc3 O-O 10. Bd3 f5 11. exf6 Nxf6 12. Be3 Nb4 13. Bb1 Ng4 14. a3 Nxe3 15. fxe3 Bh4+ 16. g3 Bg4 17. O-O Qe8 18. axb4 Qh5 19. Nxd5 Rxf3 20. Nf4 Rxf4 21. Qb3+ Rf7 22. Rxf7 Qxf7 23. Ba2 Qxb3 24. Bxb3+ Kf8 25. gxh4 Ke7 26. Bd5 c6 27. Be4 a6 28. Ra5 h6 29. b5 cxb5 30. Bxb7 Ra7 31. Bc6 Bd7 32. Bxd7 Kxd7 33. Kf2 Kc6 34. Ke2 Kb6 35. Ra1 a5 36. Kd3 a4 37. e4 Rf7 38. e5 Rf3+ 39. Ke4 Rf2 40. Rb1 Kc6 41. d5+ Kd7 42. Kd4 Rd2+ 43. Kc5 Rc2+ 44. Kxb5 Re2 45. e6+ Kd6 46. Rd1 Rxb2+ 47. Kxa4 Rxh2 48. Re1 Ra2+ 49. Kb5 Ra8 50. Kc4 g5 51. hxg5 hxg5 52. Kd4 Ra4+ 53. Kd3 Ra3+ 54. Ke4 g4 55. Kf4 Ra8 56. e7 Re8 57. Kf5 g3 58. Kf6 Kd7 59. d6 g2 60. Rg1 1-0


Line F: 6...d5 7.Bb5 Ne4 8.cxd4 Bb6!

This is the best line and equal with best play. But the first game by Ni Hua shows that White is not without chances of getting an interesting attack going!

Game Ten

Ni Hua (2641) - Mihail Marin (2551) [C53]

50th It/Reggio Emilia ITA (9) 2008


1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. Bc4 Bc5 4. c3 Nf6 5. d4 exd4 6. e5 d5 7. Bb5 Ne4 8. cxd4 Bb6

 










9. Nc3 O-O 10. Be3 Bg4 11. Qc2!

11. Bxc6?! bxc6 12. Qa4 Bd7 Marin(12... f6!? 13. Qxc6 Nxc3 14. bxc3 Bxf3 15. gxf3 fxe5 16. dxe5 Bxe3 17. fxe3 Rxf3 18. O-O-O Rxe3)

 

11... Bxf3?!

This move seems a little dangerous, opening up lines on Black's king. But this is exactly what Marin had recommended in Beating the Open Games.

 

12. gxf3 Ng5 13. Bxc6! bxc6 14. O-O-O!

This is the way to play against 8...Bb6: develop, castle queenside, and throw everything into the attack on the Black king!

14. Qf5 Ne6 15. O-O-O Qe7! (15... Qh4 16. f4) 16. f4 f6 Marin.

 

14... Nxf3 15. Qe2!

Sveshnikov had analyzed 15. Qf5 Nh4 16. Qg4 Ng6 17. h4 f5 18. exf6 Qxf6 19. h5 Nf4 20. Rh4

 

15... Nh4 16. Rhg1 f6 17. Qh5 Ng6 18. Rg3 fxe5?!

18... Re8! 19. f4 fxe5 20. fxe5 (20. Rh3 exf4 21. Qxh7+ Kf7) 20... Qh4 21. Qf5 Qe7 (21... Qxh2? 22. Rh3 Qg2 23. Rd2) (21... Rf8 22. Qe6+) 22. h4

 

19. Rh3! Qf6?

19... Kf7 20. dxe5! (20. Qxh7 Rh8 21. Rf3+ Nf4 22. Qc2)

 

20. Rg1! exd4 21. Qxh7+ Kf7 22. Rxg6 Qxg6 23. Rf3+ Qf6 24. Rxf6+ Kxf6 25. Qh4+ Ke5 26. Qe7+ Kf5 27. Qd7+ Kg6 28. Bxd4 Bxd4 29. Qg4+ Kh7 30. Qxd4 Rf6 31. Nd1 a6 32. Ne3 Re8 33. Ng4 Rfe6 34. Qd3+ Kh8 35. Qxa6 c5 36. Qd3 c4 37. Qh3+ Kg8 38. Ne3 c6 39. Qg4 Rf6 40. Qd7 Re4 41. Nf5 Rf7 42. Qd8+

A brilliant game by Chinese GM Ni Hua against the well known 1.e4 e5 theorist.

1-0

Game Eleven

Ni Hua (2641) - D. Navara (2656) [C53]

50th It/Reggio Emilia ITA (1) 2007


1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. Bc4 Bc5 4. c3 Nf6 5. d4 exd4 6. e5 d5 7. Bb5 Ne4 8. cxd4 Bb6 9. Nc3 O-O 10. Be3 Bg4 11. Qc2 Bf5 12. Qb3 Ne7 13. Be2 c6 14. O-O f6 15. exf6 Rxf6 16. Ne5 Ng6 17. Na4 Nxe5 18. Nxb6

18. dxe5 Re6 19. Nxb6 axb6 20. Bxb6 Qe7 21. Rfe1 (21. f4? Nd2) 21... Rxe5=

18... axb6 19. dxe5 Rg6!? 20. Bh5

20. Qxb6? Qxb6 21. Bxb6 Bh3 22. Bf3 Nd2

20... Re6 21. f3 Nc5 22. Bxc5 bxc5 23. Qxb7 g6 24. Bg4 Bxg4?!

