A Black Fianchetto System in the Open Games

Part Two: White Plays a Gambit with d4 and c3

By Michael Goeller

We continue our series on the universal Black Fianchetto System in the Open Games by looking at lines where White gambits a pawn with d4 followed by c3. This is the natural follow-up to looking at lines where White plays c3 followed by d4 to build a classical center, and some of the variations (especially those where Black declines the gambit with Nge7 followed by d5) can come about by either move order.

The material is divided into three sections:

In Section One, we look at games where Black accepts the pawn sacrifice, for example after 1.e4 e5 2.Nf3 Nc6 3.Bc4 (or 3.Bb5) 3...g6 4.d4 exd4 5.c3 dxc3 6.Nxc3. White gains time for development and gets a nice square for his Knight at c3. Black gets an extra pawn and appears to hold onto it with careful play. For those who don't like to hand their opponent's the initiative even for a pawn, we also consider two ways of declining the gambit. In Section Two we look at declining the gambit by "pushing past" with ...d3, for example after 1.e4 e5 2.Nf3 Nc6 3.d4 exd4 4.c3 d3. Black loses a tempo to return the pawn, but he prevents White's natural development and keeps the character of the game relatively closed, so that he has time to achieve his favored set-up. This system is not treated by theory, so it has some surprise value and puts both players on their own devices, which makes it an ideal short-cut system. However, White does get more space and a slight edge. For those seeking a more active way of declining the pawn, Section Three provides a repertoire built around ....Nge7, which is practically a system in itself and can be used against many White openings, including the Danish Gambit (1.e4 e5 2.d4 exd4 3.c3 Ne7!? -- called the Svenonius Variation), the Goring Gambit (1.e4 e5 2.Nf3 Nc6 3.d4 exd4 4.c3 Nge7!?), the Ponziani (1.e4 e5 2.Nf3 Nc6 3.c3 Nge7!?), the Italian Gambit (1.e4 e5 2.Nf3 Nc6 3.Bc4 g6 4.d4 exd4 5.c3 Nge7!?), and the Ruy Lopez (1.e4 e5 2.Nf3 Nc6 3.Bb5 g6 4.d4 exd4 5.c3 Nge7!? or by various transpositions, including 4.c3 Nge7 etc.) Black does not always play a kingside fianchetto in the ...Nge7 lines, but he often does, so this makes a natural addition to the repertoire.

Section One: Black Accepts the Gambit with ...dxc3

It is often said that "the only way to refute a gambit is to accept it," and in this section we look at games where Black accepts the d4 and c3 gambit with ....exd4 followed by ....dxc3. Black does have to defend well and look for opportunities to gain activity (sometimes by returning the pawn). Mostly, though, Black carefully anticipates his opponent's threats while exchanging pieces, hoping to reach an ending where his extra pawn can tell. Though I think the analysis shows that Black does quite well by accepting the gambit, I also know that this mode of defensive play is not for everyone. That's why there are two additional sections covering different modes of declining the gambit.

Game 1: Italian Game

Mads Reinert (2330) - Jorgen Hvenekilde (2280) [C50]

Allerod 50 Jubilee/Allerod (4) 1984


1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. Bc4 g6 4. d4 exd4 5. c3 dxc3

Taking the pawn is playable but dangerous since it speeds White's development, especially helping to activate his queen's Knight. From c3 the Knight can leap to d5 to help attack Black's potentially weak dark squares. White also gains time for a potential attack by Qb3, Ng5, or Bg5. However, I think Black survives with good defense and has chances of keeping his material advantage into the endgame. We will examine both accepting and decling the gambit and then it's your call as to which you will play. Accepting the gambit forces Black to play carefully and concretely, responding to direct threats. The advantage of declining the gambit is that you get to play a more positional system with typical themes and motifs.

 

6. Nxc3

A tricky move order not mentioned in theory is 6. Qb3!? Nh6! (6... Qe7 is rarely a safe place for the Queen in these lines and seems to transpose to variations known to be good for White: 7. O-O! (7. Nxc3 Na5) 7... Bg7 (7... Na5?? 8. Qxc3) 8. Nxc3 Na5 9. Qb5 Nxc4 10. Qxc4 c6 11. e5) 7. Bxh6 (7. O-O f6 8. Qxc3 (8. Bxh6 cxb2) (8. Nxc3 Na5) 8... Nf7 9. Be3) (7. Qxc3?? Bb4) (7. Nxc3 Na5 8. Qb5 Nxc4 9. Qxc4 c6 10. Qd4 f6 11. Bf4 Nf7) 7... Bxh6 8. Bxf7+ Kf8 9. Nxc3 Na5 10. Qa3+ (10. Qd5? c6) 10... Kxf7 11. Qxa5 c6 12. Qa4 d6= and though White has some initiative, Black's Bishops are a long termadvantage.

 

6... d6!










Jan Pinski notes in "Italian Game and Evans Gambit" that this "is probably the only sensible way to continue, as most decent players would see within a few minutes." Losing is 6... Bg7? 7. Qb3 Qe7 8. Nd5! Qxe4+ 9. Be2 Unzicker 9... Na5 (9... Kd8 10. O-O Qxe2 11. Bg5+ f6 12. Rfe1 Soltis) 10. Nxc7+ Kd8 11. Qxf7 Pinski.

 

7. Bg5!

"The most annoying" notes Pinski and the only one that really gives Black trouble.

a) 7. Qb3 Qd7! 8. Nd5 Bg7 9. Bd2 (9. O-O?! Na5 10. Qb5 Nxc4 11. Nxc7+ Kd8 12. Qxd7+ Kxd7! 13. Nxa8 b6 Pinski ) 9... Nge7 10. Bc3 (10. Bh6!? O-O 11. Bxg7 Kxg7 12. Qc3+ f6) 10... O-O 11. Bxg7 (11. Nf6+ Bxf6 12. Bxf6 Na5 13. Qe3 Nf5! 14. Qd3 Nxc4 15. Qxc4 Qe6 16. Qxe6 fxe6) 11... Kxg7 12. Qc3+ f6

b) 7. Ng5 Nh6 (7... Ne5!? 8. Qd4 h6 9. f4 c5 10. Bb5+ Bd7 11. Qd5 Nf6 12. Qxb7 Rb8 13. Qxa7 Ra8 14. Qb7 Rb8=) 8. O-O Bg7

 

7... f6

Also playable are 7... Be7 or 7... Qd7 but there are no games to illustrate.

 

8. Be3 Nh6 9. h3 Bg7 10. Nd4

10. Qd5 Qd7 11. O-O-O Nf7 12. h4 (12. Qxf7+ Qxf7 13. Bxf7+ Kxf7 14. Nd5 Bd7! 15. Nxc7 Rac8 16. Nd5 Nb4+ 17. Kb1 Nxd5 18. Rxd5 Bc6) 12... h5 13. Kb1 O-O "Black is in the game and still has the extra pawn" notes Pinski.

 

10... Nxd4 11. Bxd4 c6 12. O-O Qe7 13. f4 Be6=










13... Nf7!? followed by O-O sidesteps White's dangerous sacrifice.

 

14. Nd5?!

A standard sacrifice in such positions, but here it seems overly ambitious. But the natural 14. Bxe6 Qxe6 15. f5 Qe7 looks fine for Black, who retains the extra pawn.

 

14... Qf7?

Black's motto should be "In for a penny, in for a pound"; he has to take the Knight:

14... cxd5! 15. exd5 Bf5 16. Re1 Be4 17. Bd3 f5 18. Bxe4 fxe4 19. Bxg7 (19. Rxe4 Qxe4 20. Bxg7 Nf7 21. Bxh8 Nxh8 22. Qd2 Kf8) 19... Qxg7 20. Rxe4+ Kf7 21. Qb3 Rhb8 22. Rae1 Kg8 and White has insufficient compensation for the piece.

 

15. Nc7+!?

The most dangerous continuation for Black, but not the easiest for White. Better perhaps 15. Nxf6+! Bxf6 16. Bxf6 Bxc4 (16... Qxf6 17. Qxd6) 17. Bxh8 Bxf1 18. Qxf1 O-O-O 19. Bd4 which allows White to recover his pawn with some advantage.

 

15... Qxc7 16. Bxe6 Nf7 17. e5! dxe5

17... fxe5 18. fxe5 (18. Bxf7+ Qxf7 19. fxe5 Qd5 20. Qg4 dxe5) 18... Nxe5 19. Qb3

 

18. fxe5 f5 19. Bxf7+ Qxf7 20. e6! Qc7 21. Bxg7 Qxg7 22. e7!

A brilliant way to trap Black's King in the center!

 

22... Qf6

Not 22... Kxe7? 23. Re1+ Kf8 24. Qd6+ Kg8 25. Re7 or 22... Qxe7 23. Re1

 

23. Re1

23. Qb3! b5 24. Rfe1 may be the improvement.

 

23... Kf7 24. Qb3+ Kg7 25. Qxb7 Rhe8 26. Rac1 Rac8 27. Qxa7?!

27. b3! preserves White's pawns and limits Black's counterplay.

 

27... Qxb2 28. Rb1 Qc3 29. Kh1 c5 30. Rbc1

The players agreed a draw, presumably because with Qg3 to Qc7 Black appears to get sufficient counterplay with the c-pawn to at least force White to exchange it for the e-pawn. Black definitely could have improved earlier, and I think he can hold his own here. Depending on how you look at it, the game either demonstrates that White gets a lot of play for his pawn (in which case it might be safer to decline the sacrifice, as we will examine below) or that Black can survive and hold the material with careful defense. You decide.

1/2-1/2


Game 2: Spanish

Sergey V Kalygin (2482) - Evgeny Romanov (2329) [C60]

Russian Championship Semi-Finals/Tula (3) 2003


1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. Bb5 g6 4. d4 exd4 5. c3!?










This "Romantic " gambit is recommended by Alexander Khalifman in the first volume of his "Opening for White According to Anand," but his treatment of Black's best options is not very thorough. We will examine 5. Bg5 Be7 and 5. Nxd4 Bg7 in later articles.

 

5... dxc3

Khalifman writes that "like in all gambit variations, it is better for Black to take the gift." Though I think Black can accept it, his life might be easier after refusing the gift. In later games, we will also examine declining the gambit with 5... d3 (barely mentioned by Khalifman) or 5... Nge7 (which Khalifman does not take note of as an option from this move order).

 

6. Nxc3 Bg7 7. Bg5

As usual, this is the most annoying move at White's disposal.

 

7... Nce7!










Considered by Glenn Flear the best move. Khalifman fails to mention it.

a) 7... Bf6 8. h4 h6 9. Bxf6 Nxf6 10. e5 Ng4 11. Qe2 O-O 12. O-O-O Khalifman

b) 7... Nf6?? 8. Bxc6 bxc6 9. e5

c) 7... Nge7!? is examined in our next game.

d) 7... f6!? was Smyslov's choice and will be examined in a later game, where I suggest it might be viable if followed up with 8. Bf4 Nge7 9. Qb3 a6 10. Be2 d6 11. O-O Qd7! with the idea of Nd8-e6 and O-O.

 

8. O-O

As Flear points out, White needs an improvement here and might eventually find one, but Black still looks ok:

a) 8. Qb3 f6? (8... h6 9. Bf4 Nf6=) 9. e5 fxg5 10. Nxg5 Nh6 11. Ne6 c6 12. Nxd8 cxb5 13. f4 Rf8 14. O-O a6 15. Rad1 Nhf5 16. Ne4 Kxd8 17. g4 Nh6 18. Qe6 1-0 Chaves,J-Loureiro,L/Rio de Janeiro 1994

b) 8. Qd2!? h6 9. Be3 (9. Bf4 Nf6) 9... Nf6 10. O-O (10. e5 Ng4) 10... c6 11. Bc4 d5 12. exd5 cxd5 13. Bb5+ Bd7 and Black returns the pawn for equality.

c) 8. Ba4!? h6 9. Bh4 Nf6 10. e5 Nh7

 

8... h6 9. Bh4 g5!

It is usually important to break this pin. But an interesting alternative is 9... c6!? 10. Be2 g5 11. Bg3 d5 Flear.

 

10. Bg3 Nf6










11. h4 g4?!

Black's easiest idea is 11... c6 12. Bc4 (12. Ba4 d5) (12. hxg5 hxg5) 12... d5 13. exd5 cxd5 14. Bb5+ Kf8!? (14... Bd7=) 15. Re1 Bg4

 

12. Nd4 O-O?!

12... a6! 13. Be2 d6 Flear

 

13. e5 Nh5 14. Qxg4 Nxg3 15. Qxg3 d6 16. exd6 Qxd6 17. Qxd6 cxd6 18. Rad1 Ng6

Black's two Bishops and active pieces compensate for his damaged structure, but I think I'd prefer to decline the gambit or improve earlier by 11...c6.

 

19. g3

19. h5 Nf4 20. Nde2 Nxh5 21. Rxd6 a6 22. Bd3=

 

19... a6 20. Be2 Re8?!

20... Bh3!= gains a useful tempo for development.

 

21. h5 Ne5 22. Nd5 Nc6 23. Nxc6

23. Nc7 Nxd4 24. Nxe8 Nxe2+

 

23... Rxe2

23... bxc6 24. Nc7 Rxe2 25. Nxa8 d5 transposes to the game line.

 

24. Nb6! bxc6 25. Nxa8 d5

25... Bf8!? 26. Rb1

 

26. Rfe1 Bg4 27. Rxe2 Bxe2 28. Rd2 Bxh5 29. Nc7 a5 30. Nxd5?!

This move cannot be explained, unless White was in time trouble and hoped to bring about what he assumed would be a drawn ending. Instead, 30. Rc2! appears to maintain a clear edge for White.

 

30... cxd5 31. Rxd5 Bf3 32. Rxa5 Bxb2 33. Rb5 Bd4 34. a4 Kf8 35. Rb3 Bc6 36. Rd3 Ba7 37. Rd6 Bf3 38. Rxh6 Ke7 39. Rh4 Bd5 40. Kf1 Kd7 41. Ke2 Kc7 42. g4 Bc4+ 43. Kf3 Kb6 44. g5 Bd5+ 45. Kf4 Ka5 46. f3 Bb8+ 47. Ke3 Ba7+ 48. Ke2 Bb3 49. Kd3 Bb6 50. Rf4 Bc7 51. Re4 Bd6 52. Rd4 Be5 53. Rd7 Kxa4?

Better 53... Be6 or 53... Bf4!?

 

54. f4 Bb2 55. f5 Kb5 56. Rb7+ Ka4 57. Rb6 Be5 58. Ke4 Bc3

once White eliminates Black's only remaining pawn, the ending should probably be drawn.

1/2-1/2


Game 3: Spanish

Lars Ootes (2064) - Mark Haast (2028) [C60]

Arnhem Euwe Stimulans (8) 2007


1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. Bb5 g6 4. d4

The game that follows in some ways resembles another known line (though not one we will examine closely): 4. Nc3 Nge7 5. d4 exd4 6. Nd5 Bg7 7. Bg5 h6 8. Bf6 Bxf6 9. Nxf6+ Kf8 10. O-O (10. Nxd4 Nf5!? 11. exf5 Qxf6 12. Bxc6 dxc6 13. fxg6 Kg7!) 10... Kg7 11. Nd5 Re8 12. Re1 d6 13. Qd2 a6 14. Bxc6 Nxc6 15. Nxd4 Soltis. The main difference is that, with 5.c3 dxc3, White commits to sacrificing a pawn in the following game, which means that Black has the same defensive resources seen in the known line and an extra pawn to boot!

 

4... exd4 5. c3 dxc3 6. Nxc3 Bg7 7. Bg5 Nge7 8. Nd5 h6 9. Bf6

9. Bh4 g5 10. Bg3 d6

 

9... Bxf6 10. Nxf6+ Kf8 11. O-O

11. Qd2! (threatening Qc3) 11... Ng8! 12. Nd5 Nf6 13. Qc3 Kg7 14. O-O-O Re8 15. Rhe1 d6! (15... a6?! 16. Bxc6 Khalifman) 16. Bxc6 (16. e5 Nxd5 17. Rxd5 Kg8) 16... bxc6 17. Qxc6 Be6= Flear, e.g.: 18. Kb1 (18. Nxc7?? Rc8) 18... Nxd5 19. exd5 Bg4.

 

11... Kg7 12. Nd5 d6=

Black is well placed for defense and it is difficult to see how White will make progress. Meanwhile, Black still has his extra pawn.

 

13. Rc1 Bd7 14. Qb3 f6 15. Nf4 Qc8 16. Rfd1 a6 17. Bxc6 bxc6 18. Nd4 Rg8 19. Rd2 Rb8 20. Nfe6+ Kh7 21. Qf3 Bxe6 22. Qxf6 Bxa2 23. Qxe7+ Rg7 24. Qh4 c5 25. Nf3 g5! 26. Qg3 Qe6

Black still has his extra pawn and if he can just make it to an endgame it will be a win.

 

27. e5! Rb6

27... g4!? 28. Nh4 Qxe5 29. Qd3+ Kg8 30. Nf5 Rg5! 31. Qxa6 (31. Nxh6+ Kg7) 31... Rxf5 32. Qxa2+ d5 33. Qa3 Re8

 

28. exd6! cxd6 29. Re1 Qf6 30. Red1 Qf4 31. Qxf4 gxf4 32. Rxd6 Rxb2 33. Rxa6 Bd5!? 34. Ra3 Bb3 35. Rc1 c4 36. h3 Re7 37. Nd4 Rb7 38. Rc3 Rb6 39. Rf3 Kg6

After 40.Rxf4, Black will be down material and it is not clear if he can make progress with the passed c-pawn, so he took a draw. There is no question, however, that Black had earlier chances to make his extra pawn pay.

1/2-1/2


Game 4: Spanish

Devaki Prasad (2380) - Vasily Smyslov (2540) [C60]

Calcutta 1995


1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. Bb5 g6 4. d4 exd4 5. c3 dxc3 6. Nxc3 Bg7 7. Bg5 f6!?

 

 

This is the stem game of Black's favorite way of meeting 7.Bg5 -- though not necessarily the best way. Generally the ...f6 advance is not good for Black, and analysis by Khalifman suggests that is the case here as well. However, Black has done very well in practice.

 

8. Bf4 Ne5

a) 8... Nge7!? may well be worth a try, no matter what Khalifman says about it: 9. Qb3! (to stop Black from castling) 9... a6 (9... d6 10. O-O Bd7 11. Nd5 Na5?! 12. Bxd7+ Qxd7 13. Qc3 Nac6 14. Nxf6+ Bxf6 15. Qxf6 O-O-O 16. Qc3 d5 17. Ne5 d4?! 18. Qd3 Qe6 19. Nxc6 Nxc6 20. Rfc1 Rhe8 21. f3 Yermolinsky - Kreiman, New York 1993) 10. Be2 d6 11. O-O Qd7! This move int roduces an important new plan for securing e6 and eventually castling -- but Black did not follow it up correctly in our stem game.(11... Bd7?! 12. Rac1 (12. Qxb7!?) 12... Qc8 13. Rfd1 Har Zvi - Ballon, Agios Nikolaos 1995) 12. Rac1 (12. Nd5 Nxd5 13. exd5 Nd8!) 12... Ne5? (now 12... Nd8! with the idea of Ne6, O-O and Kh8 appears to hold for Black while retaining the material advantage.) 13. Bxe5! fxe5 14. Ng5! and White was clearly on top, though Black actually went on to win in 0-1 Khaghani, M-Soleimani,S/Esfahan IRI 2005 (49)

b) 8... Nh6?! 9. Nd5! (9. Qd2?! Nf7 10. O-O O-O 11. Bc4 d6 12. h3 Nce5 (12... Kh8) 13. Bxe5 dxe5 14. Rfd1 Qxd2 15. Rxd2 c6?! (15... Kh8!?) (15... Bh6!?) 16. Rad1 Bh6 17. Rd3 b5 18. Bb3 a5 19. Rd6 a4 20. Bxf7+ Rxf7 21. Rxc6 Bd7 22. Rcd6 Be8 23. Rb6 Bf8 0-1 Montheard, X-Okhotnik,V/Le Touquet FRA 2004 (66) and despite returning the pawn, Black managed to win due to his two Bishops.) 9... d6 10. Nd4 Bd7 11. Rc1 O-O 12. Nxc6 bxc6 13. Bxc6 Khalifman

 

9. Nd4?!

9. Qd4! Nxf3+ 10. gxf3 Ne7 11. Ba4 Nc6 12. Qc4 a6 13. Nd5 b5 14. Qc3 Ra7 15. Bb3 Ne5 16. Be3 Rb7 17. f4 Ng4 18. Bd4 c6 19. Rc1 is the main line of Khalifman's analysis which clearly shows that White has good prospects with best play.

 

9... c6 10. Be2 Ne7 11. h4 h5! 12. Qd2 d5 13. O-O-O O-O 14. Nb3 b5 15. exd5 b4 16. Na4 cxd5

and the former World Champion eventually won a very complicated endgame against his IM opponent. However, this variation is considered suspect by theory.

