King's Indian Defense, Fianchetto Variation

Gallagher and Other Approaches

Donald Carrelli - Michael Goeller [E69]

Casual Correspondence/Chess.com (1) 2010


Kenilworth Chess Club president Don Carrelli and I played a casual correspondence game at Chess.com over the past couple of months. Since FM Steve Stoyko's lecture on the KID, we have both been interested in learning more about the opening, so the choice of what to play was natural enough. What to play against Carrelli's favorite fianchetto variation was more difficult.

1. d4 Nf6 2. c4 g6 3. g3 Bg7 4. Bg2 d6 5. Nc3 O-O 6. Nf3 Nbd7










The "Classical" approach, heading toward the Gallagher Variation, which is advocated by Joe Gallagher in Play the King's Indian (Everyman 2004) and by Graham Burgess in The King's Indian for the Attacking Player (1993). Since those books were published, there have been some developments in the line. After my experience in the present game (despite the result) I am searching for a safer alternative. Two that I considered are:

 

a) 6... Nc6 is the Panno Variation, which is advocated by Victor Bologan, Eduard Gufeld, and others. It's a respectable continuation and the first I learned, but I was looking to try something new.

 

b) 6... c6 is the line I looked at most at this juncture, influenced by the following Joel Benjamin game, by Andrew Martin's King's Indian Battle Plans, and by Stoyko's note in his lecture materials that it is "very solid and recommended by Portisch," e.g.: 7. O-O

(The immediate 7. e4 can be met by trying to fight White on the light squares with 7... a6 (with the standard idea of b5, to chip away at White's control of d5; but an interesting alternativeis 7... Qa5 8. O-O Qh5!? which Stoyko calls "the Kavalek Variation," with Black playing directly on the kingside for Bh3 and likely to force queens off after 9. Ng5) 8. O-O b5 9. e5 Ne8 10. Qe2 bxc4 11. Qxc4 Be6 12. Qa4 Nc7 13. Re1 h6 14. exd6 exd6 15. Bf4 g5! 16. Bc1 Qd7 17. h4 f6 (17... g4!?) 18. Be3 Nd5 19. Nxd5 Bxd5 20. hxg5 fxg5 21. Nd2 Bxg2 (the triumph of Black's strategy in this line usually involves trading off White's fianchetto Bishop) 22. Kxg2 Ra7 23. Rac1 Qf5 24. Qc4+ Raf7 25. b3 Re8 26. Nf1 h5 27. Nh2 Re6 28. Kg1 d5 29. Qf1 Re4 30. Rcd1 Rfe7 31. Kh1 Bf6 32. Rd3 R4e6 33. Red1 Nd7 34. Qg2 g4! 35. Kg1 Nf8 36. Rc3 Nh7 37. Rdc1 Bg5 (37... Ng5!) 38. Nf1 Qf6 39. Bf4 Bxf4 40. gxf4 Qxf4 41. Rxc6 Ng5! 42. Rxe6 Nf3+ 43. Kh1 Rxe6 44. Ne3 Qxd4 45. Qg3 Qe5 46. Qxe5 Rxe5 47. Rc5 d4 48. Rxe5 Nxe5 49. Nf5 d3 50. Kg2 d2 51. Ne3 h4 52. b4 Kf7 53. a4 Ke6 54. b5 axb5 55. axb5 Kd6 0-1 Vladimir Liavdansky-Alexey Suetin/Tallinn (Estonia) 1965 (55))

 

7... Bf5! (a standard idea in the Panno Variation also)

 

8. b3

(8. Nd2 Qc8! 9. e4 (9. Qb3 b6) 9... Bh3 10. Nf3 Bxg2 11. Kxg2 Na6 12. Re1 Nc7 13. Qd3 Ne6 14. h3 Nd7 15. Be3 c5 16. Nd5 Re8 17. Rac1 b6 (17... cxd4) 18. b3 Qb7 19. Rcd1 a6 20. dxc5 Ndxc5 21. Qc2 b5 22. Nd4 Rac8 23. cxb5 axb5 24. Qb1 Nc7 25. Nf3 Nxd5 26. exd5 Nd7 27. Bd4 Nf6 28. Bxf6 Bxf6 29. a4 Rc5 30. Qe4 Ra8 31. Re3 bxa4 32. bxa4 Raa5 33. Red3 Qa6 34. Ra3 Rc4 35. Qb1 Raxa4 36. Qb8+ Kg7 37. Rxa4 Rxa4 38. Rd2 Ra1 39. Nh2 Qa5 40. Nf3 Qa6 41. Nh2 0-1 Miguel A Quinteros-Eugenio Torre/3, Buenos Aires Clarin ARG 1978 (41))

 

8... Ne4

(Black's strategy revolves around fighting for the light squares, including by exchanging off pieces that control those squares)

 

