Michael Goeller - Dale Brandreth [B10]

US Amateur Team East/Parsippany, NJ USA (1) 2009


1. e4 c6 2. Nc3 d5 3. Nf3

The Two Knights Variation seems a natural fit for my repertoire, given that I also play the Tango as Black (1.d4 Nf6 2.c4 Nc6 3. Nc3 e5 etc.)

 

3... d4

This is a move that I have not given much thought, mostly because it so much resembles the Tango.

 

4. Ne2 c5

Not 4... d3?! 5. cxd3 Qxd3?! 6. Nc3 Qd8 7. d4

 

5. Ng3

Perhaps 5. c3!? dxc3 (5... d3?! 6. Nf4 c4?! 7. Qa4+) 6. bxc3 Nc6 7. Ng3 g6 8. Bb5 Bd7 9. O-O Bg7 10. d4 cxd4 11. cxd4 a6 (11... Nxd4 12. Nxd4 Bxb5 13. Nxb5 Bxa1 14. Bf4) 12. Bc4

 

5... Nc6 6. Bc4

6. Bb5 Qb6 7. a4 a6 8. Bxc6+ Qxc6 9. d3 is very Tango-like.

 

6... Nf6!

 

 

Black prepares ...Bg4. After my experience in this game, I have to consider this one of the most critical tests of the whole variation.

a) 6... Bg4? was the continuation in the only three games I have played on ICC to reach this position, when White has of course 7. Bxf7+! Kxf7 8. Ng5+

b) 6... e5?! is all you'll find mentioned in the books, when White gets a good reversed Tango with 7. d3 Be7 (7... Be6!?) 8. O-O Nf6 and now all of the books cite a famous game by Keres as sufficient evidence: 9. Nh4! (9. Ng5 O-O 10. f4 h6 11. Nf3 exf4 12. Bxf4 Na5 13. Qd2 Nxc4 14. dxc4 Be6 15. b3 Nh7 16. Rae1 g5! 17. h4? gxf4 18. Qxf4 Kh8 19. Nh5 Rg8 20. Qxh6 Bxh4 21. Qf4 Bxe1 22. Qe5+ f6 23. Qxe6 Bg3 24. e5 Qc8 25. Qd5 Qg4 26. Nxg3 Qxg3 27. Rf2 Ng5 28. Nxg5 Rxg5 29. Rxf6 Qe1+ 30. Rf1 Qe3+ 0-1 Bogoljubow,E-Tartakower,S/Vienna 1922) 9... O-O (9... Nxe4 10. Nxe4 Bxh4 11. Qh5!) 10. a4!? (10. Nhf5!) 10... Nxe4 11. Nxe4 Bxh4 12. f4 exf4 13. Bxf4 Be7 14. Qh5 Be6 15. Rf3 Qd7 (15... Bxc4 16. Rh3 h6 17. Rg3! e.g.: 17... Bh4 18. Rxg7+!! Kxg7 19. Bxh6+ Kg8 20. Qg4+ Bg5 21. Bxg5 f5 22. Qg3 f4 23. Bxf4+ Kh8 24. Qh3+) 16. Rg3 Kh8 17. Rf1 f6 18. Rff3 (18. Nxc5) 18... g5 19. Rh3 Bf5 20. g4! Bxe4 21. dxe4 Bd8 22. Bd6 Bc7 23. Be6 Qg7 24. Bxf8 Rxf8 25. Bf5 Rf7 26. Bxh7 Re7 27. e5 Nxe5 28. Be4+ Kg8 29. Bd5+ Nf7 30. Bxb7 Bxh2+ 31. Rxh2 Rxb7 32. Re2 Kf8 33. Rf5 Qh6 34. Qxh6+ Nxh6 35. Rxf6+ Kg7 36. Rc6 Nxg4 37. Rxc5 Kf6 38. Re4 Ne3 39. b3 Rd7 40. Kf2 Kg6 41. Re8 Rf7+ 42. Ke2 Nf5 43. Re6+ Kh5 44. Kd3 Kg4 45. b4 Kf4 46. Re4+ Kf3 47. Re1 Kf4 48. Rf1+ Kg4 49. b5 Rf6 50. a5 1-0 Keres,P-Tartakower,S/Paris 1954.

 

7. O-O

a) 7. e5!? Nd5 8. O-O Bg4 9. Re1 e6=

b) 7. h3!? may actually be the best move, when you basically have a position from the Tango with colors reversed and the extra move h3 for White.