24... Rb8 25. Qa7 Rxe5=

25. fxg4 Qe8 26. Rf7! Qxf7 27. Qxa8+ Qe8 28. Qxe8+ Rxe8 29. Kf2

29. Re1 Kf7 30. Kf2 Ke6=

29... Rxe5 30. a4 Re7 31. b3 Rb7 32. Rc1 Rxb3 33. Rxc5 Rb6 34. Ra5 Kf7 35. Ra7+ Ke6 36. Rxh7 c5 37. h4 Rb4 38. a5 Rxg4 39. a6 Ra4 40. a7 Kf5 41. h5 gxh5 42. Rxh5+ Ke6 43. Rh6+ Ke5 44. Rh5+ Ke6 1/2-1/2


Game Twelve

William Steinitz - Emanuel Lasker [C53]

World Championship 05th/USA/CAN (6) 1894


1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. Bc4 Bc5 4. c3 Nf6 5. d4 exd4 6. e5 d5 7. Bb5 Ne4 8. cxd4 Bb6 9. Nc3 O-O 10. Be3 f5 11. exf6 Nxf6 12. Rc1 Qd6 13. O-O Bg4 14. Be2 Rae8 15. h3 Bxf3 16. Bxf3 Ne7 17. Ne2 Ng6 18. g3 c6 19. Bg2 Ne4 20. Qb3 Qf6 21. a4 Nd6 22. Qb4 Nc4 23. Rxc4 dxc4 24. a5 Bd8 25. Qxb7 Bxa5 26. Qxa7 Bd2 27. Qc5 Bxe3 28. fxe3 Qe6 29. Rxf8+ Rxf8 30. e4 Qf7 31. Kh2 Rb8 32. Qxc6 Ne7 33. Qc7 Rxb2 34. Nf4 g5 35. Nd5 Nxd5 36. Qd8+ Kg7 37. Qxg5+ Kh8 38. exd5 Re2 39. Qd8+ Re8 40. Qg5 Qg7 41. Qd2 Qf6 42. Qc3 Rc8 43. Bf3 Rb8 44. Bg2 Rc8 45. h4 Qd6 46. Bh3 Rc7 47. Be6 Qf8 48. Kg2 Qf6 49. Qa5 Re7 50. Qc5 Re8 51. Qxc4 Rf8 52. Qe2 Qxd4 53. d6 Rd8 54. d7 Rxd7 55. Bxd7 Qxd7 56. Qe5+ Kg8 57. h5 Qg7 58. Qe8+ Qf8 59. Qxf8+ Kxf8 60. Kf3 Kf7 61. Kg4 Kg7 62. Kg5 Kf7 63. Kh6 Kg8 64. Kg5 Kf7 65. Kf4 Kg7 66. Kf5 Kf7 67. g4 h6 68. Ke5 Ke7 69. Kd5 Kf6 70. Ke4 Ke6 71. Kd4 Kf6 1/2-1/2


Game Thirteen

Steinitz - Carl Schlechter [C53]

Vienna (0) 1898


1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. Bc4 Bc5 4. c3 Nf6 5. d4 exd4 6. e5 d5 7. Bb5 Ne4 8. cxd4 Bb6 9. Nc3 O-O 10. Be3 f6 11. Qb3 Nxc3 12. bxc3 Ne7 13. O-O c6 14. Bd3 Bg4 15. exf6 Rxf6 16. Ne5 Bf5 17. Bxf5 Rxf5 18. Rae1 Qd6 19. Bc1 Ng6 20. Ba3 Qf6 21. Nxg6 Qxg6 22. Re7 Rf7 23. Re2 Bc7 24. Rfe1 h6 25. g3 Bd6 26. Re8+ Rxe8 27. Rxe8+ Kh7 28. Bxd6 Qxd6 29. Qc2+ g6 30. Qe2 Qf6 31. Kg2 g5 32. Re6 Qf5 33. g4 Qb1 34. f3 a5 35. a4 Rg7 36. Rf6 h5 37. Qe6 Qc2+ 38. Kg3 1-0


Game Fourteen

Sveshnikov (2507) - K Jedryczka (2321) [C53]