 

17. Kb1 a5 18. Qe3 Bd7 19. Nbc5 Bf5+ 20. Ka1 Qd6 21. f3 Rac8 22. g4 Bc2 23. Rc1 d4 24. Qd2 Bxa4 25. Nxa4 Rxc1+ 26. Rxc1 Rd8 27. gxh5 d3 28. Bd1 gxh5 29. Nc5 Rc8 30. Bb3+ Kh7 31. Bxe5 Qxe5 32. Nxd3 Rxc1+ 33. Qxc1 Qd4 34. Nf4 Bh6 35. Qc2+ f5 36. Nd5 Qg1+ 37. Qb1 Qxb1+ 38. Kxb1 Nc6 39. f4 Nd4 40. Bd1 Kg6 41. Kc1 Ne6 42. Ne7+ Kf7 43. Nxf5 Bxf4+ 44. Kb1 Kf6 45. Bc2 a4 46. b3 a3 47. Bd3 Bd2 48. Kc2 Be1 49. Ne3 Nf4 50. Be4 Ke5 51. Bf3 Bf2 52. Ng2 Ne6 53. Bxh5 Ke4 54. Kd2 Nd4 55. Bg6+ Kf3 56. Ne1+ Bxe1+ 57. Kxe1 Kg4 58. h5 Kg5 59. Kd2 Nb5 60. Kd3 Nc3 61. Kc2 Nxa2 62. Bf7 Nc3 63. Be8 Nd5 64. Bf7 Nf4 65. Kb1 Nxh5 66. Ka2 Ng3 67. Bc4 Kf4 68. Kb1 Ke3 69. Kc2 Nf5 70. Bg8 Kd4 71. Bf7 Ne3+ 72. Kb1 Kc3 73. Bg8 Kd2 74. Bf7 Kc3 75. Bg8 Nc2 76. Bf7 Nd4 77. Ka2 Ne2 78. Kb1 Nc1

0-1


Section Two: Black Pushes Past with ...d3

An often underestimated way of declining the c3 gambit is by pushing past with ...d3. But the move makes sense. After all, why give him what he wants? If White wants to sac a pawn to get his pieces to active squares, why help him? There has not been a lot of master practice with this variation and there is little theory to draw upon, so much of the material that follows is my own work. I have found that there are a lot of thematic ideas in these lines and therefore lots of opportunity to feel in control while catching your opponent off guard.

Game 5: Italian

Johann Jacob Lowenthal - Howard Staunton [C44]

London 1853


It is always a pleasure to discover 150-year-old games that contain viable opening ideas. Staunton conducts the Black pieces with a remarkable sense of prophylaxis and good defensive play for the time, denying his opponent easy piece placement and squelching his initiative. This was the second match between Staunton and Lowenthal, and it almost seems like a game between a modern player and a late Romantic.

1. e4 e5 2. d4 exd4 3. Bc4 Nc6

The best move for getting into our system.

 

4. Nf3

4. c3 Nf6!

 

4... g6 5. O-O Bg7

White is already committed to gambiting the d-pawn, since Black can hold it easily if he wishes.

 

6. Bf4

6. e5!? Nge7 7. Bf4 O-O 8. Nbd2 d6 9. exd6 cxd6 10. Re1 d5

 

6... Nge7

6... d6! first is most precise, to discourage an e5 push, as demonstrated in later games by Westerinen and Gligoric.

 

7. c3 d3










Black can also play differently:

a) 7... dxc3 8. Nxc3 d6 is also playable but gives White much easier development.

b) 7... d5!? is interesting if a bit dangerous here: 8. exd5 Nxd5 9. Bg5! Qd6 10. Re1+ Be6 11. Nbd2! O-O 12. Ne4 Qd7 13. Nc5 Qc8

 

8. Qxd3

8. e5! d5 9. exd6 cxd6 10. Bxd3 O-O

 

8... d6 9. Nbd2 O-O

9... h6!? 10. Qe3 g5 11. Bg3 O-O

 

10. Bb3

10. Qe3! Re8 (10... Be6!?) 11. Ng5 Rf8

 

10... a5 11. a4 b6!?

An interesting way of developing the Bishop.

 

12. Qe3 Ba6 13. Rfd1 Qe8 14. Bh6 Rd8 15. Qg5 Kh8!

Excellent defense, especially for the time! If White can play Qh4 and Ng5 it will be curtains for Black.

 

16. Qh4 Bxh6 17. Qxh6 Ng8 18. Qh4 Qe7! 19. Qh3

White still fantasizes about mate at h7.

19. Ng5 h6! 20. f4 Kg7 21. Ngf3 Qxh4 22. Nxh4 Nge7=

 

19... Ne5 20. Nd4 c5 21. Nc2 Nf6 22. f4 Nd3!

Black's pieces spring to life and find good squares. It appears that White now "sacrifices" a pawn in hopes of opening the f-file for attack, since he has no sense of positional play.

 

23. c4? Nxf4 24. Qf3 Qe5!?

24... Ne6

 

25. Rf1 N4h5 26. g4 Qg5 27. Ne3










27... Nxg4! 28. Nxg4

28. Qxg4 Qxe3+

 

28... Qxd2

Another way to recover the piece is by 28... f5

 

29. Rf2 Qg5 30. Rg2 Bb7 31. Rf1 f6

31... f5!

 

32. Bc2 Bc8 33. h3 Bxg4 34. hxg4 Ng7 35. Rd1 Ne6 36. Rd5 Qc1+ 37. Kh2 Nd4! 38. Qg3?

38. Qc3 Qf4+ is also hopeless but now White simply loses a piece.

 

38... Nxc2 39. Rxd6 Ne3! 40. Rxd8 Nf1+ 41. Kh3 Rxd8

0-1


Game 6: Italian

Atouse Pourkashiyan (2232) - Salome Melia (2251) [C50]

World Championship for Girls Under-16/Halkidiki, Greece (5) 2003


The following game was played in the 2003 World Youth Chess Championships at Halkidiki, Greece, in the section for Girls under age 16. The contestants may have been young girls, but they were already both seasoned masters of the game. With her win against Pourkashiyan, Salome Melia took the lead with a perfect score through five rounds and eventually finished the tournament in third place out of 69, having beaten the players who finished in 1st and 2nd. She currently has a rating of 2441 and holds both the IM and WGM titles.

1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. Bc4 g6 4. d4

White needs to take action in the center or Black will have an easy game.

 

4... exd4 5. c3

The important alternatives 5. Bg5 Be7! 6. Bxe7 Qxe7 and 5. Nxd4 Bg7 6. Be3 Nf6!? will be considered in subsequent articles.

 

5... d3

 

 

This method of declining the gambit is my general recommendation in various lines, on the principle of "why give him what he wants?" White must now make an unnatural Queen or Bishop move in order to recover his pawn. Meanwhile, the Knight he had hoped to develop powerfully to c3 following 5... dxc3 6.Nxc3 is blocked from its best square. White has difficulty finding a natural way to develop his pieces.

 

The gambit line with 5.c3 was first recommended by Wolfgang Unzicker, who analyzed 5... dxc3 6. Nxc3 Bg7?! ( Jan Pinski notes that "most decent players would see within a few minutes that 6... d6! is an absolutely necessary move," and one we will return to at the end of this article when we examine lines where Black accepts the gambit) 7. Qb3 Qe7 8. Nd5 Qxe4+ 9. Be2! for example: 9... Kd8 10. O-O Qxe2 11. Bg5+ f6 12. Rfe1

 

6. Qxd3

a) 6. O-O h6!? (6... Bg7 7. Bg5 Nge7 8. Qxd3 h6 transposes to the next game) 7. b4 a6!? (It is surprising that Black has time for these prophylactic moves) 8. Qb3 Qe7 9. Bf4 d6 10. Nbd2 Be6 11. Bd5 (11. e5! dxe5 12. Nxe5 Nxe5 13. Bxe5 Rh7 14. Rfe1 O-O-O 15. b5 Bxc4 16. Qxc4 axb5 17. Qxb5 Qc5) 11... Nf6 (11... Qf6!? followed by Nge7) 12. Qc4 Qd7 (12... Nd7!?) 13. a4 Bg7 14. Nd4?! Bxd5 15. exd5 Ne5?! (15... Nxd4! 16. cxd4 O-O) 16. Rfe1 O-O 17. Bxe5 dxe5 18. Rxe5 Ng4?! (18... Rad8!) 19. Re4 Nf6 20. Re5 Ng4 21. Re4 Nf6 22. Re5 1/2-1/2 Dizdarevich,M-Cors,H/Darms 1995

b) 6. Bg5 Be7! (White's best move is often Bg5 which almost forces Be7, when the Bishop will not be fianchettoed after all. However, any exchanges will favor the defender and Black gains a tempo if White avoids the exchange.) 7. Bf4 (7. Bxe7 Qxe7 8. O-O Nf6 (or 8... d6 9. Qxd3 Bd7) 9. Qxd3 d6 10. Nbd2 Bd7 followed by O-O-O with good play for Black.) 7... Nf6 8. e5! (8. Qxd3 Na5 9. Bb5 c6 10. Ba4 d5=) 8... Nh5 9. Bh6 d5 10. Bb5 Bf8!? 11. Qd2 Bxh6 12. Qxh6 Qe7 13. O-O Bd7 (Black allowed his structure to be damaged in the stem game: 13... a6?! 14. Bxc6+ bxc6 15. Nbd2 Qf8?! 16. Qe3 Qe7 17. b4 O-O 18. Nd4 Bd7 19. N2b3! 1-0 Humer,W-Baumgartner,H/Linz 1993 (39)) 14. Re1 O-O-O= and Black is fine since 15. Bxc6?! Bxc6 16. g4? d4

c) 6. Bxd3! will be considered below, under 1.e4 e5 2.Nf3 Nc6 3.Bb5 g6 4.d4 exd4 5.c3 d3 6. Bxd3, to which it transposes. Though this move appears to lose a tempo, especially as compared with 1.e4 e5 2.Nf3 Nc6 3.d4 exd4 4.c3 d3 (which we will also consider), it does allow for the most natural development of White's forces, including by c4 and Nc3.

 

6... Bg7 7. O-O

7. Qd5 Qe7 8. O-O Nf6 9. Qd3 O-O=

 

7... Nge7

Also good is 7... d6 8. Bb3 h6 9. Re1 Nge7 10. Bf4 O-O 11. Nbd2 Kh8 12. Rad1 Bg4 13. h3 Be6 14. Qe3 Kh7 15. e5 Nf5 16. Qe2 Re8 17. Qb5 (17. g4 Nh4!) 17... dxe5 18. Bxe5 (18. Qxb7 Bd7 19. Bh2 Nd6 20. Qa6 e4!?) 18... Nxe5 19. Nxe5 Nd6! 20. Qc5 b6 21. Qd4 Bxb3 (21... Bxh3!? 22. Bd5) 22. axb3 Qf6 23. Ndf3 Qf5= (Black has at least equal chances, and his Bishop gives him slightly the better long term prospects.) 24. Qg4 Qxg4 25. Nxg4 a5 26. Rxe8 Rxe8 27. Ne3 Rd8 28. Kf1 Nb7 29. Rxd8 Nxd8 30. Nd5 Ne6 31. Ke2 Kg8 32. Kd3 Kf8 33. Nd2 Ke8 34. Ne4 Kd7 35. g3 Kc6 36. Ne7+ Kb5 37. Nd5 Nc5+!? (37... f5!) 38. Nxc5 Kxc5 39. Ne3 ( White's Knight gets trapped after 39. Nxc7? Kc6 40. Ne8 Bh8) 39... b5 40. f4 c6 41. f5 g5?! 42. g4 Kd6 43. Ke4 Bf6 44. Nc2 Kc5 45. Ne3 Bh8 46. Nc2 Kd6 47. Ne3 Be5 48. Nc2 Bg3 49. Kf3?! (49. Nd4 Bf4 50. Nf3!? (50. Ne2=) 50... f6 (50... Bc1 51. Ne5) (50... c5!?) 51. Ne1 Bc1 52. Nd3 Bd2) 49... Bf4 50. Ne1 Kd5 51. Nd3 Bd6 52. Ke3 c5 53. Nf2 c4! 54. bxc4+ Kxc4 55. Nd3 a4 56. Kd2 Kb3 57. Kc1 a3 58. bxa3 Kxc3 59. Nf2 Bxa3+ 60. Kd1 Kd4 61. Kd2 Bb4+ 62. Ke2 Bd6 63. Nd3 b4 64. Ne1 Kc4 65. Nd3 b3 66. Nb2+ Kd4 67. Kd2 Bb4+ 68. Ke2 Bc3 69. Nd1 b2 0-1 Ho,M-Ganbold,O/San Francisco USA 2005.

 

8. Bf4 d6 9. Nbd2 O-O 10. Rad1 h6 11. Rfe1 g5!

This space-gaining or pin-breaking move is often important for Black, though one must be careful that White cannot successfully sacrifice with Bxg5.)

 

12. Bg3 Ng6 13. Nf1

 










Or 13. h3 Qf6

 

13... Bg4

13... g4!? is too loosening long term: 14. Nd4! (14. e5!?) 14... Nce5 15. Qe2

 

14. h3 Bh5 15. Rd2 Nce5 16. Bxe5 Nxe5 17. Nxe5 Bxe5 18. Ng3 Bg6 19. Qf3 Qf6 20. Qxf6?!

20. Nf5! Kh7 21. Red1 Bxf5 22. exf5 c6 23. Re2 d5 24. Bd3 Rae8=

 

20... Bxf6 21. f3 h5! 22. Kf2 h4 23. Ne2

23. Nf5?! Bxf5 24. exf5 Be5

 

23... Be5 24. Red1 Kg7 25. Nd4 a6 26. Bd5 c6 27. Bb3 Rae8 28. Kf1 Bf4

Black clearly has gained the upper hand, thanks in part to her powerful two Bishops.

 

29. Re2 Re7 30. Bc2 Rfe8 31. Bb3 c5 32. Nc2 f5!

The breakthrough is well timed and wins a pawn due to the pin.

 

33. Ne3 fxe4 34. Nd5 Rd7 35. Nxf4 gxf4 36. Bd5 e3!










37. c4 Re5 38. Ree1 Rg5 39. Be6 Rd8 40. Rd5 Rxd5 41. Bxd5 Bd3+ 42. Kg1 b5 43. cxb5 axb5 44. Rd1 c4 45. b3 Kf6 46. Be4 Bxe4 47. fxe4 Ke5 48. Rd5+ Kxe4 49. Rxb5 c3 50. Rb4+ Kd3 51. Rc4 d5 52. Rc7 e2 53. Kf2 Re8 54. Ke1 Kc2 55. Rd7 Kb1 56. Rxd5 c2

0-1


Game 7: Italian

sallie - goeller [C44]

ICC 2 2 u/Internet Chess Club 2009


I include this ICC blitz game of my own because it usefully demonstrates Black's "by-pass" moves: meeting h4-h5 with ...h6 and ...g5, and meeting c3 with ...d3, in both cases denying White the activity he seeks.

1. e4 e5 2. d4 exd4 3. Nf3 Nc6 4. Bc4 g6 5. h4

a) 5. Bg5! is probably best, when Black really must respond with the illogical looking 5... Be7! 6. Bxe7 (6. Bf4 Nf6) (6. h4 h6) 6... Qxe7 7. O-O Nf6 8. Nxd4 O-O 9. Nxc6 dxc6=

b) 5. Ng5 Nh6 6. h4 Bg7 7. h5 d6 8. hxg6 hxg6 9. Qf3 Ne5 10. Qb3 Nxc4 11. Qxc4 Qe7 12. Bf4 f6! (12... Be6 13. Qb5+ c6 14. Qb4 O-O-O 1/2-1/2 lix08-urusov/Owl21.com 2009 (63)) 13. Nf3 Qxe4+ 14. Be3 c5

 

5... h6!

This is usually the best response to the h4-h5 advance, planning to push past.

 

6. h5 g5! 7. c3 d3!

 










Black can certainly survive dxc3, but why make life hard for yourself?

 

8. Bxd3 Bg7 9. c4 d6 10. Nc3 Be6 11. Be3 Qd7 12. Qd2 O-O-O

Black has at least equality.

 

13. O-O-O










13... f5!?

Better 13... Nf6! with ideas like Bg4xh5 or Ng4

 

14. Nd5??

14. exf5! Bxf5 15. Bxf5 Qxf5 16. Nd5 Nge7 17. Nd4 Bxd4 18. Bxd4 Nxd5 19. cxd5 (19. Bxh8? Ndb4!) 19... Nxd4 20. Qxd4 Qf4+ 21. Qxf4 gxf4 should be about equal.

 

14... f4!

The Bishop is trapped at e3.

 

15. Nxf4 gxf4 16. Bxf4 Bg4 17. Bc2 Bxf3 18. gxf3 Nd4

18... Qf7!

 

19. Bd3 Nxf3 20. Qb4 Ne5 21. Be2 Ne7 22. c5 Qc6 23. Be3 dxc5 24. Bxc5 b6 25. Ba6+ Kb8

White resigns, though he should have at least tried the tricky idea 26.Rxd8+ Rxd8 27.Rh3!? and if 27...Qxc5+? he would draw by 28.Qxc5 bxc5 29.Rb3+ etc.

0-1


Game 8: Italian or Spanish

Laurent Fressinet (2627) - Jha Sriram (2437) [C60]

Paris Open Chess Championship/Paris, France (2) 2005


1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. Bb5

Some of the games cited actually began 3. Bc4 and then transposed after 3... g6 4. d4 exd4 5. c3 d3 6. Bxd3

 

3... g6 4. d4 exd4 5. c3 d3 6. Bxd3!?

Though this move appears to lose a tempo, it does clear the way for the c4 advance, opening up the Knights best square. Play then resembles some lines of the King's Indian.

 

6... d6

This move is often useful, but also good is 6... Bg7 7. O-O Nge7 8. Re1 O-O 9. Bg5 d6 (9... h6 10. Bh4 d6= 11. Nbd2 Be6 (Black eventually has to play 11... g5 12. Bg3 Ng6 13. h3 Qf6) 12. Qc2 Qd7 13. Rad1 a5 14. Bb5 Ra7 15. e5 d5 16. Ne4 Bf5 17. Qc1 g5? Too late.(17... Bxe4) 18. Bg3?! (18. Nf6+! Bxf6 19. exf6 Ng6 20. Bg3 Bg4 21. Ne5 Ngxe5 22. Rxe5 Bxd1?? 23. Rxg5+) 18... Qe6 19. Nf6+ Bxf6 20. exf6 Qxf6 21. Bxc7 g4 22. Ne5 Rc8 23. Nxc6 bxc6 24. Be5 Qg6 25. Qe3 Rd7 26. Bf1 Be4 27. Qc5 Qf5 28. Bg3 h5 29. Qe3 Ng6 30. Qh6 f6 31. Rxe4 Rh7 32. Rf4 Nxf4 33. Qxf4 Qxf4 34. Bxf4 and somehow Black drew in 1/2-1/2 Balogh,E-Dobai,S/Gyongyos 2000 (64)) 10. h3 h6 11. Be3 Be6 12. Nd4 Bd7 13. Nd2 Kh7 14. N2f3 Ne5 15. Nxe5 dxe5 16. Nf3 Be6 17. Qc2 c6 18. Rad1 Qc7 19. Rd2 b6 20. Nh2 Rae8 21. f3 Kg8 22. a4 f5 23. b4 f4 24. Bf2 h5 25. a5 Bf6 26. axb6 axb6 27. Rdd1 Nc8 28. Ra1 Qe7 29. Ba6 Bh4 30. Bxc8 Rxc8 31. Bxh4 Qxh4 32. Qf2 Qxf2+ 33. Kxf2 Kg7 34. h4 Rfd8 35. Re2 Rd3 36. Ra3 Bc4 37. g3 fxg3+ 38. Kxg3 Rxc3 39. Rxc3 Bxe2 and despite his obvious advantage, Black managed to lose this game: 40. f4 exf4+ 41. Kxf4 c5 42. Ke3 Ba6 43. Ra3 Bc4 44. bxc5 Rxc5?! (44... bxc5) 45. Ra7+ Kf6 46. Nf3 Rc6?? 47. e5+! Ke6 48. Nd4+ Kd5 49. Rd7+ Kc5 50. Nxc6 Kxc6 51. Rd6+ Kc5 52. Rxg6 b5 53. Rd6 b4 54. Kd2 Bd5 55. Kc1 Bc4 56. Kb2 Bd5 57. Rf6 Bc4 58. Rf5 Be6 59. Rxh5 Kd5 60. Rg5 Ke4 61. h5 1-0 Hoffmann-Hon Kah Seng,C.