 

7... Bg4 8. h3

8. c3 Qd7 9. cxd4 Bxf3 10. Qxf3 Nxd4 11. Qd1 e6 12. a4 Be7 13. f4 O-O 14. d3 Rad8 15. Kh1 Nc6 16. Bd2 Ne8 17. Bc3 Bf6 18. e5 Bh4 19. Ne4 Be7 20. Rf3 Nd4 21. Rh3 g6 22. Be1 f5 23. exf6 Nxf6 24. Ng5 Nh5 25. Bd2 Bxg5 26. fxg5 Nf4 27. Rh4 Nd5 28. Qg1 Rf7 29. Re4 Rdf8 30. Bc3 Rf4 31. Bxd4 cxd4 32. Rxd4 Qf7 33. Bxd5 exd5 34. Rxf4 Qxf4 35. h3 d4 36. Re1 Qd2 37. Re4 Qxb2 38. Qxd4 Qc1+ 39. Kh2 Qc7+ 40. Qe5 Qxe5+ 41. Rxe5 Rf4 42. Re8+ Kf7 43. Rb8 Rxa4 44. Rxb7+ Kg8 45. Rd7 a5 46. Kg3 Ra1 47. Kf2 a4 48. Ra7 a3 49. d4 a2 50. Kg3 Kf8 51. d5 Ke8 52. d6 Kd8 53. Kh2 Kc8 54. h4 Kd8 55. g4 Ke8 56. h5 Rd1 57. Rxa2 Rxd6 58. Ra7 Rd7 59. Ra6 Kf7 1/2-1/2 König,I-Napolitano,M/Warsaw olympiad 1935.

 

8... Bxf3 9. Qxf3 Ne5

a) 9... a6!?

b) 9... e5?! is, of course, all wrong: 10. d3 g6 11. Qe2 Bd6 12. f4 Nd7? 13. Bxf7+! Kxf7 14. fxe5+ Kg7 15. exd6 Qh4 16. Qf2 Qf6 17. Qd2 Qh4 18. Qe1 Kg8 19. Rf4 Qh6 20. e5 Ncxe5 21. Qe4 Qg7 22. Qd5+ Nf7 23. Bd2 Rd8 24. Ne4 h6 25. Raf1 Rf8 26. Qe6 g5 27. R4f2 1-0 Rogmann,G-Dyckmanns/Krefeld 1938.

 

10. Bb5+ Nfd7

At this point, I went into a long think trying to find something for White -- without much luck. I decided to at least retain the two Bishops, even if that meant going into a temporary retreat.

 

11. Qd1!?

a) 11. Qh5 is the move I most considered and perhaps should have played, but Black seems ok after 11... a6 (11... Qb6!? 12. a4 a6 13. Bxd7+ Nxd7 14. d3) 12. f4!? (12. Bxd7+! Nxd7 13. d3 g6 14. Qe2 Bg7 15. f4 is at least better than the game continuation.) 12... axb5 13. fxe5 g6 14. e6! (14. Qg5 e6! xe5) 14... fxe6 (14... gxh5?? 15. exf7#) 15. Qg4 Ne5! (15... Qb6!? 16. Qf4 O-O-O 17. a4) 16. Qxe6 Qd6 17. Qb3!? (17. Qxd6 exd6 18. d3 b4!? 19. Bf4 Bg7) 17... Qc6

b) 11. Qb3!? a6 12. Be2 b5 13. d3 e6 14. c4! (14. a4!?) 14... Rb8 15. cxb5 axb5 16. Qd1 and the Bishop and Queen arrive, by a circuitous route, to the same position as in the game but with some slight positional gains on the queenside.

 

11... a6 12. Be2 e6!?

The main drawback to my line is that it allows 12... d3! 13. cxd3 Nc6! 14. f4 e5! and I like Black. So perhaps 11.Qh5 is best after all.

 

13. f4!?

I wanted to get that Knight out of there, but this does give Black one more chance for the d3 idea.

13. d3!

 

13... Nc6

13... Qh4!? 14. Kh2 d3 15. cxd3 Nc6

 

14. d3 Qc7

14... Qh4!? 15. Kh2!? O-O-O 16. c4

 

15. c4 Be7 16. Bd2 Rg8!

I really admired this move when my opponent played it. Now ...g5 has added weight.

16... g5!? 17. Nh5! Rg8 (17... O-O-O 18. fxg5) 18. f5 O-O-O 19. Bg4

 

17. e5

 










17... g6?

It seems accurate to give this a full question mark, since this slight wavering really determined the outcome of the game. If Black had chosen this moment to strike, then the remaining conversation would have been held on the Kingside, with my monarch in jeopardy for the remainder. Instead, I get the breathing room I need to turn the focus to the queenside and the Black King.