5th Amplico AIG Life/Warsaw POL (3) 2005


1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. Bc4 Bc5 4. c3 Nf6 5. d4 exd4 6. e5 d5 7. Bb5 Ne4 8. cxd4 Bb6 9. Nc3 Bg4 10. Be3 O-O 11. Bxc6 bxc6 12. h3 Bh5 13. O-O f5 14. Qc1 Bxf3 15. gxf3 Nxc3 16. Qxc3 f4 17. Bd2 Qd7 18. Kh2 Rae8 19. Rg1 Re6 20. Rg4 Rh6 21. Rag1 Rf7 22. b4 Rf5 23. a4 Rfh5 24. Rxg7+ Qxg7 25. Rxg7+ Kxg7 26. Bxf4 Rxh3+ 27. Kg2 R6h4 28. Qxc6 Bxd4 29. Bg3 Rh6 30. Qxd5 Ba1 31. Qd7+ Kg8 32. e6 1-0


Game Fifteen

Sveshnikov (2512) - L Mazi (2401) [C53]

TCh-SLO/Celje SLO (9) 2004


1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. Bc4 Bc5 4. c3 Nf6 5. d4 exd4 6. e5 d5 7. Bb5 Ne4 8. cxd4 Bb6 9. Nc3 O-O 10. Be3 f6 11. exf6 Nxf6 12. Bxc6 bxc6 13. Ne5 Qd6 14. O-O Be6 15. Rc1 Nd7 16. Nxd7 Bxd7 17. Ne2 Rae8 18. Qd2 a5 19. Nc3 Rf5 20. Na4 Ref8 21. Nc5 Rh5 22. f4 Bf5 23. Rf3 Qf6 24. h3 Be4 25. Rg3 Re8 26. Nd7 Qd6 27. Ne5 Rh6 28. Bf2 Rf6 29. Rgc3 Qb4 30. a3 Qb5 31. b3 Ref8 32. Be3 Rd6 33. Kh2 Rff6 34. Bf2 Rfe6 35. g4 h5 36. f5 Re8 37. Nxc6 hxg4 38. a4 g3+ 39. Bxg3 Qa6 40. Bxd6 cxd6 41. Re1 Qb7 42. Qg5 Qf7 43. Rg3 Kf8 44. b4 axb4 45. a5 Bc7 46. a6 Bb6 47. a7 Rc8 48. f6 g6 49. Qh6+ Ke8 50. Qh8+ Kd7 51. Qxc8+ Kxc8 52. a8=Q+ Kc7 53. Rc1 Qxf6 54. Ne5+ Bc5 55. Qc6+ 1-0


Game Sixteen

Sveshnikov - Rustem Dautov [C53]

URS-ch otbor/Pinsk (0) 1986


1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. Bc4 Bc5 4. c3 Nf6 5. d4 exd4 6. e5 d5 7. Bb5 Ne4 8. cxd4 Bb6 9. Nc3 O-O 10. Bxc6 bxc6 11. Be3 Bg4 12. Qa4 c5 13. dxc5 Bxf3 14. gxf3 Nxc5 15. Bxc5 Bxc5 16. O-O-O Qe8 17. Qa5 Bxf2 18. Qxd5 Qe6 19. Kb1 Rac8 20. Rhf1 Bb6 21. f4 Qf5+ 22. Ka1 h6 23. Ne4 Kh7 24. Ng3 Qg4 25. a3 Qh3 26. Qe4+ Kh8 27. f5 c6 28. f6 g6 29. Rf4 Rcd8 30. Rd6 Qxh2 31. Rh4 Qg1+ 32. Ka2 Qe3 33. Qh1 Kh7 34. Ne4 Rh8 35. Rxc6 h5 36. e6 Kh6 37. Rc3 Qe2 38. e7 Rd1 39. Qh2 Qxh2 40. Rxh2 Re1 41. Nd6 Rb8 42. Nxf7+ Kh7 43. Rc6 Bd4 44. Ng5+ 1-0


Game Seventeen

Steinitz - Harry Nelson Pillsbury [C53]

Vienna 1898


1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. Bc4 Bc5 4. c3 Nf6 5. d4 exd4 6. e5 d5 7. Bb5 Ne4 8. cxd4 Bb6 9. Nc3 O-O 10. Be3 Ne7 11. Bd3 f5 12. exf6 Nxf6 13. Ne5 Nf5 14. Bxf5 Bxf5 15. g4 Be4 16. O-O Nd7 17. Nxe4 Nxe5 18. Ng5 h6 19. Ne6 Nf3+ 20. Qxf3 Rxf3 21. Nxd8 Rxd8 22. b4 Re8 23. Kg2 Rf6 24. Rfd1 Re4 25. Kg3 Rc6 26. Rac1 Rxc1 27. Rxc1 Bxd4 28. Bxd4 Rxd4 29. Rxc7 Rxb4 30. h4 a6 31. Rd7 d4 32. Kf4 d3+ 33. Kf5 Rb2 34. Kg6 Rb6+ 35. Kh5 Rf6 36. Rxd3 Rxf2 37. g5 hxg5 38. hxg5 Re2 39. Rd7 b5 40. g6 Kf8 41. Rf7+ Ke8 42. Rxg7 Kf8 43. Ra7 Rxa2 44. g7+ Kg8 45. Kg6 Rg2+ 46. Kh6 1/2-1/2

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Copyright © 2008 by Michael Goeller

Urusov Gambit System

Two Knights Modern

Notes on the Two Knights Modern with d4