 

7. h3 Bg7 8. c4 Nge7 9. Nc3 O-O 10. Nd5

 

 

10... h6

Black has good play after instead 10... Nxd5! 11. cxd5 Ne5 12. Nxe5 Bxe5 13. O-O f5 14. Bh6 Rf7 (14... fxe4!?) 15. exf5 Bxf5 16. Bxf5 Rxf5 17. Qb3 Rb8 18. Rac1 Kh8

 

11. Bd2! f5?!

a) 11... Bxb2?! 12. Bxh6 Bg7 13. Bxg7 Kxg7 14. Qd2

b) 11... Ne5!? 12. Nxe5 dxe5 13. Bb4 (13. Qc1 Kh7 14. Bb4 Re8! 15. Bxe7 Rxe7 16. Nxe7 Qxd3 17. Qe3) 13... Nxd5 14. cxd5 Re8 15. O-O

 

12. O-O fxe4 13. Bxe4 Bf5 14. Re1 Qd7 15. Qb3! Rae8?! 16. Nxe7+ Nxe7 17. Bxf5 Nxf5 18. Qxb7 Rb8 19. Qd5+ Qf7 20. Bc3 Bxc3 21. bxc3 Rb2 22. Re6 Kh7 23. Rae1 Rxa2 24. Qe4 Ra5

24... Rb2

 

25. Qg4 Rc5 26. R6e4 a5 27. Nd4! Rxc4?

Black still survives after 27... Ng7 28. f4 . Now he is lost.

 

28. Ne6! Rxc3 29. Nxf8+ Qxf8 30. Qf4 Qg8 31. Re7+ Ng7 32. Qd4 Rc5 33. Rd7

1-0


Game 9: Scotch / Goring Gambit

Eero J Raaste (2300) - Heikki MJ Westerinen (2475) [C44]

Helsinki (4) 1975


1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. d4 exd4 4. c3 d3

In Open Gambits, George Botterill notes of this move: "This is analogous to the 5...d3 line against the Scotch Gambit, though a bit more respectable as Black does not have a bishop on c5 hanging around for White's pawns to harry. There is no gambiteering excitement in this line as Black's reticence means that there is to be no early contact. The two sides just develp normally with White retaining slightly the better prospects because he has more space." He concludes by noting that the line "has at least the merit of producing the sort of game in which the players' own abilities and judgement are more important than book knowledge." I could not agree more and think that these are compelling arguments in favor of this method of declining the gambit. We should note, however, that White is generally a tempo up on comparable lines in the Giuoco Piano considered above, where the Bishop has to undevelop from c4 in order to capture the pawn at d3. Black has to play precisely to make this line work.

 

5. Bxd3 d6










If Black wishes to fianchetto the bishop, he should probably play this preliminary move to prevent White's e5 advance -- though in practice Black has had success with an immediate fianchetto as well:

5... g6 6. e5!

(a) 6. O-O Bg7 7. e5 transposes)

(b) 6. Bg5!? does not seem quite as strong: 6... Be7 (6... f6 7. Be3 Nh6 8. h3 Nf7 9. c4 Bb4+ 10. Nbd2 d6 11. Nd4 Bd7 12. N4b3 Qe7 13. O-O Bc5 14. Nxc5 dxc5 15. a3 Rd8 16. Be2 a5 17. Re1 O-O 18. Bg4 Bxg4 19. Qxg4 Nfe5 20. Qh4 Nd4 21. b4 axb4 22. axb4 cxb4 23. Ra5 b6 24. Rd5 Nc2 25. Re2 Nxe3 26. Rxe3 c6 27. Rxd8 Rxd8 28. Re2 g5 29. Qg3 Rd3 30. Nf3 Qd6 31. Re3 Nxf3+ 0-1 Magrini,R-Efimov,I/Milan,ITA 1996) 7. Bf4 Nf6 8. e5 Nh5 9. Bh6 Bf8 10. Bxf8 (10. Be3 d6 11. Bb5 Bd7) 10... Kxf8 11. Qd2 Qe7 (11... d6 12. Qh6+ Kg8 13. exd6 (13. Na3 Bg4) 13... Qxd6 14. Be4 Bf5! 15. Bxc6 (15. Bxf5?? Re8+) 15... Bd3!? (15... Qxc6 16. O-O) 16. Na3 Nf4 17. O-O-O Ne2+ 18. Kd2 bxc6 19. Qe3 Nf4 20. Kc1 Ne2+ 21. Kd2 Nf4=) 12. O-O Nxe5 13. Nxe5 Qxe5 14. f4 (14. Re1 Qf4 15. Re3 d5) 14... Qf6 15. f5 g5! 16. Na3 h6 17. Kh1 d5 18. Nc2 (18. Nb5) 18... Qd6 19. g3 Nf6 20. Rae1 Bd7 21. Nd4?! Re8 22. Qf2 Rxe1 23. Rxe1 Kg7 0-1 Ghizdavu,D-Tseshkovsky,V/Bucharest 1974)

6... d5

(a) 6... d6 7. Qe2 dxe5 8. Nxe5 Nxe5 9. Qxe5+ Qe7 10. Bf4 Bg7 11. Qxe7+ Nxe7 12. Bxc7)

(b) 6... Bg7 7. O-O Nge7 8. Bf4 (8. Re1!? d6 9. exd6 Qxd6 10. Na3) 8... O-O 9. Re1 d6 10. exd6 cxd6 11. Na3)

7. Bg5 Be7 8. Bf4 (8. Bxe7 Ngxe7 9. O-O O-O 10. Qe2 f6) 8... g5!? 9. Bg3 g4 10. Ng1?! (10. Nd4!) 10... Be6 11. Ne2 Qd7 12. Bb5 Bg5 13. Nd2 Nge7 14. Nb3 a6 15. Nc5 Qc8 16. Ba4 O-O 17. Nxe6 Qxe6 18. O-O b5 19. Bc2 Ng6 20. Nd4 Nxd4 21. cxd4 c6 22. f4 gxf3 23. Qxf3 Ne7 24. h4 Bh6 25. Rae1 Bg7 26. h5 c5 27. dxc5 Rae8 28. Qd3 Qh6 29. Re3 Qxh5 30. e6 f5 31. Bd6 Rf6 32. Bxe7 Rxe7 33. Qxd5 Qg4 34. Bxf5 Qb4 35. Qd8+ Bf8 1-0 Pirrot,D-Straub,P/Bad Woerishofen 1993.

 

6. h3

6. Nd4 is analyzed in the next game.

 

6... g6!

In an earlier game with this line, Westerinen instead chose 6... Nf6!? 7. O-O g6 8. Be3 Bg7 9. Nbd2 O-O 10. Qc2 Re8 11. Rad1 b6 12. Bb5 Bd7 13. Qd3 Re7 14. Bc4 Na5 15. Ba6 Qe8 16. Rfe1 Rd8 17. Bf4 h6 18. Re3 Bc6 19. Rde1 Ba8 20. Bb5 Qf8 21. Bh2 Nd7 22. b4 Nc6 23. Bxc6 Bxc6 24. Qa6 Ne5 25. Nd4 Ba8 26. f4 c5! 27. N4f3 Nxf3+ 28. Nxf3 Qe8 Black's two bishops and pressure against e4 give him a clear edge. 29. Qe2 Qa4 30. bxc5 dxc5 31. f5 Rde8 32. fxg6 fxg6 33. e5 Kh7 34. Bg3 Bd5 35. Nh4 Qxa2 36. Qg4 Re6 White's attacking attempts come to nothing and the material eventually tells against him. 37. Rf1 R8e7 38. Kh2 Qd2 39. Rf6 Qxe3 40. Qxg6+ Kh8 0-1 Levy,D-Westerinen,H/Skopje 1972.

 

7. Bg5 Nf6 8. Nbd2 Bg7










We are now entering a middlegame typical of the Black fianchetto system in the open games, which resembles some variations of the King's Indian. Both sides have room to maneuver and White's only claim is his slight space advantage.

 

9. Nd4 O-O 10. Nxc6 bxc6 11. f4 Rb8 12. O-O Qe8 13. Qe1 Nd7 14. Rb1 Nc5 15. Bc2 Ba6 16. Rf3 d5 17. b4 Nxe4 18. Bxe4 dxe4 19. Nxe4 f6 20. Bh4 Bc4! 21. Re3 Qf7 22. Rd1 Rfe8 23. Rd4 Bxa2 24. Nc5 Bd5

A thematic blocking move in these type of positions.

 

25. c4 f5 26. Rd1 Rxe3 27. Qxe3 Re8

27... Bxc4 28. Rd7!

 

28. Qa3?!

28. Qc1! Be6 (28... Be4 29. Rd7 Qf8 30. Qa3) 29. Bf2

 

28... Be4 29. Qa6

 










Or 29. Rd7 Qxc4

 

29... g5!

Opening a critical attacking line for Black's Queen.

 

30. Rd7

30. Bxg5 Qh5 31. Rd2 h6 32. Bd8 (32. Nxe4 fxe4 33. Bd8 e3) 32... Bd4+!! 33. Rxd4 Bxg2! 34. Rd2 (34. Kxg2 Qe2+ 35. Kg3 Re3+ 36. Kh4 Qf3) 34... Bxh3 35. Nd3 Rxd8 36. Qxc6 Rd6

 

30... Qh5! 31. Nxe4

31. Bxg5 Bxg2!!

 

31... fxe4 32. Bxg5 e3 33. Rxg7+ Kxg7 34. Qa1+ Kg8 35. Qe1 e2 36. Kh2 Qf7 37. c5 Qb3 38. Bh4 Qe3 39. Bg3 Rd8 40. Bf2 Qxf4+

A brilliant attacking game from Westerinen.

0-1


Game 10: Scotch / Goring Gambit

Jonathan Penrose - Svetozar Gligoric [C44]

Hastings 1957-1958


This game was played a year before Jonathan Penrose began his decade-long reign as British Champion, but he was already well known as a Goring Gambit specialist. No doubt Gligoric prepared the following interesting fianchetto line just for him.

1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. d4 exd4 4. c3 d3 5. Bxd3 d6 6. O-O

Besides this straight-forward developing move, White can also grab some space in the center with Nd4 and f4 or go for a "mad dog" attack on f7 by Qb3 and Bc4. Black appears to have at least adequate defensive resources against either plan, though the available games are not the best illustrations.

 

a) 6. Nd4 g6 The immediate fianchetto is most in keeping with our system. But Black has many options:

(a1) 6... Ne5 7. Bc2 Nf6 8. O-O Be7 9. f4 Ng6 10. Nf5 O-O 11. Nxe7+ Qxe7 12. Re1 Re8 13. c4 d5!? 14. cxd5 Ng4 15. Be3 (15. d6! Qh4! 16. h3 Qg3! (16... Qf2+ 17. Kh1 Nxf4 18. Bxf4 Qxf4 19. hxg4 Re6 20. g5! Qxg5 21. e5!) 17. hxg4 Nh4 18. Qe2 Bxg4 19. Qf2 Nf3+ 20. Kf1 Nh2+ 21. Kg1 Nf3+=) 15... Nxe3 16. Rxe3 Qc5 (16... Nxf4!) 17. Qd2 Nxf4 18. Nc3 Bd7 19. Rf1 Ng6 20. Kh1 Ne5 21. Rg3 Ng6 22. a3 Qd6 23. Qf2 Re7 24. Nd1 Rae8 25. Ne3 Kh8 26. Bd3 Qb6 27. b4 Qd4 28. Bb1 f6 29. Rd1 Qb6 30. Qd2 Ne5 31. Qc3 Qd6 32. Qd4 b6 33. Qb2 h5!? 34. Nf1 (34. Qe2 g5!? 35. Qxh5+ Rh7 36. Qe2 Ng4) 34... Bb5!? (34... h4!) 35. Qc2 Bxf1 36. Rxf1 g6 37. Rc3? Ng4! 38. g3 Rxe4 39. Qd2 Re2 40. Qd4 Rxh2+ 41. Kg1 Ree2 42. Be4 Rh3 43. Rff3 Re1+ 0-1 Molchanova,T-Slavina,I/Sochi RUS 2005)

(a2) 6... Nf6 7. O-O Be7 (or 7... g6 as in Levy - Westerinen) 8. h3 O-O 9. Be3 Ne5 10. Bc2 d5 (10... c5! 11. Nf3 Nc4 12. Bc1 d5=) 11. Nd2 dxe4?! (11... c5) 12. Nxe4 Nxe4 13. Bxe4 f5 14. Qb3+! Kh8 15. f4 Ng6 16. Bc2 Bc5 17. Rae1 Qd6 18. Qc4 Bd7 19. Kh1 Bb6 20. Nf3 Bxe3 21. Rxe3 Qxf4 22. Qxf4 Nxf4 23. Ne5 Nd5 24. Ref3 Be6 25. Bxf5 Bxf5 26. Rxf5 Rxf5 27. Rxf5 Kg8 28. Nd3 c6= 1/2-1/2 Spielmann,R-Suechting,H/Karlsbad 1911)

(a3) 6... Nxd4!? 7. cxd4 d5! 8. e5 (8. exd5 Nf6!?) 8... Be6?! (8... Ne7! resembles the Svenonius lines we examine below) 9. O-O Qd7 10. Nc3 c6 11. Ne2 f5!? 12. Qc2 g6 A rather ugly way of implementing our g6 system, but somehow Blatny makes it work. 13. Bd2 Nh6 14. b4 Nf7 15. Nf4 Nd8 16. a4 Rc8 17. Rac1 Be7 18. Qb3 O-O 19. Bb1 Bf7 20. b5 Ne6 21. Nxe6 Bxe6 22. Bb4 Bxb4 23. Qxb4 cxb5 1/2-1/2 Alster,L-Blatny,F/Bratislava 1959)

7. O-O Bg7 8. Nxc6 (8. Re1 Nge7 9. Be3 O-O 10. f4 d5 11. e5 Nxd4?! After this, White gains a longterm space advantage.(11... f6!) 12. cxd4 Bf5 13. Nc3 Bxd3 14. Qxd3 Qd7 15. Rac1 Rac8 16. Rc2 a6 17. b3 Nc6 18. a3 Nd8 19. Na4 Ne6 20. Rec1 f6 21. g3?! (21. exf6 Bxf6 22. Nc5 Nxc5 23. dxc5 c6) 21... fxe5?! (21... Rce8=) 22. dxe5 Rce8 23. Bf2 Qb5 24. Qxb5 axb5 25. Nc5 Nxc5 26. Bxc5 Rf7 27. Be3 c6 28. a4 bxa4 29. bxa4 Ra8 30. Ra2 Rd7 31. Bd4 Re8?! 32. a5 g5 33. a6 bxa6 34. Rxc6 1-0 Pasman,M-Shvidler,E) 8... bxc6 9. Na3 Ne7 10. Nc4 O-O 11. Bg5 h6 12. Be3 f5!? (12... d5) 13. exf5 Nxf5 (13... Bxf5! 14. Bd4 Bxd4 15. cxd4 Rb8) 14. Bxf5! Bxf5 15. Bd4 c5 16. Bxg7 Kxg7 play begins to resemble an Old Main Line King's Indian, for both good and bad. White has better long term chances due to the weak Black structure, and Black's play on the b-file does not amount to much. 17. Re1 Qf6 18. Ne3 Be6 (18... Bd7) 19. Re2 a5 20. Qd2 a4 21. a3 Rab8 22. Rae1 Rf7 23. Nd5 Bxd5 24. Qxd5 Qf5 25. Qc6 Qd7 26. Qe4 Rbf8 27. g3 Qb5 28. f4 Qa6 29. Qc2 Qc6 30. Re4 c4 31. Qf2 Qd5? 32. Qd4+! Qxd4+ 33. Rxd4 g5 34. fxg5 Rf2 35. Rxc4 Rxb2 36. Rxc7+ Kg6 37. Rd7 hxg5 38. Rxd6+ Kh5 39. h3 Rff2 40. Re3 1-0 Sharapov,E-Savon,V/Kharkov UKR 2000

 

b) 6. Qb3!? Nf6 7. Bc4 Qe7?! (7... Qd7!) 8. O-O g6 9. Ng5 Ne5 10. Bb5+ c6 11. f4 Neg4 12. h3 h6 13. Nf3 cxb5 14. hxg4 Bxg4 (14... a6) 15. Qxb5+ Qd7 16. Qd3 Bg7 17. Nbd2 O-O (17... O-O-O!?) 18. Nd4! Rfe8 19. Nb5? d5!? (19... Nxe4! 20. Nxe4 Bf5 21. Qxd6 Qxb5 22. Nf6+ Bxf6 23. Qxf6 Bd3) 20. e5 Bf5 21. Qe2 Bg4 (21... Nh5) 22. Nf3 Ne4 23. Qd3 Nc5 24. Qe2 Ne4 25. Kh2 Qf5 26. Qd3 Qh5+ 27. Kg1 Bf5 28. Nfd4 Red8 29. Nxf5 Qxf5 30. Nc7 Rac8 31. Nxd5 Bf8 32. Be3 Ng3 33. Qxf5 Nxf5 34. Nf6+ Kg7 35. Bxa7 Rd2 36. Rf2 Rd3 37. Ne4 Rc4 38. Re2 Ne3 39. Nf2 Ra4 40. Bxe3 Rd8 41. Bd4 1-0 Ritscher,J-Mueller,F

 

6... Nf6!?

If Black intends to play ...g6, best to do it straight away, preserving the possibility of Nge7 to support the Knight at c6, with play not unlike lines we will examine below, e.g.:

6... g6 7. h3 Bg7 8. Nd4 Nge7 9. f4?! Nxd4! 10. cxd4 Bxd4+ 11. Kh1 c5?! (11... O-O) 12. f5 d5 13. f6! Nc6 14. exd5 (14. Nc3!) 14... Qxd5 15. Nc3 Bxc3 16. bxc3 Bxh3 17. Qe2+ Be6 18. Be4 Qc4 19. Qe1 h5 20. Rf4 Qa6 21. Bxg6!? O-O-O! 22. Bc2 c4 23. Qf2 h4 24. Rxh4 Qa5 25. Bg5 Qxg5 0-1 Navarro Torres,P-Hammer,J/Gibraltar ENG 2008.

 

7. Nbd2

a) 7. Na3!? (with the idea of Nc4-e3-f5 or Nc2-d4) 7... g6!? (7... Be7) 8. Bg5 h6 9. Bf4 Bg7 10. Qd2 g5 11. Be3 O-O 12. Nc4=

b) 7. Bf4 g6 8. Qd2 Bg7 9. Bh6 Bxh6 10. Qxh6 Ng4 11. Qf4 (11. Qg7 Qf6 12. Qxf6 Nxf6=) 11... Qe7 12. Nbd2 Bd7 planning Ne5 and O-O-O is equal

c) 7. Bb5 Bd7

 

7... g6










8. Bb5!

Probably the strongest plan, to force through the e5 advance and weaken Black's structure. Also good is 8. Nd4!?

 

8... Bg7 9. e5! dxe5 10. Nxe5 O-O!

As is often the case in the open games, Black must not worry about pawns but only counter-play.

 

11. Nxc6 bxc6 12. Bxc6 Rb8 13. Qa4

13. Nb3! Nd7!? 14. Be3 Ne5 15. Qxd8 Rxd8 16. Be4 f5 17. Bc2 a5 and Black has some counterplay, but perhaps not enough for the pawn.

 

13... Rb6 14. Nc4 Ra6 15. Qb5 Qe7 16. Bd2 Qe6 17. Bf3 Bd7 18. Qc5 Ne4 19. Bxe4 Qxe4

Black gains the two bishops and has the first tangible compensation for the pawn.

 

20. Rfe1 Qd3 21. Be3 Be6 22. Ne5 Qc2 23. Qb5 Rd6

23... Rxa2? 24. Rxa2 Bxa2 25. Nd7!

 

24. Nf3 a6 25. Qe2 Qxe2 26. Rxe2 Rfd8 27. Bd4

27. Nd4 Bc4 28. Ree1

 

27... Bg4 28. Bxg7 Kxg7 29. h3 Bxf3 30. gxf3 Rd3

With the doubled f-pawns and his absolute control of the d-file, Black has sufficient compensation to hold the draw, but nothing more.

 

31. Kg2 R8d5 32. Kg3

32. h4 g5!