17... g5! 18. f5! (18. Bf3!?) 18... Ndxe5! (18... Qxe5? 19. fxe6! fxe6 20. Bh5+) (18... exf5 19. Nxf5 Ndxe5 20. Bg4!) (18... O-O-O 19. Bg4) 19. fxe6 fxe6 20. Bh5+ Kd7!

 

18. Ne4! O-O-O 19. a3 Rdf8?!










Too slow.

a) 19... f6? 20. exf6 Nxf6 (20... Bxf6 21. b4!) 21. Ng5

b) 19... g5! seems required of the position.

 

20. b4!

Now White turns the corner and gets the attack going first. From this point onward, Black is on the defensive. Too slow is 20. Rb1?! g5! 21. fxg5 (21. f5 Qxe5 22. Bg4 h5!) 21... Ncxe5 22. b4 h6! 23. gxh6 cxb4 24. axb4 f5 25. Nc5!

 

20... cxb4

20... g5!? 21. b5 Ncb8!? might be tried.

 

21. axb4 Nxb4 22. c5!?

22. Qb3 Nc6 23. Rfb1 Nc5! (23... g5?! 24. Nd6+!) 24. Nxc5 Bxc5 25. Bf3 f6 may hold.

 

22... Nc6

Black may have better tries, but white attacks in any case:

a) 22... Bxc5? 23. Nxc5 Nxc5 (23... Qxc5?? 24. Rc1) 24. Bxb4

b) 22... Nd5!? 23. Bf3 (23. c6!? Qxc6 24. Rc1 Nc5 25. Bf3) 23... Nxc5 24. Nxc5 Bxc5 25. Bxd5 exd5 26. Qb3

c) 22... Nxc5 23. Bxb4!! (I figured 23. Nxc5!? Bxc5 24. Bf3) 23... Nxe4 24. Bxe7 Nc3 25. Bxf8!! Nxd1 26. Rfxd1

 

23. Nd6+! Kb8

a) 23... Kd8! 24. Qc2 Bxd6 25. exd6 Qc8 and Black is still surviving

b) 23... Bxd6?! 24. cxd6 Qb8 25. Bf3

 

24. Qc2 f6

24... Nd8 25. Rfc1

 

25. Rfb1 Nd8

 










26. Rxa6!

If you ask Fritz, White is spoiled for choice here. But you have to be able to calculate like a machine to see it all. If you let Fritz think for a while, though, he thinks my move is best.

26. Ba5!? was my original intention, but just as I was about to play it I saw 26... Qxc5 27. Bxd8!! Bxd6! and then I spent way too much time trying in my head to make this work before choosing the simpler option in the game. Of course, Fritz quickly sees(all I had seen going into this was the lovely 27... Qxc2?? 28. Rxb7+ Ka8 29. Rxa6#) 28. Qa4! Rxd8 (28... Kc8 29. Rxb7!!) (28... Qa7 29. Qc6!!) 29. Qxa6 Qc1+!? 30. Bf1! Qe3+ 31. Kh1 Nc5 32. Qa7+ Kc7 33. Qb6+ Kd7 34. Qxd6+ Ke8 35. Qxc5

 

26... Qxc5

26... Nxc5 27. Ba5! Nxa6 28. Bxc7+ Nxc7 29. Nxb7!! Nxb7 30. Qc6

 

27. Qa4! Bxd6 28. exd6

Black resigned. I had just under five minutes left on my clock, so I was relieved not to have to prove the rest. Funny how my two Bishops, which I had seen as my positional trump throughout, stood idly by the entire game....

 

1-0

[Michael Goeller]


Michael Goeller (2050) - Bill Potts (1850) [B09]

US Amateur Team East/Parsippany, NJ USA (3) 2009


1. e4 g6 2. d4 Bg7 3. Nc3 d6 4. f4 Nf6 5. a3

I was inspired to start playing this move after seeing games with the even more straightforward idea 5. e5 dxe5 6. dxe5 Qxd1+ 7. Kxd1 Ng4 8. Ke1 and White typically goes on to put Black under tremendous restraint.

 

5... O-O

The Left Wing Austrian Attack, the chief point of which is to discourage 5... c5?! due to 6. dxc5 Qa5 7. b4!

 

6. Nf3 c5!?

This is probably playable, but better, in my opinion, is 6... b6! with the idea of enforcing the ...c5 break.

 

7. dxc5 dxc5?!

This move, however, is just too passive. Better 7... Qa5 8. b4 Qd8 (8... Qc7 9. e5!) 9. Rb1 Nfd7 10. Na4

 

8. Qxd8!

After the exchange of Queens and the advance of the e-pawn, White gains a comfortable advantage and never even has to move his King. The inferior 8. Be3 Qb6 is analyzed by Lalic and Okhotnik, but Black seems fine to me.