 

32... Rg5+ 33. Kh2 Rxf3 34. Rg1 Rgf5 35. Kg2 Rd3 36. Kh2 Rdf3 37. Kg2 R3f4 38. Rd1 Rg5+ 39. Kh2 Rf3 40. Rd4 Rh5 41. h4 Rhf5 42. Kg2 R3f4 43. Rxf4 Rxf4 44. Kg3 Rf5 45. Re4

1/2-1/2


Game 11: Spanish

Tigran Gharamian (2467) - Julian Radulski (2494) [C60]

Open A/Le Touquet FRA (9) 2006


1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. Bb5 g6 4. d4 exd4

The old main line was 4... Nxd4?! 5. Nxd4 exd4 6. Qxd4 Qf6 but Alekhine gives the refutation in his notes to Tarrasch - Alekhine, Carlsbad 1923: 7. e5! Qb6 8. Qxb6! ( unnecessarily complicated is 8. Qd3!? c6 9. Bc4 Qa5+ 10. Nc3 Qxe5+ 11. Be3 d5 12. O-O-O! Bf5 13. Qd2 O-O-O 14. Bxd5!! cxd5 15. Nb5 f6? 16. Rhe1 a6? 17. Bf4 1-0 Zaitsev,I-Suitieev/USSR 1968 (29)) 8... axb6 9. Nc3 Bb4 (9... Be7 10. Bf4! Alekhine) (9... c6! 10. Bc4 d5 11. exd6 Bxd6 12. O-O Bf5 13. Re1+ Kf8 14. Be3 Bosch - Loman, the Hague 1929, as mentioned by Khalifman.) 10. Bd2 Ra5?! 11. a4! c6 12. Ne4! Bxd2+ (12... cxb5? 13. Bxb4 Rxa4 14. Nd6+) 13. Kxd2 Nh6 (13... cxb5 14. Nd6+ Kf8 15. Nxc8) 14. b4! Ra8 15. Nd6+ Ke7 16. Bd3 f6 17. f4 Nf7 18. Nc4 fxe5 19. fxe5 Ra6 20. b5 Ra7 21. Rhe1 Ke6 22. Nxb6 Nxe5 23. c4 d6 24. Kc3 Kf6 25. Rad1 Bg4 26. Rd2 Rd8 27. Bc2 Bf5 28. Bxf5 gxf5 29. Red1 Nf7 30. Kb4 Ke7 31. Rf1 Nh6 32. Re2+ Kf6 33. Rfe1 Ng8 34. Re8 Rxe8 35. Rxe8 Kf7 36. Rd8 1-0 Kasparov,G-Garcia Santos,G/Simul. Galicia 1991.

 

5. c3 d3!?

As usual, pushing past is the best way to keep the game in positionalterritory. However, as we will see below, Black can also decline the pawn with 5...Nge7.

 

6. Qxd3 Bg7 7. h4!?

Khalifman's recommendation, which he attributes to GM Bezgodov.

 

7... h6! 8. h5

Khalifman's analysis ends with " 8. Bf4 " -- but Black has lots of ideas, beginning with 8... Nf6! eyeing the weakened g4.

 

8... g5!

 










As usual, Black simply pushes past any White advances, denying him any leverage in the position.

 

9. Nd4!?

White plays for the f4 pawn break, but Black now gets the first break in the center.

9. Be3 Nf6 10. Nbd2 Ng4 11. Bc5 d6 12. Bd4

 

9... Nxd4! 10. cxd4 c6 11. Bc4

11. Ba4 d5 12. e5 Ne7=

 

11... d5! 12. exd5 Ne7!?










12... cxd5 13. Bb5+ Bd7 14. O-O Ne7= also looks perfectly playable, with potential targets at d4 and h5.

 

13. Nc3

Black has at least sufficient compensation for the pawn after 13. dxc6 Nxc6 14. d5 (14. Qe4+ Qe7 (14... Kf8!?) 15. Qxe7+ Kxe7 16. d5 Nb4 17. Na3 Rd8=) 14... Ne5 15. Bb5+ Bd7 16. Bxd7+ (16. Qe2 Qa5+) 16... Qxd7 17. Qb3 O-O-O 18. Nc3 Qg4!

 

13... O-O 14. O-O cxd5 15. Bb3 Bg4!

Black often has a chance to go after this over-extended pawn.

 

16. Be3 Bxh5 17. Qb5 Qd6 18. Nxd5 Nxd5 19. Qxd5 Qxd5 20. Bxd5 Rab8!?

Black gets little from 20... Rad8 21. Bxb7 Bxd4 22. Bxd4 Rxd4 23. b3 Rd2 24. Rfe1=

 

21. Bb3 Rfd8 22. d5

Surrendering the b-pawn instead.

 

22... b6 23. Rac1 Bxb2 24. Rc7! a5 25. Rc6 b5 26. Bb6

26. Rxh6 Be2 27. Re1 Bc4=

 

26... a4!?

A rather standard Exchange sac these days.

 

27. Bxd8 Rxd8 28. Bd1 Bg6 29. Rb6?!

29. Bc2! appears to make things difficult for Black.

 

29... Bd3 30. Bxa4 Bxf1 31. Kxf1 bxa4 32. Rxb2 Rxd5 33. Rb4 Ra5 34. a3 h5

White's Rook is perfectly positioned to hold the draw.

 

35. g3 Kg7 36. f3 Kg6 37. Kf2 f6 38. Kg2 Kf5 39. Kf2 g4 40. fxg4+ hxg4 41. Rf4+ Kg5 42. Kg2 f5 43. Rb4 Ra8 44. Rc4 Kf6 45. Rb4 Ke5 46. Kf2 Ra5 47. Kg2 Ra6 48. Kf2 Kd5 49. Kg2

A fascinating high-level encounter that demonstrates the viability ofdeclining the gambit by ...d3.

1/2-1/2


Game 12: Spanish

Nikolay Zhornik (2313) - Yuriy Ajrapetjan (2384) [C60]

Ukraine Championship/Alushta UKR (8) 2006


1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. Bb5 g6 4. d4 exd4 5. c3 d3 6. Qxd3 Bg7 7. O-O Nge7 8. Bf4

8. Nbd2 O-O 9. Re1 d6 10. Bc4 Ne5 11. Nxe5 dxe5 12. Qe2 c6?! ( Advancing the c-pawn is dangerous, as it weakens the d6 square. Better seems 12... Qd6 with ideas like Qf6, h6 and Be6.) 13. Nf3 h6 14. Be3 b6 15. Rad1 Qc7 16. Qd2 Kh7 17. Qd6! Qxd6 18. Rxd6 Rb8 19. h3 Rb7 20. Red1 Rc7 21. a4 Bb7 22. a5 Nc8 23. Rd7 Rxd7 24. Rxd7 Ba8 25. Bxf7 bxa5 26. Nh4 1-0 Fressinet, L-Yusupov,A/Blitz-Ajaccio FRA 2007. Though a blitz game, this offers a useful warning about weakening d6.

 

8... d6 9. Na3

9. Nbd2 O-O 10. Rfe1 a6 11. Ba4 Ne5 12. Nxe5 dxe5 13. Qxd8 Rxd8 14. Bg5 Kf8?! (14... Be6! 15. Red1 (15. Bxe7 Rxd2) 15... f6=) 15. Bb3! Bd7 16. Rad1 f6?! 17. Be3 Be8 18. Nf1 (18. f4!) 18... Bf7 19. Bxf7 Kxf7 20. Bc5 Bh6 21. Be3 Bxe3 22. Nxe3 Ke6= 23. Kf1 Nc6 (23... f5!) 24. Ke2 Na5 25. b3 Nc6 26. f3 1/2-1/2 Coleman,J-Aryanejad,H/Abu Dhabi UAE 2005.

 

9... O-O 10. Rad1 a6 11. Ba4 Be6

 










12. Bb3 Qc8

12... Bxb3 13. axb3 Qd7 14. e5 Qg4 15. exd6 Qxf4 16. dxe7 Rfe8 17. Rfe1 Rxe7 18. Rxe7 Nxe7=

 

13. Nc4! b5 14. Ne3 Na5 15. Bd5

15. Bxe6 fxe6!?

 

15... Nxd5 16. exd5 Bg4 17. Nxg4 Qxg4= 18. Bc1 Rfe8 19. Rfe1 Qc4 20. Qxc4 Nxc4 21. Kf1 a5 22. Rxe8+ Rxe8 23. Nd4 Bxd4! 24. Rxd4 Nb6 25. b3 a4 26. Bd2 f5!? 27. Rb4 axb3

1/2-1/2


Game 13: Spanish

Andrey Zhigalko (2526) - Evgeny Golcman (2296) [C60]

Pardubice (2) 2005


1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. Bb5 g6 4. d4 exd4 5. c3 d3 6. Qxd3 Bg7 7. O-O Nge7 8. c4 d6!










8... O-O 9. c5!? d6 10. cxd6 Qxd6 11. Qxd6 cxd6 12. Nc3 Bg4 13. Bf4 Bxf3 14. gxf3 Be5 15. Bh6 Rfd8 16. Rfd1 Nd4 17. f4 Bf6 18. Kg2 Rac8 19. Bd3 Ne6 20. f5 Nc5 21. Bc2 Na6 (21... gxf5 22. exf5 d5) 22. Rab1 Nb4 23. Bb3 1-0 Zozulia,A-Sabirova,O/Tashkent UZB 2008 (61).

 

9. Nc3 O-O 10. h3 h6 11. Rd1

11. Nd5 Ne5=

 

11... Kh7 12. Bf4 Be6 13. Qe2 Qb8!? 14. Rac1 a6 15. Ba4 Ne5!?

15... Re8

 

16. Nxe5 dxe5 17. Be3 Rd8 18. Nd5 Nc8 19. Qf3 Nd6 20. c5 Nxe4 21. Qxe4 f5 22. Qh4 Rxd5 23. Qe7 Qg8! 24. Bxh6!

24. Qxc7 Qf7 25. Qxf7 Bxf7=

 

24... Qf7 25. Qxf7 Bxf7 26. Bg5 Bh6 27. Bxh6 Kxh6 28. c6 bxc6?!

This plays into White's plan and gives him targets of attack. Meanwhile, the safe 28... b6 29. Bb3 Rxd1+ 30. Rxd1 Be8! offers Black even chances.

 

29. Bxc6 Rxd1+ 30. Rxd1 Rb8 31. b3 Rb6 32. Rc1 Kg7 33. Ba4 Rb7 34. Rc5 e4 35. Kh2 Kf6 36. Kg3 Be6 37. h4 Rb6!? 38. Rxc7 Rd6 39. Rc6 Rd2 40. Rxa6 Rxa2 41. Rb6?

White is clearly better after 41. b4

 

41... Ke5! 42. Bc6 f4+ 43. Kh2 Bf5 44. Be8 Rxf2 45. Bxg6 Bxg6 46. Rxg6 e3 47. h5? Rc2

47... e2

 

48. h6 Rc8 49. h7 Rh8 50. Kg1 Rxh7 51. Kf1 Rb7 52. Rg8 Rxb3 53. Re8+ Kd6

53... Kd4

 

54. Re4 Rb1+ 55. Ke2 Rb2+ 56. Ke1!= 1/2-1/2


Game 14: Spanish

Andras Csirik (2271) - Zoltan Simonyi (2226) [C60]

FSIM February/Budapest HUN (3) 2009


1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. Bb5 g6 4. d4 exd4 5. c3 d3 6. Bg5!










This move is typically the most annoying for Black and I think this is the most challenging line in the entire 5...d3 system.

6. Qxd3 Bg7 7. Bg5 Nge7 is too easy: 8. Nbd2 d6 9. h4 h6 10. Bxc6+ bxc6 11. Bf4 Bg4 12. O-O-O Qb8 13. Nc4 O-O 14. e5 Nd5 15. Bg3 h5 (15... Bf5 16. Qd2 Qb5) 16. Nd4 Bxd1 17. Rxd1 Ne7?! (17... Qb7) 18. exd6 cxd6 19. Bxd6 Qd8 20. g4 hxg4 21. h5 gxh5 22. Rh1 Ng6 23. Qf5 Bh6+ 24. Kc2 Qg5 25. Qxg5 Bxg5 26. Bxf8 Rxf8 27. Rxh5 Bh4 28. Nf5 Bxf2 29. Nh6+ Kg7 30. Nxg4 Bb6 31. Nd6 f6 32. Nf5+ Kf7 33. Rh7+ Ke6 34. Ng7+ Kd5 35. Rh6 f5 36. Rxg6 fxg4 37. Rg5+ Kd6 38. Rxg4 Rf2+ 39. Kb3 Be3 40. Kc4 Bh6 41. Rg6+ 1-0 Velimirovic,D-Mukhametov,E/Cetinje tt 1992.

 

6... Be7

This move is typically the best response to Bg5, despite the fact it forsakes the fianchetto. The alternatives are worth a look but no practical examples apply:

a) 6... f6!? 7. Be3 Nh6 8. h3 Nf7 9. O-O

b) 6... Nce7 7. e5 Bg7 8. O-O h6 9. Bh4 g5 10. Bg3 Nf5 11. Bxd3 Nge7 12. Na3

 

7. Bxe7!

a) 7. h4 d6 (7... h6!? 8. Bf4 Nf6 9. e5 Nh5 10. Be3 a6 11. Bxd3 d6) (7... a6!? 8. Bxd3 d5 9. Qe2 Be6 (9... Bg4!? 10. Nbd2 d4!?) 10. Nbd2 h6 11. Bxe7 Qxe7 12. O-O-O O-O-O) 8. Nbd2 h6 9. Bf4 Bd7?! (9... Nf6) 10. Qb3 Nf6 11. Bxd3 Qc8 12. Nd4 h5 13. Nxc6 Bxc6 14. f3 Qd7 15. a4 a5 16. Nf1 d5= 17. e5 Qe6 18. Qc2 Nd7 19. Qe2 O-O-O 20. Nd2 Nc5 21. b4 axb4 22. cxb4 Nxd3+ 23. Qxd3 Bxb4 (23... f6!) 24. O-O Bxd2? (24... Bc5+ 25. Be3 Bxe3+ 26. Qxe3 d4) 25. Qxd2 d4 26. Rfc1 1/2-1/2 Velimirovic,D-Muratovic,A/Vrnjacka Banja SCG 2004 (42)

b) 7. Bf4 a6! (7... d6 8. O-O Nf6 9. Qxd3 O-O 10. Nbd2 Re8 11. Rfe1 Bf8 12. Rad1 h6 13. h3 a6) 8. Bxd3 (8. Bxc6 dxc6=) (8. Bc4 Nf6 9. Qxd3 Na5 10. e5 Nh5 11. Bh6 Nxc4 12. Qxc4 d5=) 8... d6 (8... Nf6!? 9. e5 Nh5 10. Bh6 d6 11. Bc4 Bf8 12. Bxf8 Kxf8 13. exd6 Qxd6 14. Qxd6+ cxd6 15. Nbd2 Be6 is similar to the game continuation) 9. O-O (9. Qb3!? Nf6 10. O-O (10. Bh6?! Ng4 11. Bg7 Rg8 12. Bd4 Be6 13. Bc4 (13. Qxb7 Na5 14. Qb4 c5) 13... Na5 14. Qa4+ Qd7) 10... Nd7 11. Bc4 O-O 12. Bh6 Nc5 13. Qc2 Re8 14. b4 Be6 15. Bd5 Nd7) 9... Nf6 10. Nbd2 O-O 11. h3 Re8 is playable for Black.

 

7... Qxe7

7... Ngxe7!? 8. Qxd3 O-O 9. O-O a6 10. Bc4 Na5.

 

8. O-O Nf6

8... a6!? 9. Bxc6 (9. Bxd3 Nf6 10. Nbd2 O-O) 9... dxc6 10. Qxd3 Be6 (10... Bd7!? 11. Qd4 f6 12. e5 c5 13. Qf4 O-O-O) 11. Nbd2 Nf6 12. Rfd1 c5 13. Ng5 Nd7 14. Nxe6 Qxe6 15. b4 O-O.

 

9. e5 Nh5 10. Re1 O-O 11. Qxd3 d6

11... Nd8!? with the idea of a6, b5, Bb7, Ne6, and Nf4 etc.

 

12. exd6

12. Bxc6 bxc6 13. Nbd2 Be6.

 

12... Qxd6 13. Qxd6 cxd6 14. Nbd2 Rd8 15. Rad1 d5 16. Bxc6 bxc6 17. Nd4 c5?

 










Black can still hang in there with 17... Bd7

 

18. Nc6! Rd6 19. Ne7+ Kf8 20. Nc4 Rd8 21. Nxd5 Bb7 22. Nde3 Nf4 23. Na5 Ba6 24. c4 Ne6 25. b3 Nd4 26. Nd5 Rd6 27. Re4 Rad8 28. Rde1 Ne6 29. a3 Rb8 30. f4 Kg7 31. g4 Nd4 32. R1e3 Nc2 33. Rf3 Re6 34. Rxe6 fxe6 35. Nc7 Bc8 36. Nc6 Rb7 37. Ne8+ Kf8 38. Nd6 Rc7 39. Ne5 Nxa3 40. Rd3 Bb7 41. Nxb7 Rxb7 42. Nd7+ Ke7 43. Nxc5 Rc7 44. Ne4 Nc2 45. Kf2 a5 46. Rh3 Kf8 47. Ng5 Kg8 48. Nxe6 Rc6 49. Rc3 Nb4 50. Nd4 Rc7 51. Kf3 Kf7 52. Rc1 Rd7 53. Rd1 Ke8 54. Re1+ Kf7 55. Nb5 Rd2 56. h3 Nc2 57. Re2 Rd3+ 58. Ke4 Nb4 59. Re3 Rd2 60. f5 Rh2 61. Kf4 gxf5 62. Nd6+ Kf6 63. g5+ Kg6 64. Re6+ Kg7 65. Nxf5+ Kg8 66. Re8+ Kf7 67. Re7+ Kg8 68. Rg7+ Kf8 69. Rxh7 Rb2 70. g6 Nd3+ 71. Kg3

1-0


Section Three: Black Declines the Gambit with ...Nge7

As a bonus, I have decided to include what amounts to a second system of defense for Black in the Open Games with an early ...Nge7. Not all of the following games fit into the fianchetto system that is our focus, but almost all of them could and there are many transpositions back and forth. Readers should note that these lines also represent a method of meeting White c3 followed by d4 systems.

Game 15: Danish Gambit

Martin Voigt (2300) - Jonny Hector (2515) [C22]

Hamburg-ch int/Hamburg (1) 2000


1. e4 e5 2. d4 exd4 3. c3

In future articles we will consider 3. Qxd4 Nc6 4. Qe3 g6!?

 

3... Ne7

The Svenonius Defense has much to recommend it, not least being that it is almost unknown to theory. The Knight is well placed to support the d5 thrust without being attacked by the e5 advance. If Black wishes to try to transpose into the "push past" lines considered above, perhaps a way to do that is 3... d3 4. Bxd3 d6 5. Nf3 Nf6 6. Bf4 g6 7. Qd2.

 

4. cxd4

4. Nf3 d5 5. Qxd4 Nbc6 6. Bb5 Be6 (6... Bd7!? 7. Qe3 Collijn says += 7... dxe4 8. Qxe4 a6 9. Bc4 Bf5 with the idea of Qd7 and O-O-O.) (6... Qd6!? Svenonius) 7. exd5 Qxd5=.

 

4... d5 5. e5

a) 5. exd5 Nxd5 6. Nf3 Bb4+ 7. Bd2 Bxd2+ (7... O-O! 8. Bxb4?! Nxb4 9. Be2 Bf5! 10. Na3 N8c6 11. O-O Qf6) 8. Qxd2 O-O 9. Be2 Nd7 The idea of this move is essentially to reinforce the blockade at d5, but Black's pieces end up passively situated.(9... Qf6! with the idea of Nf4) 10. O-O N7f6 11. Nc3 Bf5 12. Rac1 c6 13. Nxd5 Nxd5 1/2-1/2 Bialecki,M-Zarebski,C/Lublin 1999

b) 5. Nc3 dxe4 6. Bc4 Nf5! 7. Nge2 Nd6.

 

5... Nf5

5... c5!? 6. Nf3 Nbc6 7. Nc3 Bg4 8. Be3 (8. dxc5 Ng6 9. Nxd5 (9. Be2 Bxc5 10. Bg5 Be7 11. Bxe7 Ngxe7 12. O-O O-O=) 9... Bxc5 10. Be2 O-O 11. O-O Ncxe5 12. Nxe5 Bxe2 13. Qxe2 Qxd5 14. Nxg6 hxg6 15. Be3=) 8... Bxf3! (8... Nf5 9. Qb3!? Rc8 10. Qxb7 Nfxd4 11. Bxd4 cxd4 12. Bb5) 9. gxf3 cxd4 10. Bxd4 Nf5! 11. Bb5 Qh4! 12. Ne2 Bb4+ 13. Bc3 O-O 14. Bxc6 (14. Qd3 Bxc3+) 14... bxc6 (14... Bxc3+) 15. Bxb4 Qxb4+ 16. Qd2 Qe7! 17. Qf4 Nh4! 18. O-O (18. O-O-O Rfe8) 18... Qxe5! 19. Qxh4 Qxe2 20. Qa4 Qxf3 21. Rfe1 Qf6 22. b3 Rae8 23. Rad1 Re6 24. Rxe6 fxe6 25. Qxa7 Qg6+ 26. Kf1 Qc2 27. Re1 c5 28. Re2 Qd1+ 29. Re1 Qd4 30. Re2 h6 31. a4 Rf4 32. Qb8+ Kh7 33. Qb5 c4 34. bxc4 Qd1+ 35. Re1 Qd3+ 36. Re2 Re4 37. cxd5 Qd1+ 0-1 Hagesaether,T-Hector,J/Copenhagen 2003.

 

6. Nc3 Be7 7. Nf3 O-O 8. Bd3 Nc6 9. Ne2 f6! 10. a3?

10. O-O g5!?

 

10... fxe5 11. dxe5 Nh4!

A thematic way of eliminating White's best defender of the e5 pawn.

 

12. Nxh4 Bxh4 13. Bf4










13. O-O Nxe5

 

13... Nxe5!

Anyway! White must recapture, but his King will be in grave danger.

 

14. Bxe5 Bxf2+ 15. Kd2

15. Kf1? Bg3+

 

15... Qg5+! 16. Bf4 Rxf4!

The clearest method available. Black gains two pawns, the initiative, and a potentially powerful Bishop pair for the Exchange. An interesting option is 16... Qxg2!?.

 

17. Nxf4 Qxf4+ 18. Kc2 Bg4 19. Qf1

19. Qd2 Be3 20. Qb4!?

 

19... c5! 20. h3 Bd7 21. Kb1 c4 22. Bc2 Re8 23. Ka2 d4! 24. Qd1 d3 25. Rf1 Re2! 26. Rc1 Be6 27. Ka1 Qe5

0-1


Game 16: Goring Gambit

Dietmar Heutgens - Reinhard Schischke (2300) [C44]

NRW-ch/Bad Oeynhausen (2) 1984


1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. d4

Black can also use this system against the Ponziani move order, as you see in the next game: 3. c3 Nge7 4. Bc4 d5 5. exd5 Nxd5 6. d4 exd4 7. O-O.

 

3... exd4 4. c3 Nge7 5. Bc4 d5 6. exd5 Nxd5 7. O-O

7. Nxd4 Nxd4 8. Qxd4 Be6 (8... Qe7+!) 9. O-O Qf6 10. Qxf6 gxf6 11. Nd2 Be7 12. Re1 Rg8 13. Nb3 O-O-O 14. Kh1 Nb6 15. Bf1 (15. Bxe6+ fxe6 16. Rxe6?? Rd1+) 15... Nc4 16. Nd4 Ne5 17. Bf4?! (17. f4 Ng4 18. h3) 17... Bd6 18. b3 Ng4 19. Bg3 Rge8 20. Rad1 Bxg3 21. fxg3 Nf2+ 22. Kg1 Nxd1 23. Rxd1 c5 24. Bb5 Re7 25. Rc1 cxd4 26. cxd4+ Rc7 27. Rf1 Rxd4 28. Rxf6 Rc1+ 29. Rf1 Rxf1+ 30. Kxf1 Rd2 31. a4 Bxb3 0-1 Buckley,D-Lang,H/4NCL9697 BA-RI 1997

 

7... Bg4!

a) 7... Nb6 8. Bb5 (8. Re1+ Be7 9. Bb5 O-O 10. Bxc6 bxc6 11. Nxd4 Bd6 12. Nd2 c5 13. Nb5 Bb7 14. Nxd6 cxd6 15. Qg4 f5 16. Qg3 Qd7 17. Nf3 Nd5 18. c4 f4 19. Qh4 Nf6 20. Bxf4 h6 21. Bg3 Rae8 22. Rad1 Ne4 23. Ne5 Qf5 24. Ng4 h5 25. Ne3 Qf7 26. f4 g6 27. Nd5 Kg7 28. Rd3 Bc6 29. h3 a5 30. Kh2 Bxd5 31. Rxd5 Nxg3 32. Qxg3 Rxe1 33. Qxe1 Qxf4+ 34. Qg3 h4 35. Qxf4 Rxf4 36. Rxd6 Rxc4 37. Ra6 a4 38. b3 1/2-1/2 San Claudio-Padras,S/Spain 1985) 8... Bd7 9. Bg5 f6 10. Nh4!? Bd6 (10... fxg5? 11. Qh5+ Ke7 12. Re1+ Kd6 13. Nd2 Kc5 14. a4) (10... Kf7!?) 11. Re1+ (11. Qh5+ Kf8 12. Ng6+ Kg8 13. Nxh8 Be8) 11... Kf7 12. Bd2 Re8 13. Bd3 g6 14. Qc2 Rxe1+ 15. Bxe1 f5 16. Nf3 Qf6 17. Na3 Ne5 18. Nxd4 Bxa3 19. bxa3 c5 20. Nf3 Nxf3+ 21. gxf3 Bc6 0-1 Velimirovic,D-Tolush,A/Polanica Zdroj 1964.

 

b) 7... Be7 8. Nxd4! (8. Qb3 Be6!? (8... O-O!? 9. Bxd5 Na5! 10. Bxf7+ (10. Qb5 c6 11. Bxc6 Nxc6) 10... Rxf7 11. Qa4 c5 12. cxd4 Bd7) 9. Nxd4 (9. Qxb7 Na5 10. Bb5+ Kf8 11. Qa6 c5) 9... Nxd4 10. cxd4 O-O 11. Nc3 (11. Qxb7? Rb8 12. Qxa7 Qd7 13. Qa6 Rb6 14. Qa5 Bb4 15. Qa7 Qc6) 11... c6 (11... Nxc3 12. bxc3 Bxc4 13. Qxc4 Bd6=) 12. Bxd5 (a) 12. Qxb7? Nxc3!) (b) 12. Nxd5 Bxd5 13. Bxd5 Qxd5 14. Qxd5 cxd5=) 12... cxd5 13. Qxb7 Bd6 14. Qa6 Rb8 15. Bg5? Diagram # 15... Bxh2+ 16. Kxh2 Qxg5 17. Qxa7 Rxb2 18. Rad1 Rc2 19. Rd3 Rc8 20. Qa3 Bf5 21. Rf3 Bg4 22. Rg3 Rxf2 23. Rxf2 Qh4+ 24. Kg1 Qxg3 25. Qe7 Be6 26. Ne2 Qe3 27. Nf4 h6 0-1 Lindgren,M-Hector,J) 8... Ne5 (8... O-O 9. Nxc6 bxc6 10. Qh5) 9. Bb5+ (9. Bxd5 Qxd5 10. Re1 Ng6 11. c4 Qd8 12. Nc3 O-O 13. Be3 c6 14. Qc2 Bb4 15. Rad1 Qh4 16. Nb3 Qh5 17. a3 Bf5 18. Qd2 Nh4 19. Nd4 Bxc3 20. bxc3 Be6 21. c5 b6 22. Bg5 Nxg2 23. Rxe6 fxe6 24. Kxg2 bxc5 25. Nb3 Rf5 0-1 Navarro Torres,P-Frasquet/Spain 1985) 9... c6 (9... Kf8!?) 10. Re1 cxb5 (10... Ng6? 11. Nxc6! bxc6 12. Bxc6+ Bd7 13. Qxd5) 11. Rxe5 Nc7 12. Qe2 a6 13. Nd2 Be6 14. f4 (14. Ne4!? O-O 15. Bg5 Bxg5 16. Nxg5 Bd5 17. Qd3 g6 18. Qh3 h5 19. Rae1) 14... g6 15. Nxe6 fxe6 (15... Nxe6 16. f5) 16. Nf3 Bf6 17. Re4 O-O 18. Be3 Qd6 19. g3 Rad8 20. Bd4 Bxd4+ 21. Nxd4 Rfe8 22. Re1 Qc5 23. a3 Kf7 24. Qf2 Rd6 25. g4 Kg8 26. R1e3 Rf8 27. Rf3 Rd7 28. Nxe6 Rd1+ 29. Kg2 Qc6 30. Qc5 Rd2+ 31. Kg3 Nxe6 32. Qxc6 bxc6 33. Rxe6 Rxb2 34. Rxc6 Rb3 35. Rxa6 Rc8 36. Kh4 Rcxc3 37. Rxc3 Rxc3 38. Kg5 Rc4 39. Ra8+ Kf7 40. Ra7+ Kg8 41. h4 b4 42. Ra4 Rc5+ 43. Kh6 bxa3 44. Ra8+ Kf7 45. Rxa3 Rc4 46. Ra7+ Kf8 47. Kxh7 Rxf4 48. g5 Rxh4+ 49. Kxg6 Rg4 50. Ra8+ Ke7 51. Kh6 Kf7 52. Ra7+ Kf8 53. Kg6 Rg1 1-0 Tartakower,S-Reti,R/Berlin 1928

 

8. Qb3 Bxf3 9. Qxb7 Ndb4!

9... Nde7 10. gxf3 Na5 11. Qa6 Nxc4 12. Qxc4

 

10. cxb4 Rb8 11. Qa6 Rb6 12. Re1+ Be7 13. Qa4?!

13. Qa3 Bd5=

 

13... Rxb4 14. Qc2 Bd5 15. Bxd5 Qxd5 16. b3 O-O!

16... d3!? 17. Qd2 Rg4 18. f3 Qxf3 19. Ba3 Qf6

 

17. Ba3 d3! 18. Nc3 Qa5 19. Qb2 Bf6 20. Bxb4

20. Rac1 d2 21. Qxd2 Qxa3

 

20... Nxb4 21. Rac1 Nc2 22. b4 Qxb4 23. Qxb4 Nxb4 24. Red1 d2! 25. Rxd2 Bg5 26. Rdd1 Bxc1 27. Rxc1

And though Black has obvious winning chances, he took a draw.

1/2-1/2

Game 17: Ponziani

Zdenko Krnic (2430) - Victor Ciocaltea (2450) [C44]

Nis (6) 1981


1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. c3 Nge7 4. d4 exd4 5. cxd4 d5 6. e5

6. exd5 Nxd5 7. Bb5 Bb4+ 8. Bd2 Qe7+ 9. Qe2 Bxd2+ 10. Nbxd2 Qxe2+ 11. Kxe2 Nf4+!? (11... Bd7 12. Rhe1 O-O-O) 12. Kf1 O-O 13. g3?! (13. Bxc6! bxc6 14. h3 Rd8) 13... Bh3+ 14. Kg1 a6! 15. Bf1 (15. Bxc6?? Ne2#) 15... Bxf1 16. Kxf1 Nd3 17. Ne4 Rfe8 18. Nc5 Nxd4 19. Nxd3 Nxf3 20. Kg2 Ne5 21. Nxe5 Rxe5 22. Rhd1 Re7 23. Rd4 g6 24. Rc1 Kg7 25. Kf3 Rae8 26. Rc2 c6 27. Rcd2 Re6 28. Rd7 R8e7 29. b4 Kf6 30. Rd8 Rc7 31. Rb8 Ke7 32. a4 Rd6 33. Re2+ Re6 34. Rd2 Rf6+ 35. Kg4 h5+ 36. Kh4 Rd6 37. Re2+ Re6 38. Rb2 Kf6 39. f4 Re4 40. Kh3 Rd7 41. Kg2 h4 42. Kf3 Rc4 43. Rb3 Rc2 44. h3 hxg3 45. Kxg3 Rc4 46. b5 cxb5 47. axb5 axb5 48. Rxb5 Rd3+ 49. Kg4 Rcc3 50. Rb6+ Kg7 51. f5 Rc4+ White resigned as 52.Kg5 Rg3# follows. 0-1 Puljek Salai,Z-Olarasu,G/Katowice 1984

6. Nc3 dxe4 7. Nxe4 Nd5 8. Bb5 Bb4+ (8... Bf5!) 9. Bd2 O-O (9... Bd7) 10. Bxc6 bxc6 11. O-O Bg4 12. Qc2 f5 13. Neg5 Bxd2 14. Qxd2 f4 15. Rfe1 h6 16. Ne6 Qf6 17. Nxf8 1-0 Sharif,M-Farooqui,Z/Nice 1974

6... Bg4= 7. Nc3

a) 7. Nbd2 Qd7 8. h3 Be6 9. Nb3 Ng6 10. Bd2 Be7 11. Rc1 a6 12. Nc5 Bxc5 13. Rxc5 h6 14. Bd3 Bf5 15. Bxf5 Qxf5 16. O-O Nge7 17. Qb3 Qd7 18. Qxb7 O-O 19. Qb3 Rfb8 20. Qc2 Rb6 21. Rc1 Rab8 22. b3 R8b7 23. Qc3 Qf5 24. Qe3 Qe4 25. Qxe4 dxe4 26. d5 Nb4 27. Bxb4 exf3 28. d6 cxd6 29. exd6 Rxb4 30. Rc7 Rxc7 31. Rxc7 Kf8 32. dxe7+ Ke8 33. gxf3 Rb6 34. Kg2 Rg6+ 35. Kf1 Rf6 36. Ke2 Re6+ 37. Kd3 Rd6+ 38. Kc3 Rf6 39. Kb4 Rxf3 40. Ka5 Rxf2 41. a4 Rf6 42. Ra7 g5 43. Rxa6 Kxe7 1/2-1/2 Schormeyer,M-Geissler,G

b) 7. h3 Bxf3 8. gxf3 Nf5 9. Be3 Qh4 10. Bb5 Nxe3 11. Qc1 Nc4 12. b3 N4xe5 13. dxe5 Qb4+ 14. Nc3 d4 15. O-O dxc3 16. Bxc6+ bxc6 17. e6 Be7 18. exf7+ Kxf7 19. a3 Qd4 20. Rd1 Qf6 21. Qe3 Rhe8 22. Rac1 Bxa3 0-1 Zdebskaja,N-Shen Yang/Beijing CHN 2008

c) 7. Be3 Nf5 8. Be2 Bb4+! 9. Nc3 (9. Nbd2? Bxf3 10. Bxf3 Ncxd4) 9... O-O 10. O-O f6 (10... Nce7!? 11. Qb3 (11. Ng5 Nxe3 12. fxe3 Bxe2 13. Qxe2 h6 14. Nh3 c5 15. Nf4 Rc8) 11... c5 12. dxc5 Bxc3 13. bxc3 Nxe3 14. fxe3 Qc7) 11. exf6 Nxe3 12. fxe3 Rxf6 13. Qb3 Bxc3 14. bxc3 Kh8 White's preponderance of pawns in the center and pressure on d5 gives him an enduring edge.(Black might hold the balance with 14... Na5 15. Qc2 Qe7 16. Ne5 Bxe2 17. Qxe2 Nc6 18. Rxf6 Qxf6 19. Rf1 Qe6 20. Nd3 Re8 21. Nf4 Qe4 22. Qf3 Qxf3 23. Rxf3 Ne7=) 15. Rae1! (15. Qxb7? Rb8 16. Qa6 Nxd4) 15... Qe7 16. Bd3! (16. Qxd5? Qxe3+ 17. Kh1 Qxc3) 16... Bxf3 17. gxf3 Re6 18. e4 Rg6+ Typical of Moller to play for tactical complications. 19. Kh1 (19. Kf2?! Qh4+) 19... Qg5 20. Qc2 (20. Re2! and it appears White wins a pawn.) 20... Rf6 21. Qg2 Qxg2+ 22. Kxg2 Ne7 23. e5 Rf4 24. Kf2 Raf8 25. Ke3 g5 26. Re2 Nf5+ 27. Bxf5 R4xf5 28. Rg2 h6 29. h4 Kg7 30. hxg5 hxg5 31. Rg4 Kg6 32. f4 Rh8 33. Rxg5+ Rxg5 34. fxg5 Rh3+ 35. Rf3 Rxf3+ 36. Kxf3 Kxg5 37. Ke3 Kf5 38. Kd3 Ke6 39. Kc2 c6 40. Kb3 b6 41. a3 a6 42. Kb4 Kd7 43. Kb3 Ke6 44. Kc2 Kf5 45. Kd3 Ke6 46. Ke3 Kf5 47. Kf3 Kg5 48. Ke3 Kf5 49. Kd3 Ke6 1/2-1/2 Marco,G-Moller,J/Gothenburg 1920

7... Nf5 8. Be2 Qd7

a) 8... Bxf3 9. Bxf3 Nfxd4 10. Bxd5 Bb4 11. O-O Bxc3 12. Bxc6+ Nxc6 13. bxc3 Qxd1 14. Rxd1 Nxe5 15. Bf4=

b) 8... Be7 9. O-O O-O 10. Bf4 Kh8 11. Rc1 Bxf3 12. Bxf3 Ncxd4 13. Bxd5 Ne6 14. Qg4 g6 15. Bxe6 fxe6 16. Rfd1 Qe8 17. Ne4 Qa4 18. Re1 Rad8 19. Nf6 Rd4 20. g3 c6 21. Qh3 Bxf6 22. exf6 Rxf4 23. gxf4 Qxf4 24. Rc3 Rxf6 25. Qf3 0-1 Roth,L-Lach,B/MMWuert 9394 1994

9. O-O O-O-O 10. h3 Bxf3 11. Bxf3 Nfxd4 12. Bxd5 Bb4= 13. Be4 Nxe5 14. Nd5 Bc5 15. Be3 f5 16. Bxd4 fxe4 17. Bxe5 Qxd5 18. Qg4+ Qd7 19. Qxg7 Qxg7 20. Bxg7 Rhg8 21. Bc3 Rd3

Black has some play but not enough to gain a win.

22. Kh1 Rf8 23. Rae1 Rxf2 24. Rxf2 Bxf2 25. Rxe4 Bg3 26. Rd4 Re3 27. Kg1 h5 1/2-1/2


Game 18: Ponziani

Max Blau - Victor Ciocaltea [C44]

Varna ol (Men) qual-B/Varna (1) 1962


1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. c3 Nge7

An interesting way of playing against the Ponziani, which can transpose among multiple lines with an early c3 and d4.

 

4. d4 exd4 5. Nxd4?!

5. Bd3 d5 (5... dxc3!? 6. Nxc3 g6 7. e5 Bg7 8. Bf4 O-O) 6. O-O Bg4 7. h3 Bxf3 8. Qxf3 Ne5 9. Qe2 Nxd3 10. Qxd3 dxe4 11. Qxe4 Qd5 12. Qxd5 Nxd5 13. cxd4 O-O-O 14. a3 g6 15. Be3 Bg7 16. Nd2 f5 17. Nf3 Rhe8 18. Rfe1 Rd6 19. Bd2 Re4 20. Kf1 h6 21. Rxe4 fxe4 22. Ne5 Ne7 23. Bc3 Nd5 1-0 Hendriks,R-Langerak,D/Netherlands 1986 -- this game is recorded as a win for White but I suspect it actually ended in a draw.

 

 

5... Nxd4!?

Black has a number of options, including 5...g6.

 

6. Qxd4 Nc6 7. Qe3

7. Qd3 Bc5 (7... d6 8. Be2 g6!? 9. O-O Bg7) 8. Be2 O-O 9. O-O d6 10. Be3 Bxe3 11. Qxe3 f5 12. exf5 Bxf5 13. Nd2 Qf6 14. Bc4+ Kh8 15. Rae1 Ne5 16. f4 Nxc4 17. Nxc4 Qf7 18. b3 Rae8 19. Qd2 Qg6 20. Rxe8 Rxe8 21. Re1 Rxe1+ 22. Qxe1 Be4 23. Qd2 b6 24. Ne3 h6 25. Nd1 Bb7 26. Qe2 d5 27. g3 c5 28. Kf2 Bc6 29. Ne3 d4 30. cxd4 cxd4 31. Nc4 Bd5 1/2-1/2 Firnhaber,I-Leiber,B/Germany 1987.

 

7... Be7

7... g6!?

 

8. Bc4 O-O 9. O-O d6 10. Nd2 Kh8 11. Nf3 f5!

Steinitz showed that this is the way to trade off White's central pawn. Black soon gains an edge and parlays that into a winning position.

 

12. exf5 Bxf5 13. Be6 Qe8 14. Bxf5 Rxf5 15. Qe4 Qf7 16. c4 Rc5 17. b3 Bf6 18. Rb1 Re8 19. Qd3 b5 20. Be3 bxc4 21. bxc4 Rxc4 22. Rfc1 d5 23. Rxc4 dxc4 24. Qa3 Qd5 25. Qa4 Rd8 26. h3 h6 27. Rc1 c3 28. a3 a5 29. Kh2 Ne5 30. Nxe5 Bxe5+ 31. f4 Bf6 32. Qc2 Qd3 33. Qf2 Re8 34. Re1 Re4 35. Bc1 Bd4 36. Qf1 Qxf1 37. Rxf1 Re2 38. Kg3 c5 39. Kf3 Ra2 40. g4 Kg8 41. Ke4 Rh2 42. Kd5 Rxh3 43. Re1 Rh2 44. g5 Kf7 45. Kc4 hxg5 46. fxg5 Ra2 47. Kb3 Ra1 48. Kc2 a4 49. Rf1+ Ke6 50. Rf8 Kd5 51. Ra8 Ra2+ 52. Kd1 Rh2

0-1


Game 19: Spanish

Samuel Standidge Boden - Louis Paulsen [C60]

BCA-04.Kongress/Bristol (3.1) 1861


Louis Paulsen is probably best remembered today for having developed the Vienna fianchetto system (1.e4 e5 2.Nc3 Nf6 3.g3), which he first tried at Vienna 1873. Here he tries out an interesting fianchetto concept as Black which can be used to decline the d4 and c3 gambit. We will look at this more closely in the games that follow, but Paulsen's initial game with the line is worth examining. It would take over 100 years for this line to gain followers.