 

8... Rxd8 9. e5

 










"The Austrian Wedge"

 

9... Ne8

9... Nd5 10. Nxd5 Rxd5 11. Be3 (11. Bc4!? Rd8 12. Be3) 11... b6 12. Bd3 Bb7 13. O-O-O Nc6 14. Be4 Rxd1+ 15. Rxd1 Rd8 16. b4 Glek - Heck, Willingen 2001, is given by Nigel Davies in "Gambiteer I" and by James Vigus in "The Pirc in Black and White."

 

10. Be3 b6 11. Bc4!?

Fritz likes this move, too, but probably better is Bd3, e.g.:

11. Bd3 Bb7 12. O-O (12. O-O-O!?) 12... Nc6 13. Be4 e6 14. Rad1 Rxd1 15. Rxd1 Rd8 16. Rxd8 Nxd8 17. Bxb7 Nxb7 18. Ne4 Madan - Grunberg, Baile Tusnad 2005 is given by Davies.

 

11... Nc7

During the game, I was intrigued by lines like 11... Bb7 12. Ng5!? e6 13. Nge4 (13. Kf2 Nc6 14. Nge4 Nd4) 13... Nc6 14. h4 h5 (14... Nd4 15. O-O-O) 15. Rg1 Ne7 16. g4 Nd5 17. Kf2

 

12. Ng5 e6

During the game, I assumed he intended 12... Be6 13. Nxe6 fxe6 (13... Nxe6? 14. Bd5) 14. Kf2 but with the two Bishops and a space and structual advantage, this looks winning. Notice that the Bishop at g7 will never get into the game now.

 

13. Kf2 Ba6 14. Bxa6 Nbxa6 15. Nce4!?

Now White's c-pawn can advance to cover the d4 or d5 squares as necessary to keep Black under restraint.

 

15... h6 16. Nf3 Ne8 17. Rhd1 Nac7

17... f6 or 17... f5! seems necessary if Black is to get any counterplay.

 

18. c4 Bf8?! 19. Ke2

I decided to just use my advantage to sit on the position and slowly improve, hoping Black would crack. There were more vigorous ideas in 19. g4! or 19. Rxd8! Rxd8 20. b4 cxb4 21. axb4 Bxb4 22. Rxa7

 

19... Kg7 20. g4 f5

On 20... f6 I had intended 21. g5!? (21. exf6+ is also good, of course) 21... hxg5 (21... f5 22. gxh6+ Kxh6 23. Neg5 Kg7 24. b4) (21... fxg5 22. fxg5 h5 23. b4) 22. exf6+ Nxf6 23. Nexg5 with ideas like b4.

 

21. gxf5!?

This move seemed to create more opportunities for attack.

21. exf6+ Nxf6 22. Nxf6 Kxf6 23. Ne5 (23. Bf2!?)

 

21... exf5

21... gxf5 22. Nf2 Kf7 23. Nd3

 

22. Nc3 Ne6 23. Nd5 Kf7 24. Rg1

More precise might have been 24. Nh4 Bg7 (24... b5!? 25. cxb5 Rab8 26. a4 Rb7 27. Nc3) 25. Rg1 (25. a4!? Rac8 26. Rg1 Nf8 27. Rg3 Rc6 28. Rag1 a6 29. b3) 25... b5 26. b3 Rab8 27. Ra2 winning a pawn.

 

24... N8c7

During the game, I feared 24... b5! 25. b3 bxc4 26. bxc4 Rab8 27. Ra2! N8c7 28. Rd2

 

25. Nxc7 Nxc7 26. Nh4

White finally cashes in, winning at least a pawn.

 

26... Ne6 27. Rxg6! Nd4+? 28. Bxd4 Rxd4 29. Rf6+ Ke8

29... Kg8? 30. Rg1+ Kh7 31. Rf7+ Kh8 32. Ng6+ Kg8 33. Rxf5

 

30. Nxf5 Rd7 31. Rg1

31. e6!

 

31... Rad8?

 










31... Rf7 32. Rgg6

 

32. Rg8

32. e6! is most deadly says Fritz

 

32... Rd2+

32... Rf7 33. Nd6+ Rxd6 34. Rxf7! Kxf7 35. Rxf8+ Kxf8 36. exd6 Ke8 37. Kf3

 

33. Kf3 R8d3+ 34. Ke4! Rb3 35. Rfxf8+ Kd7

and Black resigned, as White has mate in two.

1-0

[Michael Goeller]

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