1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. Bb5 Nge7

The Cozio Defense, which often transposes to 3...g6 lines. This method of playing the fianchetto lines was advocated by Andy Soltis in his book "Beating the Ruy Lopez with the Fianchetto Variation." The variation we consider here could also arise, via our system, with 3... g6 4. d4 exd4 5. c3 Nge7 6. cxd4 (or 6. O-O Bg7 7. cxd4 d5) (6. Bg5!? Bg7 7. cxd4 will also be analyzed, as Black will be prevented from recapturing at d5 with the Knight) 6... d5 7. exd5 Nxd5 8. O-O Bg7 9. Bxc6+ bxc6 10. Re1+ Be6 and now 11. Bg5 Qd6 returns us to our main line.

 

4. O-O g6 5. c3 Bg7 6. d4 exd4 7. cxd4 d5 8. exd5 Nxd5 9. Re1+

a) 9. Bxc6+ bxc6 10. Bg5 Qd6 11. Re1+ Be6 is considered by some the most precise move order.

b) 9. Qe2+ Be6 10. Bxc6+ bxc6 11. Bg5 Qd6 is also played, but the Queen is not as well placed on the e-file as the Rook is after 9.Re1+ and Black has an easier time of achieving equal play.

 

9... Be6 10. Bxc6+

White can also "go pawn hunting" in various ways, and we will analyze: 10. Ng5, 10. Ne5

and 10. Qa4.

 

10... bxc6 11. Nc3

Though the Knight develops to a natural square, this move allows Black to exchange pieces, simplifying his defensive task.

11. Bg5 Qd6 (Black also has 11... Qb8!? -- which White can deny him by a different move order) 12. Nbd2 O-O 13. Ne4 (13. Nc4 has independent significance, though it is not as challenging in my view) 13... Qb4 14. Qc1 has become the standard method of handling the position, when Glenn Flear writes: "A complicated struggle is in prospect. What has weakened the Black pawn structure and has fine outposts for his knights on c5 and e5. On the other hand, Black has a firm grip on d5 (in front of the isolated d-pawn), the bishop pair and play on both the b-file and the long black diagonal." Basically, though White has more space and some initiative, the position is essentially balanced. That's why several strong players have taken up this line as their favorite approach to the Ruy Lopez.

 

11... O-O 12. h3










12... c5!?

If White is slow to take action, Black will generally have this useful pawn break, which also liquidates the doubled pawn.

Black can also choose a slower maneuvering game with 12... Re8 13. Ne4 Bf5 14. Nc5 Qd6=.

 

13. Be3?!










13. Ne4! c4! leads to a more complex version of the game continuation, which is better than the simplifying 13... cxd4 14. Nxd4 Nf4!? 15. Nxe6 Nxe6=.

 

13... c4!

Black's idea is to use the c-pawn to restrain the b-pawn so that he can put pressure on it along the b-file. Even if White manages to exchange his b-pawn for Black's c-pawn, he will be left with two isolated pawns on open files. But Black's attack on the b-pawn comes too fast for White to do anything about it.

 

14. Nxd5 Qxd5 15. Rc1 Rab8 16. Rc2 Rb5 17. a4?!

this move practically assists Black by leaving the b-pawn permanently backward.

 

17... Rb3 18. Ne5 Rb4

Paulsen refuses to get distracted from his plan. Of course, 18... c5!? is also good, but not 18... Bxe5?! 19. dxe5 Qxe5? 20. Bh6.

 

19. Rd2 Rfb8










White is positionally lost and therefore correctly tries to complicate matters.

 

20. Nc6! Qxc6 21. d5 Qxa4 22. dxe6 Qxd1!

Not 22... fxe6?? 23. Rd8+!

 

23. exf7+ Kxf7 24. Rexd1 Bxb2

White has secured some counterplay, but the passed c-pawn is destined to decide the game.

 

25. Rd7+ Kg8 26. Bxa7 Rc8 27. Re1 c3 28. Ree7 c2!

The pawn advances to the queening square while also opening the Bishop's diagonal to secure the g7 square.

 

29. Be3 Bc3 30. Rxh7 Rb1+ 31. Kh2 Re1!?

Threatening Rxe3 followed by c8=Q.

 

32. Bf4 c1=Q 33. Bxc1 Rxc1

Black is up a piece and has a second c-pawn to advance to the queening square. White's situation is hopeless, and Paulsen continues to play carefully to secure the point.

 

34. Rh6 Be5+ 35. g3 Rc6 36. Rh4 Rd6 37. Rhh7 Rxd7 38. Rxd7 c5 39. f4 Bg7 40. Rd2 c4 41. Rc2 c3 42. Kg2 Rd8 43. Kf3 Rd3+ 44. Kg4 Rd2 45. Rc1 c2 46. Kg5 Bb2 0-1


Game 20: Spanish

Nikolay Dmitrievich Grigoriev - Alexander Alekhine [C60]

URS-ch01/Moscow (1) 1920


1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. Bb5 Nge7

In our repertoire, the position after move 7 could arise if White chose to recapture the d-pawn with his Knight rather than his c-pawn following 3... g6 4. d4 exd4 5. c3 Nge7!? 6. Bg5 Bg7 7. Nxd4?! (7. cxd4 d5 8. exd5 Qxd5 is discussed in the next game).

 

4. d4 exd4 5. Nxd4 g6 6. Bg5?!

6. Be3 Bg7 7. Nc3 is the more natural development.

 

6... Bg7 7. c3

Alekhine notes that "This whole scheme is not to be recommended, since it takes away the best development square for the queen's knight."

 

7... h6! 8. Bh4

8. Be3 O-O 9. O-O d5=

 

8... O-O 9. O-O










9... Nxd4! 10. cxd4 c6 11. Bc4 g5 12. Bg3 d5!

Forcing the exchange of d-pawn for e-pawn, which will leave White's d-pawn isolated. Not 12... Qb6? 13. Bd6! Re8 14. Qf3.

 

13. exd5 Nxd5

Alekhine notes that "Black now stands very well and has chances to attack successfully the weakling on d4."

 

14. Be5!

Both defending the d-pawn and seeking to exchange off Black's powerful fianchetto Bishop. Black is better after 14. Nc3 Nb6 15. Bb3 Qxd4.

 

14... Be6 15. Nd2

15. Bxg7 Kxg7 16. Nd2 Nf4 17. Bxe6 Nxe6 18. Nb3.

 

15... f6! 16. Bg3 Qb6 17. Re1 Rfe8 18. Ne4 f5! 19. Nc5

19. Nd6 f4! 20. Nxe8 Rxe8 21. Qh5 Qd8!.

 

19... Bf7

"White is forced now to save his threatened bishop and first loses a pawn" -- Alekhine.

 

20. Bd6 Qxb2 21. Bxd5 Bxd5 22. Rb1?

"This counter action proves to be immediately destructive, since Black gets a mating attack. The game was lost for White in any case."

 

22... Qxd4 23. Rxb7 Qg4! 24. f3

White is lost in any event:

a) 24. Bg3 Qxd1 25. Rxd1 f4

b) 24. Qxg4?? Rxe1#

c) 24. Rxe8+? Rxe8 25. Qxg4 Re1#

 

24... Bd4+ 25. Kh1

 

 

 

25... Bxf3!

"On 26.Rxe8+ Rxe8 27.gxf3 mate follows in two moves," by 27...Re1+! 28.Qxe1 Qxf3#. This game marvelously demonstrates the latent power of Black's fianchetto Bishop.

0-1


Game 21: Spanish

Neboisa Illijin (2255) - Ivan Radulov (2200) [C60]

Biel MTO Open/Biel (4) 1989


1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. Bb5 g6 4. c3

In our system, the game position after move 8 would arise by 4. d4 exd4 5. c3 Nge7 6. Bg5 (6. cxd4 d5 7. exd5 Nxd5 8. O-O Bg7 9. Bxc6+ bxc6 10. Bg5 Qd6 11. Re1+ Be6 is the main line examined below) 6... Bg7 7. cxd4 d5 (7... O-O!? is also playable) 8. exd5 Qxd5.

 

4... Nge7 5. d4 exd4 6. cxd4

The alternate way of pursuing the plan in the game is 6. Bg5!? but this allows Black an alternative in 6... Bg7 7. cxd4 O-O!? (7... d5 8. exd5 Qxd5 transposes to the game) 8. Nc3 (8. d5 Bxb2) 8... h6 9. Bh4 (9. Bxe7 Nxe7 should be fine for Black, though things did not go well in the only available game: 10. O-O c6!? (10... d5! is probably more precise) 11. Be2 d5 12. e5 f6 13. Qd2 Bg4 This move leads to Black losing the advantage of the two bishops and therefore must not be best.(Perhaps 13... Nf5) (or 13... fxe5 14. Nxe5 Qd6) 14. exf6 Rxf6 15. Ne5 Bxe2?! 16. Nxe2 Qd6 17. Rae1 Nf5 18. Nf4 h5?! 19. Nh3 Bh6 20. f4 Re6 21. g4!? hxg4 22. Nxg4 Re4 23. Nxh6+ Nxh6 24. Ng5 Rxe1 25. Rxe1 Rf8?? (25... Qf6) 26. Re6! Qxf4 27. Rxg6+ Kh8 28. Rxh6+ Kg8 29. Rg6+ Kh8 30. Qe2 1-0 Weeks,M-Kulago,A/Hoogeveen open 2006) 9... g5 10. Bg3 d5 (10... f5! looks like one improvement) 11. exd5 Nxd5 12. O-O Bg4 13. Bxc6 bxc6 14. Rc1 Rb8 15. b3 Rb4 16. Nxd5 (16. Be5 Bxe5 17. dxe5 Nf4 18. Re1 (18. Qxd8 Rxd8 19. Rcd1 Re8) 18... Nd3 19. Ne4 f5! 20. exf6 Qd5) 16... Qxd5 17. Rc5 Qd7?! (17... Bxf3=) 18. Qd2 Rb5 19. Rxb5 (19. Ne5!) 19... cxb5 20. Ne5 1/2-1/2 Weeks,M-Vul,A/Hoogeveen Essent 2005.

 

6... d5 7. Bg5 Bg7

7... dxe4 8. Ne5 Qd6 9. Nc3!.

 

8. exd5 Qxd5










9. Nc3 Qd6

9... Qe6+?! does not look right, though Radulov got away with it after 10. Be3 (perhaps 10. Kf1! f6 11. d5) 10... O-O 11. O-O Nd5 12. Qe2 Nce7 13. Rfe1 c6 14. Bd3 Nxe3 15. fxe3 Nd5 16. Qf2 Qe7 17. Kh1 Bg4 18. h3 Be6 19. Bc2 Rad8 20. Qg3 (20. e4 Nb4) 20... Nf6 21. Qh4 Rfe8 22. Ng5 Nh5! 23. g4? Bh6 (23... Bf6!) 24. gxh5 (24. Nf3) 24... Bxg5 25. Qg3 Bh4 26. Qf4 Bxe1 0-1 Todorov,M-Radulov,I/Sunny Beach 2007 (55).

 

10. O-O

10. d5 Bxc3+ 11. bxc3 Qxd5.

 

10... O-O 11. Ne4

11. d5 Ne5 12. Ne4 Qb4 13. Nf6+ (13. Nxe5 Bxe5 14. Qa4 Qxa4 15. Bxa4 Nf5 16. Nf6+ Kh8 17. Rfe1 1/2-1/2 Geller,E-Radulov,I/Palma de Mallorca 1989) 13... Bxf6 14. Bxf6 Ng4 15. Bxe7 Qxe7 16. Rc1 Qd6 1/2-1/2 Dobrev,I-Radulov,I/Bankia 1991.

 

11... Qb4 12. a4 Nd5! 13. Re1

Better is 13. Bxc6 bxc6 14. Qc1 though Black can then choose among several moves that seem to improve upon the position in the main lines that we consider in later games, e.g.: 14... Bg4!? (14... Bf5) (14... Re8) (14... Rb8!? 15. Qxc6 Qxb2 16. Qxd5 Bb7) 15. Qxc6 (15. Ne5? Bxe5) 15... Bxf3 16. gxf3 Qxd4 17. Rfd1 Nb4 18. Qxc7 Qxb2 19. Rab1 Qe2.

 

13... Bg4!

Now White's d-pawn will fall.

 

14. Bd2

14. Bxc6 bxc6 15. h3 Bxf3 16. Qxf3 Qxd4.

 

14... Qxb2 15. Rb1 Bxf3! 16. Qxf3 Qxd4 17. Rbd1 Qb6! 18. Ng5 Rad8 19. Qh3 h6 20. Ne4 Nd4!? 21. Bxh6 Qe6 22. Qd3?!










The tactics work against White after this, but 22. Qxe6 Nxe6 leaves Black up a pawn and headed toward the endgame.

 

22... Nb4! 23. Qb1 Bxh6 24. Qxb4 Nc2! 25. Qc3 Nxe1 26. Rxe1 Bd2! 27. Qa1 Bxe1 28. Nf6+ Kh8 29. Nd7+ f6 0-1


Game 22: Spanish

Tibor Berta (2190) - Ivan Radulov (2405) [C60]

Agneaux St Lo op 02nd/Agneaux 1998


1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. Bb5 g6 4. O-O Bg7 5. c3 Nge7 6. d4 exd4 7. cxd4 d5 8. e5










As in the Svenonius lines considered above, this advance seems to favor Black who now has targets of attack in White's static pawn chain.

 

8... O-O

8... Bg4 seems premature but worked in a recent game: 9. Bg5 (9. h3!?) 9... Qd7 10. Nbd2 a6 11. Bxc6 Nxc6 12. h3 Bf5 13. Nb3 b6 14. Rc1 a5 15. Bf6! O-O 16. Rc3 a4 17. Nbd2 (17. Bxg7!) 17... Bxf6 18. exf6 Qd6 19. g4 Bd7 20. Ne5? Nxe5 21. dxe5 Qxe5 22. Qf3 Rfe8 23. Re3 Qg5 24. Rfe1 h5! 25. Kh2 Rxe3 26. Rxe3 hxg4 27. hxg4 Bxg4 28. Qg3 Qxf6 29. Kg1 Bf5 30. Nf3 a3 31. bxa3 Be4 32. Ne5 Re8 33. f4 Kg7 34. a4 Rh8 35. Rc3 c5 36. a5 bxa5 37. Rxc5 Qb6 38. Qc3 Qb1+ 39. Kf2 Rh2+ 40. Ke3 Qg1# 0-1 Orkhan Abdulov-Deep Sengupta/Gaziantep 2008 .

 

9. h3

9. Bg5 h6 10. Bh4 g5 11. Bg3 Bg4 12. Nc3 Nf5 13. Bxc6 bxc6 14. Na4 Nxg3! 15. fxg3 f6 16. Qc2 Bxf3 17. Rxf3 fxe5 18. Rxf8+ Qxf8 19. Qxc6 exd4 20. Rf1 Qe8! 21. Qxd5+ Kh8 and Black simply has a winning pawn position, which he retained into the endgame: 22. Nc5 Qe3+ 23. Kh1 Rf8 24. Qc4 Re8 25. Qd3 Qe2 26. Kg1 Qxb2 27. h4 Qe2 28. Qg6 Qe3+ 29. Kh2 gxh4 30. Rf3 Qe5 31. Nd3 Qe6 32. Qxe6 hxg3+ 33. Kxg3 Rxe6 34. Kf2 Rc6 0-1 Hatzimanolis,A-Radulov,I/Ikaria 1997.

 

9... h6

It's often a good idea to deny White the use of g5 for a Bishop or Knight, though immediate attack with ...f6 is also possible:

9... f6 10. exf6 (10. Re1 fxe5 (10... a6) 11. dxe5 Rxf3!? (a thematic Exchange sac, though a bit risky here) 12. Qxf3 Nd4 13. Qd3 c5 14. g4?! (14. Na3 a6 15. Ba4) 14... a6 15. Ba4 b5 16. Bd1 Nec6 17. Bf4 Nb4 18. Qc3 Qf8 19. Bg3 Bh6 20. Nd2? Nbc2 21. Bxc2 Bxd2 22. Qd3 (22. Qxd2 Nf3+) 22... Bxe1 23. Rxe1 Be6 24. Bd1 Nc6 25. a3 (25. f4) 25... c4 26. Qd2 d4 27. f4 Qc5 28. Bf3 (28. f5!? c3!) 28... Bd5 29. Bxd5+ Qxd5 30. f5 Qf3 31. Kh2 c3 32. bxc3 dxc3 33. Qe3 Qxe3 34. Rxe3 c2 35. Rc3 Nd4 36. fxg6 hxg6 37. Kg2 a5 38. Bf2 b4 39. axb4? (39. Rc5! seems to win the c-pawn without giving the Black Rook activity) 39... axb4 40. Rc4 Ra2 Now the Rook can defend the advanced pawn and force a queen 41. Kg3 c1=Q 0-1 Pichler,P-Rumpf,W/Vienna open 2003) 10... Rxf6 11. Be3 Qd6 12. Nc3 Be6 13. Ne5 Nf5!? (13... a6) 14. Bg5 Ncxd4! 15. Bxf6 Bxf6 16. Ng4 Bg7 17. Bd3 Nh4 18. Be2 Rf8 and Black had an overwhelming attacking position for the Exchange: 19. g3 Nhf3+ 20. Kg2 h5 21. Bxf3 Nxf3 22. Nh2 Ng5 23. g4 d4 24. Ne2 Be5 25. h4 Bd5+ 26. f3 Nxf3! 27. Nxf3 hxg4 28. Neg1 gxf3+ 29. Rxf3 Bh2! 30. Kf1 Bxf3 31. Nxf3 Qg3 0-1 Liangov,P-Georgiev,K/Primorsko 1989.

 

10. b3 f6! 11. exf6 Rxf6 12. Bb2 Rf4!

Putting pressure on the critical d4 pawn -- and the d4 square.

 

13. Ne5 Nxe5 14. dxe5 Be6 15. Re1 c6 16. Bf1 Qb6! 17. Qd2 Raf8

Black's kingside attack already appears overwhelming.

 

18. Re2 h5!?

With ideas like Bh6 and g5-g4. Grabbing central squares with 18... c5 is also strong.

 

19. g3 Rf3 20. Bg2










20... Rxg3! 21. Bd4 Rxg2+

Denuding White's King. Now Black's pieces easily infiltrate on the light squares.

 

22. Kxg2 c5 23. Bb2 d4!

Opening the long diagonal for a light-square attack.

 

24. Qd1 Qc6+ 25. Kh2 Rf3 26. Qf1 Rxh3+ 27. Qxh3 Bxh3 28. Kxh3 Qf3+

0-1


Game 23: Spanish

Zsuzsa Veroci (2225) - Alexandra Nicolau (2290) [C60]

Skopje ol (Women) fin-A/Skopje (4) 1972


1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. Bb5 Nge7 4. c3 g6 5. d4 exd4 6. cxd4 d5 7. exd5 Nxd5 8. O-O Bg7 9. Re1+ Be6 10. Ne5










Piling up on the Knight at c6 wins a pawn, but Black gets compensation. Another way of winning a pawn is

10. Qa4 O-O! 11. Bxc6 bxc6 12. Qxc6 Nb4! (thematic) 13. Qc3?! (13. Qa4! Nd3 (13... c5!?) 14. Rd1 Nxc1 15. Rxc1 Bd5 16. Nbd2 c6 and Black's two bishops alone compensate for the pawn) 13... c5!? (13... Nxa2! 14. Qc5 Nxc1) 14. Bg5! (14. Qxc5? Nd3) 14... Bxd4?! (14... Qd6) 15. Bxd8 Bxc3 16. bxc3 Nc2 17. Bf6 Nxa1 18. Na3 Nb3 19. axb3 Bxb3 20. Nd2 and White simply had the advantage of two pieces vs. Rook and pawn but went on to lose in 0-1 Yurkov,A-Alaev,P/Kharkov 2004 (57).

 

10... O-O!

10... Qd6?! defending the pawn is just too passive: 11. Nd2 O-O 12. Ne4 Qb4 13. Bxc6 bxc6 14. Nxc6 Qb6 15. Ne5 f6 16. Nc4 Qb5 17. b3 Rfe8 18. Bb2 Nb6 19. Ncd2 f5 20. Nc5 Bd5 21. Nf3 Rxe1+ 22. Nxe1 Nd7 23. Rc1 Nxc5 24. dxc5 Qc6 25. Bxg7 Kxg7 26. Qd4+ Kg8 27. f3 Rd8 28. Nd3 Qa8 29. Qe3 Re8 30. Ne5 c6 31. Qd4 Qb7 32. Nd3 Qe7 33. Re1 Qxe1+ 34. Nxe1 Rxe1+ 35. Kf2 Rc1 36. Qd2 Rxc5 37. a4 Kf7 38. Kg3 a5 39. Qe3 Rc2 40. Qa7+ Kf6 41. Qxa5 g5 42. Qd8+ Kg6 43. h4 f4+ 1-0 Smyslov,V-De Greif,B/Cienfuegos 1973.

 

11. Bxc6!

Glenn Flear in "Offbeat Spanish" considers this move a critical test of the variation, though it has rarely been played. The more common pawn grab is to take first with the Knight:

11. Nxc6 bxc6 12. Bxc6 Rb8 13. Nc3 Nb4 14. Be4 (14. d5!? Bf5! 15. Ba4 Nd3 16. Re2 Nxb2 17. Bxb2 Rxb2 18. Rxb2 Bxc3 19. Rab1 Bxb1 (19... Bxb2! 20. Rxb2 Be4 21. Bc6 Qg5 22. g3 Rd8 23. Rb4 Qf5) 20. Rxb1 Ba5 21. Bc6 Qf6 22. Qe2 Rd8 23. g3 Bb6 24. Kg2 Rd6 25. Rb4 Bd4 26. Rb3 Qd8 27. Rb4 Qf6 28. f3 Kg7 29. Qd3 Bb6 30. Re4 Qb2+ 31. Qe2 1/2-1/2 Lazarus,B-Vul,A/Gibraltar open 2008) 14... Bxd4 15. Qe2 (15. Bf4 Qf6 16. Be3 Rfd8 (16... c5! is more thematic) 17. Bxd4 Rxd4 18. Qe2 Bc4 19. Qe3 Bd3 20. Rac1 Rbd8 21. a3 Na2 22. Nxa2 Rxe4 23. Qxa7 Qxb2 24. Qxc7 Rde8 25. Rxe4 Bxe4 26. Nb4 Qxa3 27. Qc3 Qa8 28. f3 Bb7 29. Nc6 Bxc6 30. Qxc6 Qa7+ 31. Kh1 Qe3 32. h3 Rd8 33. Qc7 Qg5 34. Re1 Rd2 35. Qb8+ Kg7 36. Qe5+ Qxe5 1/2-1/2 Das,A-Venkatesh,M/Nagpur IND 2008) 15... Re8 16. Be3 c5! 17. Qf3 f5 18. Bc6 Nxc6 19. Qxc6 Bf7 20. Bxd4 cxd4 21. Nb5 Rxe1+ 22. Rxe1 Qa5! 23. Re5 a6 24. Qd6 Rxb5 25. Re2 Rb7 26. Re5 Qc7 0-1 Angelov,A-Radulov,I/Burgas 1991.

 

11... bxc6 12. Nxc6

Black still gets great play on the light squares if White declines the pawn: 12. Nd2 Ne7 13. Qa4 Bd5 14. Nb3 Nf5 15. Bf4 Re8 16. Rad1 Nh4! 17. f3 Qf6 18. Bg3










18... Nxg2!! 19. Kxg2 Rxe5 20. Nd2 Rxe1 21. Rxe1 Qf5 22. Qb4 g5 23. Qc3 g4 24. Kf2 Rc8 25. Qe3 h5 26. h3 Kh7 27. Ne4 Kg6 28. h4 Re8 0-1 Rozentalis,E-Sokolov,I/Groningen 1993.

 

12... Qd6










13. Ne5 Rfd8!?

13... c5! is the "book" move, when play might go 14. Nc3 (14. Na3?! Nb4 1/2-1/2 Garcia Gonzalez - de Greiff, Cienfuegos 1973) 14... cxd4 (14... Nb4?! 15. a3!) 15. Qxd4 Rfd8 16. Nxd5 Qxd5 17. Qxd5 Rxd5 18. Bf4 g5! 19. Bg3 Rd2= "and Black has adequare play for his pawn" says Flear.

 

14. Nd2 Nb6?!

After this, I think most players would doubt Black's compensation.

Better is de Greiff's idea 14... Nb4! 15. a3 (15. Ndf3 Nxa2) (15. Qa4!? Qxd4 16. Re4!? seems very artificial, and I like Black after 16... Qd6 17. Nxf7 Bxf7 18. Qxb4 Qxb4! 19. Rxb4 c5 20. Rb5 c4!) 15... Nc6 16. Nxc6 Qxc6 17. Nf3 Bg4

 

15. Ndf3 Bd5 16. Bf4 Qb4 17. b3 Bb7 18. Rc1

18. Nd3!? Bxf3 (18... Qb5 19. Be5 seems an obvious improvement on the game line.) 19. Qxf3 Qxd4 20. Rad1 Qd5

 

18... Nd5 19. Bg3 Re8 20. Qc2 Bh6 21. Nd3 Qb6 22. Rcd1 Rad8 23. a3 Bg7 24. Be5 Bf8 25. Nc5 Bc8 26. h3 a5 27. Qc4 Bh6 28. Re4 Bf5 29. Rh4 Bf8 30. g4! Bc8 31. g5 Bf5 32. Re1 Qc6 33. Nh2!? Nb6??










33... Be7! 34. f4 h5 is a neat way to keep the h-file closed for now.

 

34. Qc3?

Likely in time pressure, White misses 34. Rxh7! Kxh7 35. Qxf7+ Bg7 36. Qxg7#

 

34... Rd5 35. Qg3 Bg7 36. f4 Rxd4! 37. Bxg7 Kxg7 38. Na4? Rde4

Suddenly Black has gone from lost to winning. Even stronger was 38... Rd3!

 

39. Rxe4 Rxe4 40. Qc3+ Qxc3 41. Nxc3 Re3 42. Nb5 Nd5 43. Nd4 c5 44. Nxf5+ gxf5 45. Rh6 f6! 46. Rh5 Nxf4 47. gxf6+ Kxf6 48. Rxh7 Rxb3 49. h4 c4 50. Rc7 c3 51. a4 Rb2 52. Nf3 c2 53. Rc6+ Ke7 54. Ne1 c1=Q 0-1


Game 24: Spanish

Line Jin Jorgensen (1851) - Alexander Kulago (2146) [C60]

Arctic Chess Challenge/Tromsoe (3) 2007


1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. Bb5 Nge7 4. c3 g6 5. O-O Bg7 6. d4 exd4 7. cxd4 d5 8. exd5 Nxd5 9. Re1+ Be6 10. Bxc6+

10. Ng5 O-O! (10... Qd6 11. Nxe6 fxe6 12. Qg4 O-O 13. Bxc6 (13. Rxe6 Qb4) 13... Qxc6 14. Qxe6+ Qxe6 15. Rxe6 Bxd4 Soltis) 11. Nxe6 fxe6 12. Bxc6 (12. Be3? Nxe3 13. fxe3 Nxd4!!) 12... bxc6 transposes back to the game line.

 

10... bxc6 11. Ng5 O-O!










As usual, Black simply castles and gets fine compensation for the pawn. 11... Qf6?! does not look as good, though it worked in one game: 12. Qe2?! (12. Nxe6 fxe6 13. Nd2 O-O 14. Nf3 must be the critical test) 12... O-O 13. Nc3 Bd7 14. Nxd5 cxd5 15. Be3 Rfe8 16. Qd2 Bg4 17. h3 Bf5 18. Rac1 Rac8 19. Qd1 Rxe3 20. fxe3 Qxg5 21. Qf3 Be4 22. Qf2 Bf8 23. Rf1 f5 24. Qf4 Qxg2# 0-1 Kasparova,T-Kojovic,D/Obrenovac open 2008.

 

12. Nxe6 fxe6 13. Nc3

a) 13. Rxe6 Qh4! 14. Qe2 Bxd4 15. Be3 Nf4 (15... Nxe3! 16. fxe3? Bxb2) 16. Bxf4 Qxf4 (16... Rxf4!) 17. Nc3 Qxf2+ 18. Qxf2 Rxf2 19. Re4 Bb6 20. Na4 Rxb2+ 21. Kh1 Rd2 22. h3 Rf8 23. Rc1 Rxa2 24. Nxb6 cxb6 25. Rxc6 Rf7 26. Rc8+ Kg7 27. Kh2 Rb7 28. h4 b5 29. Ree8 b4 30. Rg8+ Kh6 31. Kh3 b3 32. Rb8 Rxb8 33. Rxb8 b2 34. Rb7 g5 35. g4 gxh4 36. Kxh4 Kg6 37. Rb5 a5 38. Rb6+ Kf7 39. Rb7+ Ke6 0-1 Dykun,O-Alaev,P/Kiev 2003

b) 13. Nd2!? Bxd4 (13... Rxf2?! looks too ambitious) 14. Nf3 Bg7

 

13... Qf6

13... Qh4!? 14. Ne4 h6

13... c5!?

 

14. Qe2 Qxd4 15. Qxe6+ Kh8 16. Be3 Nxe3 17. Rxe3 Qb4!

Black has good targets for his dark squared Bishop.

 

18. Rb1?! Bd4! 19. a3 Qc5 20. Rh3?

20. Re2 Bxf2+ 21. Kh1 Bd4

 

20... Rxf2

20... Bxc3! wins a piece due to the threat of Qxf2+ and Qf1+ mating.

 

21. Kh1 Raf8 22. g4 Bxc3

22... Rf1+! 23. Rxf1 Rxf1+ 24. Kg2 Rg1+ 25. Kf3 Qf8+ 26. Ke2 Qf1+ 27. Kd2 Bxc3+ 28. Kxc3 Qxh3+

 

23. Rxc3 Qd4 24. Rxc6 Rf1+

24... Qf4!

 

25. Rxf1 Rxf1+ 26. Kg2 Rf2+ 27. Kh3 Rf3+ 28. Kh4 Qd8+

28... Qf2+

0-1


Game 25: Spanish

Jan H Timman - Boris V Spassky [C60]

Bugojno (7) 1986


1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. Bb5 Nge7 4. O-O g6 5. c3 Bg7 6. d4 exd4 7. cxd4 d5 8. exd5 Nxd5 9. Bg5 Qd6 10. Qe2+










Though this move is popular, it is probably not as strong as Re1+ since the Queen can play a more active role on other squares.

 

10... Be6 11. Nbd2

11. Nc3 Nxc3 ( it's not clear if exchanging or playing normally with 11... O-O 12. Ne4 Qb4 13. Bxc6 bxc6 is better) 12. bxc3 O-O (as usual, the exchange of pieces eases Black's task -- though it also makes it more difficult to get active play) 13. Qd2 Na5 14. Rfe1 c6 15. Bf1 Rfe8 16. Bf4 Qa3 (16... Qd5) 17. Be5 Bxe5?! (17... f6) 18. dxe5 Rad8 19. Qe3 (19. Qh6! Qf8 20. Qh4 Bd5 21. Ng5 h6 22. Ne4) 19... Bd5 20. Ng5 f6 21. Ne4 Bxe4 22. Qxe4 Qxc3 23. e6 Rd4 was a messy game in 0-1 Pedersen,T-Radulov,I/Burgas 1991 (47).

 

11... O-O 12. Ne4 Qb4 13. a3 Qa5 14. Bxc6 bxc6 15. Ne5 Rae8

15... Rfe8 16. Rac1 (16. Qf3 f6 17. Bd2 Qb5 18. Nd3 Bg4 19. Qxg4 Qxd3 20. Rfe1 f5 0-1 Bosch,J-Dreev,A/Arnhem 1989) 16... Qb5 17. Qxb5 cxb5 18. Bd2 f6 19. Nf3 Rad8 20. Rfe1 Bg4 21. Rc5 Bxf3 22. gxf3 f5 23. Rxd5 Rxd5 24. Nf6+ Bxf6 25. Rxe8+ Kf7 26. Rc8 Rd7 27. Bc3 Ke6 28. d5+ Kf7 29. Bxf6 Kxf6 30. Ra8 Ke5 31. Rxa7 Kxd5 32. Kf1 Re7 33. b3 Kc5 34. a4 Kb6 35. Ra8 bxa4 36. Rxa4 c5 37. Rh4 Kb5 38. Ra4 Rb7 39. Rc4 Kc6 40. Rc3 Rb4 41. Rd3 Rh4 42. Kg2 Kb5 43. Rd8 Rb4 44. Rb8+ Kc6 45. Rc8+ Kd5 46. Rd8+ Ke5 47. Rd3 Rd4 48. Re3+ Kd6 49. Re8 Kc6 50. Rc8+ Kb6 51. Rb8+ Kc7 52. Rb5 Kc6 53. Rb8 Rd1 54. Rc8+ Kb6 55. Rb8+ Kc7 56. Rh8 Rd7 57. Kg3 Kc6 58. Kf4 Kd5 59. Ke3 Rb7 60. Rd8+ Ke6 61. Rd3 g5 62. f4 g4 63. f3 h5 64. Kf2 h4 65. Kg2 Rb4 66. Re3+ Kd6 67. fxg4 fxg4 68. f5 Kd5 69. f6 Rf4 1/2-1/2 Ciocaltea,V-Sanz Alonso,F/Montilla 1978.

 

16. Rac1 f6 17. Nxc6 Qb6 18. Bd2 Bd7 19. Nb4 Qxd4

19... Bb5 20. Nxd5 Bxe2! 21. Nxb6 Rxe4 (21... Bxf1)

 

20. Rc4 Qe5 21. Nd3

21. f4 Qe6!

 

21... Qe7 22. Qf3 Bb5 23. Rd4 c6 24. Ng3 Qd8 25. a4 Ba6 26. Nb4 Qb6! 27. Rxd5!? cxd5 28. Nxa6 Qxa6 29. Qxd5+ Qe6 30. Qxe6+ Rxe6

Perhaps Timman hoped to set up a difficult endgame with Bc3 and a5, as we have seen. But there was too much material on the board for that to work.

 

31. Rc1 f5 32. b4 f4 33. Nf1 Bd4 34. Rc4 Re4 35. Kh1 Rfe8 36. h3 Bxf2 37. Rc6 Re1 38. Bxe1 Rxe1 39. g4 f3 40. Rc8+ Kf7 0-1


Game 26: Spanish

Kjell Arne Mork (2283) - Geir Sune Tallaksen (2233) [C60]

Norway Team Championship Final/Langesund (1) 2001


1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. Bb5 Nge7 4. O-O g6 5. c3 Bg7 6. d4 exd4 7. cxd4 d5 8. exd5 Nxd5 9. Bg5

9. Re1+ Be6 10. Ne5 O-O 11. Bxc6 bxc6 12. Nc3 c5! 13. Qf3 Nxc3 (13... cxd4!) 14. bxc3 cxd4 15. Nc6 Qd7 16. Nxd4 Bd5 17. Qg3 Rfe8 18. Rxe8+ Rxe8 19. Be3 c5 20. Nb3 Bxb3 21. axb3 Bxc3 22. Rc1 Bb2 23. Rf1 Bd4 24. Rd1 Qe6 25. h3 Qxb3 0-1 Bessenay,M-De Greiff,B/Nice olympiad final 1974

9... Qd6 10. Re1+ Be6 11. Nbd2 O-O 12. Nc4!?










Theory considers this an important alternative to the standard 12.Ne4, but it is not as strong since the Knight blocks the c-file and foregoes the c5 outpost, allowing Black to play his thematic ...c5 break with relative ease.

 

12... Qb4 13. a4

13. Bxc6 bxc6 14. Qc1 c5 (14... Rfe8 15. Bd2 Qb5 16. a4 Qa6 17. Nce5 Ne7 18. Ra3 Bd5 19. Bh6 Bh8 20. h3 Nf5= 1/2-1/2 Fercec,N-Stevic,H/Zadar CRO 2005 (52)) 15. Bd2 Qb5 16. a4 Qb7 17. dxc5 Rab8 18. Nfe5 Nb4 19. Ra3 Qd5 20. Bxb4 Rxb4 21. b3 Bxe5 22. Rxe5?










(22. Nxe5 Rxb3=) 22... Rxc4! 23. bxc4 Qxe5 24. Re3 Qxc5 25. h3 Rd8 0-1 Greeff,M-Mona,K/Windhoek 2007 (41).

 

13... a6

13... Rfe8

 

14. Bd2 Qe7 15. Bxc6 bxc6 16. Rc1

16. Nfe5 c5 17. dxc5 Qxc5 18. Rc1 Qe7 19. Na5 Rfe8 20. Nac6 Qd6 21. Ba5 Ne7 22. Qc2 Nxc6 23. Nxc6 Bd5 (23... Bf5!) 24. Nb4 c6 25. Rxe8+ Rxe8 26. Qd2 Qe5 27. Nxc6 Bxc6 28. Rxc6 Bh6 29. Qc3 Qd5 30. h3 Bd2 31. Qxd2 Qxc6 32. Bc3 f6 33. a5 Qe6 34. Qd4 Kf7 35. Qa7+ Re7 36. Qb8 Kg7 37. Bb4 Rf7 38. Bc3 and though up the Exchange, Black could see no way to break through White's fortress in 1/2-1/2 Posokhov,D-Alaev,P/Kiev 2004.

 

16... c5 17. Bg5 f6! 18. dxc5 fxg5 19. Qxd5 Rae8

19... Bxd5 20. Rxe7 Rac8

 

20. Qd2

20. Qc6? g4 21. Nfd2 Qf7 22. Rf1 Bd5 23. Qxa6 Ra8 24. Qb5 Rfb8

 

20... Qxc5

Black has recovered his pawn and his two bishops are coming to the fore -- already with the threat of Bxc4.

21. Nce5 Qd6 22. Qxg5 Bd5 23. Qg3?

23. Rcd1! Rf5 24. Qd2 Bb3 25. Ng4 Rd8 26. Qxd6 cxd6 27. Rd3 Bxa4

 

23... Bh6!

Black wins material with the twin threats of Bxc1 and Bf4xe5.

 

24. Ng4 Bxc1 25. Rxc1 Qxg3 26. hxg3 c6 27. Ne3 Rb8! 28. Ne5 Rxb2 29. f3 Ra2 30. Nxd5 cxd5 31. Nd7 Rd8 32. Rc7 Kf7 33. Nc5+ Ke8 34. Ne6 Rd7 35. Rc8+ Kf7 36. Ng5+ Kf6 37. f4 d4 38. Rc6+ Ke7 39. Re6+ Kf8 40. Rxa6 d3 41. Rf6+ Kg7

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Game 27: Spanish

Patrick Gideon Wolff (2585) - Ivan Sokolov (2610) [C60]

Biel Interzonal/Biel, Switzerland (6) 1993


1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. Bb5 Nge7 4. O-O g6 5. c3 Bg7 6. d4 exd4 7. cxd4 d5 8. exd5 Nxd5 9. Bxc6+

9. Bg5 Qd6 10. Re1+ Be6 11. Nc3 Nxc3!? ( With the Knight at c3, Black can exchange and ease his defensive task. But 11... O-O 12. Ne4 Qb4 13. Bxc6 bxc6 transposes to the main line and is probably best.) 12. bxc3 O-O 13. Qd2 Na5 14. Bh6 Nc4 15. Bxc4 Bxc4 16. Bxg7 Kxg7 17. Ne5 Be6 18. Re3 Rad8 19. Qb2 Qb6 20. Qa3 Rd5 21. Nc4 Qb5 22. Nd2 Qa5 23. Qe7 Rd7 24. Qh4 Bd5 25. Qf4 c5! 26. Rh3 f6 27. c4 Be6 28. Nb3 Qc7 29. Qh6+ (29. Nxc5 Bxh3) 29... Kg8 30. Nxc5? (30. Re3 Bxc4 31. dxc5 Rd5!) 30... Bxh3 31. Qxh3 Re7 32. Ne6 Rfe8 0-1 Khomulo,V-Shiliaev,V/USSR 1987.

 

9... bxc6 10. Bg5 Qd6 11. Re1+

This check develops the Rook and forces Black's Bishop to a less-than-ideal square at e6.

Less challenging is 11. Nbd2 O-O 12. Ne4 Qb4 13. Qc1 Bf5! 14. Re1 Rae8! 15. Bd2 Qb6 16. Nc5 Rxe1+ 17. Bxe1 Re8 18. h3 h5 19. a4 Re2 20. Bd2 Qb8 21. b3 Qe8 1/2-1/2 Grant,A-Vul,A/Hastings 2006.

 

11... Be6 12. Nbd2 O-O 13. Ne4

13. Rc1!? Qb4 14. Nb3 Qa4 15. a3 Bg4!? (15... Rab8) 16. h3 Bxf3 17. Qxf3 Rfb8 18. Nc5 Qxd4 19. b4 Re8 20. Nb3 Qb2 21. Na5 h6 22. Nxc6 Rxe1+ 23. Rxe1 Qc3 24. Qxc3 Bxc3 25. Rd1 Nxb4!? 26. axb4 hxg5 27. Rd7 a5 28. bxa5 1/2-1/2 Boudy,J-Radulov,I/Sofia 1990.

 

13... Qb4 14. Qc1

14. b3 Bg4 15. a3 Bxf3! 16. Qxf3 Qxd4 17. Rad1 Qb6 18. Nf6+ Nxf6 19. Bxf6 Bxf6 20. Qxf6 Qxb3 21. h4?! (21. Qxc6) 21... Rae8 22. Qxc6 Rxe1+ 23. Rxe1 Qxa3 24. Qxc7 a5 25. Re5 Ra8 26. h5 a4 27. Rc5 Qa1+ 28. Kh2 Qf6 29. Kg3 gxh5 30. f4 Kh8 31. Rxh5 a3 32. Ra5 Rg8+ 33. Kf3 Qg7 34. Rg5 Qf8 35. Qc3+ f6 36. Rd5 Qg7 0-1 Fucak,E-Stevic,H/Sibenik CRO 2009.

 

14... Rfe8

a) 14... Rab8 15. b3 Rfe8 16. Qxc6 Qb6 17. Qc1 Bg4 Wittmann,W-Defize,A Debrecen EUtch 1992

b) 14... Qb6 15. Bh6 Rfe8 16. Bxg7 Kxg7 17. Nc5 Jansa,V-Schwarzkopf,C Badenweiler Open 1990

c) 14... Bf5 15. Qxc6 Bxe4 16. Rxe4 Qxb2 17. Ree1 Nc3 18. Be7 Rfe8 19. Bc5 Ne4










20. Nd2! Qxd2 21. Rxe4 Red8 22. Rae1 h5 23. a4 Qc2 24. g3 a5 25. Re8+?! Rxe8 26. Rxe8+ Rxe8 27. Qxe8+ Kh7 28. Qxf7 Qxa4 29. Qxc7 Qa1+ 30. Kg2 a4 31. Qa7 Qd1 32. h4 Qb3 33. Kg1 Qb1+ 34. Kg2 Qe4+ 35. Kg1 Qe1+ 1/2-1/2 Sion Castro,M-Sokolov,I/Leon 1995.

 

15. h3










In the next game, we look at the more forcing 15.Bd2.

15... Rab8!

a) 15... Bxd4?! weakens the dark squares too much: 16. Nxd4 Qxd4 17. Qxc6 Qb6 18. Qc4 f5 19. Nc5 Bf7 20. Nd3 a5 21. Qh4 Rxe1+ 22. Rxe1 Re8 23. Rd1 Re4 24. Qg3 Qd6 25. Qf3 Rd4 26. Rc1 Nb4 27. Nf4 Kg7 28. Qg3 Nd3 29. Nxd3 Rxd3 30. Bf4 Qd5 31. Qh4 Rd1+ 32. Rxd1 Qxd1+ 33. Kh2 Qd5 34. Bxc7 Qe4 35. f4 Bd5 36. Be5+ Kg8 37. Qd8+ Kf7 38. Qd7+ Kf8 39. Bd6+ 1-0 Anagnostopoulos,D-Radulov,I/Athens 1997

b) 15... Qb6!? Sokolov 16. Nc5 Khalifman

 

16. b3 Bf5 17. Bd2

17. Nc5 Rxe1+ 18. Qxe1 Bxd4 19. Na6! Qxe1+ 20. Rxe1 Rb6 21. Nxd4 Rxa6 22. Nxf5 gxf5 23. Bh6 f6= and despite his structural weaknesses, Black ought to be able to hold onto equality with his pawn advantage.

 

17... Qb6

a) 17... Qf8 seems too passive: 18. Ng3 (18. Nc5 Rxe1+ 19. Qxe1 Re8 20. Qf1 Bc8 21. Rc1 Qd6 22. Re1 Rxe1 23. Qxe1 Qe7 24. Qxe7 Nxe7 25. Kf1 f6 26. Ne1 Nd5 27. Nc2 Bf8 28. Ke2 Kf7 29. Na3 Nb6 30. Bf4 Bd6 31. Bd2 g5 32. Nc4 Nxc4 33. bxc4 Bxc5 34. dxc5 1/2-1/2 Van den Doel,E-Stevic,H/Kusadasi TUR 2006) 18... Rxe1+ 19. Bxe1 Bd7 20. Ne5 Qe8 (20... Qd6? 21. Ne4) 21. Qc5 Bxe5 22. dxe5 Qxe5 23. Rd1 Ra8?! (23... Re8!? 24. Qxa7 (24. Ba5 h5 25. Re1 Qb2 26. Rxe8+ Bxe8) 24... h5) 24. Ba5 Be8?! (24... h5!? 25. Re1 Qd6 26. Qxd6 cxd6 27. Ne4 Re8 28. Nxd6 Rxe1+ 29. Bxe1 Kf8) 25. Re1 Qd6 26. Qxd6 cxd6 27. Ne4 Bd7 28. Nxd6 h5 29. h4 Be6 30. Re4 (30. f3!?) (30. Rc1 Ne7) 30... Rb8 (30... Ne7 31. Rb4!) 31. Rc4 Bd7 (31... Ne7 32. Rc5 Bd5 33. Bd2) 32. f3 Kf8 33. Kf2 Ke7 34. Ne4 f6 35. Bd2 Rb7 36. Ra4 Rc7 37. Ra5 (37. Be3 Nxe3 (37... c5?? 38. Rxa7) 38. Kxe3 Bf5) 37... Bc8 38. Be3 Nxe3 (38... a6 39. Bc5+) 39. Kxe3 Bf5 40. Ng3 Be6 (40... Bb1 41. Ne2) 41. Ne4 Bf5 42. Nc5 Kd6 43. Kd4 Re7 44. b4 Bb1 (44... Re2 45. g3 (45. Rxa7 Rd2+ 46. Ke3 Rxg2 47. a4 Rh2 48. a5 Rxh4 49. Rb7 Bc8!) 45... Rg2 (45... Rd2+ 46. Ke3 Rg2 47. Kf4) 46. Rxa7 Rxg3 47. Rd7+! Bxd7 48. Ne4+ Kc7 49. Nxg3) 45. a4 g5 (45... Re2? 46. Rxa7) 46. hxg5 fxg5 47. Ra6 Rc7 48. b5 h4 49. a5! Bf5 50. b6 axb6 51. axb6 Rc8 52. b7 Rb8 53. Ra8 1-0 Tseshkovsky,V-Dreev,A/Moscow 1992

b) 17... Qb5!? 18. Nc5 Rbd8 19. Ne5 h5 20. Qa3 Bf8 21. Rac1 f6 22. Nf3 Rxe1+ 23. Rxe1 Bxc5 24. Qxc5 Qxc5 25. dxc5 Kf7 26. Nd4 Bd7 27. Re4 Re8 28. f3 Ne7 29. Kf2 Nf5 30. Nxf5 Bxf5 31. Ra4 Bd3! 32. Be3 a6 33. h4 Re5 34. Rb4 Bb5 35. a4 Bd3 36. Rb7 Re7 37. Bf4 Ke6 38. g4 hxg4 39. fxg4 Kd5 40. b4 Re4 41. Kg3 Be2 42. Rb8 g5 43. hxg5 fxg5 1/2-1/2 Kristensen,S-Ponomarev,A/Russia 2000.

 

18. Nc5 h5 19. Ne5 Rbd8 20. Qa3 Re7 21. Rac1 Rde8

Khalifman notes that "White parried the opponent's tactical threats and fixed the weak points in Black's position, yet Black's defensive resources are still big enough."

 

22. Qb2 Qb5

22... f6!? Flear

 

23. a4 Qb6 24. b4 f6 25. Nc4 Rxe1+ 26. Bxe1 Qb8 27. Na5 Nf4 28. Rd1 Qd8 29. Qb3+

 

 

 

29... Kh7?

29... Qd5! 30. Qxd5+ cxd5=

 

30. Nxc6

After this Black struggles to make a draw.

 

30... Qd6 31. d5 Nxd5 32. Bc3 Qxc6 33. Qxd5 Qxd5 34. Rxd5 Re2 35. Na6 Rc2 36. Rc5 Bd7 37. Bxf6 Bxa4 38. Bxg7 Kxg7 39. Nxc7 Rxc5 40. Ne6+ Kf6 41. Nxc5 Bc6 42. f4 Ke7 43. Kf2 Kd6 44. Nd3 Be4 45. Ne5 Kd5 46. g4 hxg4 47. hxg4 g5 48. Ke3 Bh7 49. b5 gxf4+ 50. Kxf4 Kc5 51. Nc6 a6 52. bxa6

1/2-1/2


Game 28: Spanish

Raymond Kaufman (2230) - Arkadi Eremeevich Vul (2396) [C60]

Budapest FS06 IM/Budapest (6) 2006


1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. Bb5 g6 4. c3 Nge7 5. d4 exd4 6. cxd4 d5 7. exd5 Nxd5 8. O-O Bg7 9. Bg5

The move order 9. Re1+ Be6 10. Bxc6+ bxc6 11. Bg5 allows Black the alternative 11... Qb8!? but there is not a lot of practice with this move to suggest it is any better than 11...Qd6. In the only game I found, White did not play the best move with 12. Qd2!? (12. Qc1 O-O 13. Bh6 (13. b3 Re8) 13... Bxh6 14. Qxh6 Qxb2 15. Nbd2 Nf6! Wolff) 12... h6! 13. Bh4 O-O 14. Ne5!? c5! 15. Nc3 (15. dxc5 Qb4 16. Qxb4 Nxb4) 15... Nxc3 (15... cxd4?! 16. Nxd5 Bxd5 17. Nd7) (15... Re8!?) 16. bxc3 cxd4 17. cxd4 Qb6 18. Rac1 Rfe8 19. Nc6 Bd7 (19... Kh7!?) 20. Ne5 Be6 21. h3 Bd5 22. a4 a5 23. Rb1 Qa7 24. Qc3?! (24. Bg3) 24... c6 25. Bg3 Rac8 26. Qd2 Re6?! (26... Rcd8) 27. Rec1 Rd8 (27... Be4!?) 28. Re1 Rde8 29. Qc3 Kh7 30. Kh2 Bf8 (30... h5!?) 31. Ng4 and though Black was doing well he went on to lose in 1-0 Wolff,P-Dreev,A/ New York 1990 (60). Wolff suggests 31... Rxe1! 32. Rxe1 Rxe1 33. Qxe1 Bg7 34. Be5 h5 35. Bxg7 hxg4! 36. Bf6 Qc7+=

 

9... Qd6 10. Re1+ Be6 11. Nbd2 O-O 12. Ne4 Qb4 13. Bxc6 bxc6 14. Qc1 Rfe8 15. Bd2










This move appears to have become the main line. Two alternative plans are:

a) 15. Bh6 Bf5 (15... Bh8!?) 16. Bxg7 (16. Bd2 Qb6 17. Nc5 Rxe1+ 18. Bxe1 Re8 19. h3 Qb5= 1/2-1/2 Luther,T-Radulov,I/France 2005 (37)) 16... Bxe4 17. a3 Qb6 18. Rxe4! Rxe4 19. Be5 f6 20. Qc2 fxe5?! (20... f5 21. Ng5 Rg4) 21. Qxe4 Qxb2 22. Re1 Qxa3 23. dxe5 Rb8 24. Qg4 Qe7 25. h3 Rf8 26. Qc4 Qe6 27. Re4 Qf5 28. Kh2 Kg7 29. Nd4 Qd7 30. Nxc6 Nb6 31. Qc2 Qd5 32. f4 g5 33. fxg5 Re8 34. Rh4 Qg8 35. Nd4 Nd5 36. e6 Kh8 37. g6 Qf8 38. Qe4 Qd6+ 39. g3 Nf6 1-0 Velimirovic,D-Radulov,I/Palma de Mallorca 1989.

 

b) 15. a3 Qb5 (15... Qb6 16. Nc5 Bg4 17. Ne5 Bf5 18. Bh4 a5 19. b3 Qb5 20. Ra2 f6 21. Nc4 a4 22. Ne3 Nxe3 23. fxe3 axb3 24. Rf2 Bh6 25. Bxf6 Rab8 26. d5 cxd5 27. Bb2 Qc4 28. Qxc4 dxc4 29. e4 Rb5 30. Na4 Ra5 31. Rfe2 Bg4 32. Nc3 Bxe2 33. Rxe2 Bg7 34. Rd2 Bxc3 35. Bxc3 Rxa3 36. Rd7 Ra2 37. Rg7+ Kf8 38. Rxc7 b2 0-1 Orak,L-Stevic,H/Bizovac CRO 2007) 16. Nc5 (16. Bh6 Bh8 17. Ne5 f6 18. Nf3 Bg4 19. Nfd2 Bf5 20. Qc2 Re7 21. f3 Rae8 22. Rec1 Bd7 23. Nc5 Bc8 24. Qd3 g5 25. Qxb5 cxb5 26. h4 Nf4 27. Kh1 Re2 28. Nde4 f5! 29. Nxg5 Bxd4 30. Rab1 Rxb2 31. Rxb2 Bxb2 32. Rd1 Bxa3 33. Nd7 Nh5 34. g4 fxg4 35. fxg4 Bd6 36. gxh5 Bxd7 37. Rf1 Bc6+ 38. Kg1 Bc5+ 39. Kh2 Re2+ 40. Kg3 Bd6+ 0-1 O'Donnell,T-D'Amore,C/Moscow olympiad 1994) 16... Bf5! 17. b4 Rxe1+ 18. Qxe1 Bg4 (18... a5 19. bxa5!) 19. Ne5 Re8 20. Qd2 Bf5 21. Bh6 f6 22. Bxg7 Kxg7 23. Ned3 Qc4 24. Nf4 Qc3 25. Qxc3 Nxc3 26. h3 g5 27. Nh5+ Kf7 28. Ng3 Bg6 and Black held the endgame: 29. Rc1 Nb5 30. Na6 h5 31. d5 h4 32. Nf1 Nd4 33. Kh2 Re2 34. Rd1 Nb5 35. dxc6 Rxf2 36. Kg1 Rc2 37. Rd7+ Ke6 38. a4 Nc3 39. Nxc7+ Ke5 40. Re7+ Kd6 41. Rg7 Ne2+ 42. Kh2 Be4 43. Ne8+ Ke6 44. Nc7+ Kd6 45. Ne8+ 1/2-1/2 Emms,J-Georgiev,K/Cappelle la Grande 1992.

 

15... Qb6 16. Nc5 Bf5 17. Ne5 Rad8

17... Re7?! 18. Nb3! Bxe5 19. dxe5 Rae8 20. Na5 c5 21. b3 Bd3?! (21... Nb4 22. Nc4 Qc6 23. Bxb4 cxb4 24. Qe3 Oll) 22. Nc4 Qe6?! (22... Bxc4?! 23. Qxc4 Rxe5 24. Rxe5 Rxe5 25. f4 Ne3 26. Qc3 c4 27. fxe5 Nd1+ 28. Be3 Nxe3 29. bxc4) (22... Qa6) (22... Qc6) 23. Nb2 1-0 Oll,L-Dreev,A/Odessa 1989 (46).

 

18. a4

a) 18. a3 Nf6 (18... f6 19. Nc4 Rxe1+ 20. Qxe1 Qb5 21. Rc1 Bf8) 19. Qc4 Rf8 20. b4 Ne4 21. Bc3 Bxe5 22. dxe5 Nxc5 23. bxc5 Qb5 24. Qh4 Be6 25. Rac1 Rd3 26. a4 Qb3 27. Ba5 Rc8 28. h3 Qd5 29. Re4 h6 30. Rb4 Kh7 31. Qf6 Bxh3 32. gxh3 Rxh3 33. Re4 1/2-1/2 Donchev,D-Radulov,I/Sofia 1991

b) 18. Nc4 Rxe1+ 19. Bxe1 Qb8 20. Ne5 Re8 21. Nxc6 Qb5 22. Ne5 Bxe5 23. dxe5 Rxe5 24. Nb3 Re2? (24... Re4=) 25. Nd4 Qxb2 26. Nxe2 Qxe2 27. Qc5 Be4 28. Bb4 Nxb4 29. Qxb4 Bd5 30. Re1 Qxa2 31. Re8+ Kg7 32. Qf8+ Kf6 33. Qh8+ Kg5 34. Re5+ 1-0 Azarov,S-Stevic,H/Warsaw POL 2005

c) 18. Nb3 Bxe5?! (18... f6!?) 19. dxe5 Nb4 20. Bxb4 Qxb4 21. Qxc6 a5 22. Qxc7 a4 23. Qc5 Rb8 24. Qxb4 Rxb4 25. Nc5 Rc8 26. Rac1 Rxb2 27. Nxa4 Rxc1 28. Rxc1 Rxa2 29. Nc3 Ra5 30. f4 h6 31. Kf2 g5 32. Ke3 Kg7 33. h3 f6 34. g4 gxf4+ 35. Kxf4 Bg6 36. e6 Re5 37. Ra1 Rxe6 38. Ra7+ Bf7 39. Ne4 Rb6 40. Rd7 Kf8 41. Rc7 h5 42. gxh5 Rb4 43. Kf5 Be6+ 44. Kxe6 Rxe4+ 45. Kxf6 Kg8 46. h6 Re8 1/2-1/2 Gallagher,J-Tallaksen,G/Gausdal NOR 2001 .

 

18... Nb4

a) 18... Bxe5 19. dxe5 Nb4 20. a5 Qb5 21. Bxb4 Qxb4 22. Ra4 Qd2 23. g4 Qxc1 24. Rxc1 Bc8 25. f4 Kg7 26. Ne4 Ba6 27. Nf6 Rf8 28. Ra3 Bb5 29. g5 Rh8 30. Rh3 Rd4 31. Rh4 h5 32. gxh6+ Rxh6 33. Ne8+ Kh7 34. Nf6+ Kg7 35. Ne8+ Kh7 36. Nf6+ Kg7 1/2-1/2 Fowler,S-Vul,A/Hastings 2006

b) 18... Nf6 19. Ra3 Be6 20. Bg5 Rb8 21. Bxf6 Bxf6 22. Ned7 Bxd7 23. Nxd7 Bg5 24. Rae3 Bxe3 25. fxe3 Qb4 26. Rf1 Qxa4 27. d5 Qb3 28. e4 cxd5 29. exd5 Rbd8 30. Nf6+ Kg7 31. Nxe8+ Rxe8 32. Qxc7 Qxd5 33. Qxa7 Re2 34. Rf2 Re1+ 35. Rf1 Rxf1+ 36. Kxf1 Qd1+ 37. Kf2 Qd2+ 38. Kf3 Qxb2 39. h3 h5 40. Qe3 Qf6+ 41. Kg3 g5 42. Qe4 Kh6 43. h4 gxh4+ 44. Qxh4 Qg5+ 45. Kh3 Qxh4+ 46. Kxh4 f5 47. g3 Kg6 48. Kh3 Kg5 49. Kh2 Kf6 50. Kh3 Kg5 51. Kh2 h4 52. Kh3 1/2-1/2 Zifroni,D-Berkovich,M/Israel tt 1997.

 

19. Bxb4 Bxe5 20. Bc3 Bg7 21. Qf4 h5

21... Qb8 22. g4 Bc2 23. h3 h6 24. Rac1 Bb3 25. Nxb3 Qxb3 26. a5 Qb8 27. Re4 Rxe4 28. Qxe4 Rd6 29. Re1 Re6 30. Qb1 Qe8 31. Rxe6 Qxe6 32. Qf1 h5 33. gxh5 gxh5 34. Qg2 Qg6 35. Kh2 Qd6+ 36. Qg3 a6 37. Qxd6 cxd6 38. d5 Bxc3 39. bxc3 cxd5










40. Kg3 Kg7 41. Kf4 Kf6 42. h4 Kg6 43. Ke3 Kf5 44. Kd4 Ke6 45. f3! f6 46. f4 Kf5 47. Kxd5 Kxf4 48. c4 f5 49. Kxd6 Kg3 50. c5 f4 51. c6 f3 52. c7 f2 53. c8=Q f1=Q 54. Qc3+ Kxh4 55. Kc7 Qe2 56. Kb7 Qb5+ 57. Ka7 Kg5 58. Qg7+ Kf5 59. Qh6 Qe2 60. Qf8+ Kg4 61. Qc8+ Kf4 62. Qxa6 Qxa6+ 63. Kxa6 h4 64. Kb7 h3 65. a6 h2 66. a7 h1=Q+ 67. Kb8 Qh8+ 1/2-1/2 Lind,J-Vul,A/Stockholm SWE 2009.

 

22. h3 Qb8 23. g4 hxg4 24. hxg4 Bd7 25. Rxe8+ Bxe8 26. Re1 Qc8 27. Re7 Rd6 28. Qe4

28. Qe3 Kf8 29. Re4 f5 30. gxf5 gxf5 31. Re6 Bf7

 

28... Kf8 29. g5

29. Nb7! Re6 30. Rxe6 Qxe6 31. Qxe6 fxe6 32. Nc5

 

29... Qd8 30. Re5 Bxe5 31. Qxe5 f6 32. Qh2 Qe7 33. Qh8+ Kf7 34. d5 cxd5?

34... Rxd5 35. Qh7+ Kf8 36. Qh8+= and White only draws.

 

35. gxf6 Rxf6 36. Qh7+ Kf8

 










37. Qh6+?

37. Ne6+!! Qxe6 (37... Rxe6 38. Qh8+ Kf7 39. Qg7#) 38. Bb4+ Qd6 39. Bxd6+

 

37... Kf7 38. Qg5? Rf5 39. Qh6 Qxc5 40. Qg7+ Ke6 41. Qg8+ Kd7

a most fortunate win for Black. White's attack should have yielded at least a draw.

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