9. Bb2 Nxc3 10. Bxc3 Be4! (Who owns the long diagonal?) 11. Qd2 e6!? 12. Qe3 d5 13. Bh3 Bxf3! (13... f5? 14. Ng5) 14. Qxf3 f5 (Black's light-square strategy is complete, with a sort of Stonewall control of light squares, having traded off the light squared Bishop) 15. Qd3 Nd7 16. f3 a5!? 17. Kh1 Qg5 18. Bg2 Qh5 19. Qe3 Rfe8 20. Qd3 Nf6 21. e4 dxe4 22. fxe4 Rad8! 23. Rad1 c5! 24. Bf3 fxe4 25. Bxe4 Ng4! 26. Qe2 Rf8 27. Bf3 Rxf3! 28. Rxf3 Nxh2 29. Kg2 (29. g4 Nxg4+ 30. Kg1 Nh2 31. Rf2 Qxe2 32. Rxe2 Nf3+ 33. Kg2 Nxd4 34. Bxd4? e5) 29... Qxf3+ 30. Qxf3 Nxf3 31. Kxf3 b6! (there is no hurry to pick up the d-pawn, which is doubly pinned, so Black has time to defend the a-pawn) 32. Ke4 cxd4 (32... Bxd4) 33. Rd3 e5 34. c5 bxc5 35. Bxa5 Ra8 36. Bb6 Rxa2 37. Bxc5 Re2+ 38. Kf3 Re1 39. Kf2 Rc1 40. b4 e4 41. Ra3 e3+ 42. Ke2 Rc2+ 43. Ke1 Be5 44. Ra8+ Kf7 45. Rf8+ Ke6 46. Re8+ Kd5 0-1, Schroer - Benjamin, US Chess League 2009.

 

7. O-O

Black is not annoyed by 7. d5 Nb6! 8. Nd2

(8. Qd3 Bd7 9. O-O c6 10. Bf4 Rc8 11. Rad1 cxd5 12. cxd5 Nc4 13. Bc1 Qc7 14. b3 Nb6 15. Bb2 Bf5 16. e4 Nxe4 17. Nxe4 Bxb2 18. Rfe1 Nd7 19. Qe3 Rfe8 20. Rb1 Bg7 21. Rbc1 Qa5 22. Nc3?? Rxc3 23. Rxc3 Qxc3 24. Qxa7 Ne5 25. Qe3 Nxf3+ 26. Bxf3 Qxe3 27. Rxe3 Bh3 28. b4 Rc8 29. Re1 Rc2 30. a4 Bd4 31. Re2 Rc1+ 0-1 Di Renzo,A-Lo Perfido,N/Asiag 1993 (31))

 

8... Nfd7

(also reasonable is 8... Bd7 9. O-O c6 10. e4 e6 ( if Black fears the potential passed d-pawn, he could play instead 10... cxd5 11. cxd5 Rc8 12. h3 e6=) 11. a4 a5 12. Re1 Qc7 13. c5 dxc5 14. d6 Qd8 15. Nb3 c4 16. Nc5 e5 17. Bg5 h6 18. Nxb7 Qb8 19. Bxf6 Bxf6 20. Nc5 Rd8 21. b3 Be8 22. bxc4 Rxd6 23. Qb3 Nd7 24. Rab1 Qa7 25. Nxd7 Bxd7 26. Nd1 Rd4 1/2-1/2 Uhlmann,W-Vogt,L/Stralsund 1975 (58))

 

9. Qc2

(9. e4?! Nc5 10. Nb3 Nxc4 11. Nxc5 dxc5 1/2-1/2 Bill Paschall-Joel Benjamin/Seattle USA 2002 (57))

 

9... Ne5 10. b3 c6 11. Bb2 cxd5 12. cxd5 Bd7 13. h3 (13. f4?! Ng4) 13... f5 14. f4 Nf7 15. Nf3 Rc8 16. Qd2 Bxc3 17. Bxc3 Nxd5 18. Bb2 Nf6 19. Ng5 Qb6 20. Bxf6 exf6 21. Nxf7 Kxf7 22. Qd5+ Ke7!? 23. Qxb7 Qc5 24. Qd5 Qb4+ 25. Qd2= 1/2-1/2 De Castro,E-Jauregui Andrade,C/Tel Aviv 1964 (44).

 

7... e5 8. e4

White also often plays 8. h3 which basically transposes, e.g.: 8... exd4 9. Nxd4 a6 10. e4 Rb8 11. a4!? (one way to prevent b5) 11... Re8 12. Be3 Ne5 13. b3 Nc6 14. Ra2 (14. f4!? Bd7) 14... Bd7 15. Rd2 Qc8 16. Kh2 (16. g4 h5!?) 16... Re5!? 17. f4 Re8 (17... Rh5 18. f5!) 18. f5 gxf5 19. Rdf2 Re5 20. Nxc6?! (20. Nxf5! Bxf5 21. Rxf5 Rxf5 22. Rxf5) 20... bxc6 21. Bd4 Re8 22. exf5 Qd8 (22... c5!) 23. Rf4 (23. c5!) 23... c5 24. Bxf6 Bxf6 25. Nd5 Re5!? 26. Qh5 c6 27. Nc3 (27. Nxf6+ Qxf6 28. Rh4 Rxb3 29. Qxh7+ Kf8 30. Rh6 Qg7 31. Qxg7+ Kxg7 32. Rxd6 Bxf5 33. Rxc6 Bd3 34. Rf2 Bxc4) 27... Qe7 28. Ne4 d5 29. Rg4+ Kh8 30. Nxf6 Qxf6 31. Rh4 Bxf5 32. Qxh7+! Bxh7 33. Rxf6 Kg7 34. Rxc6 d4! (Black's passed pawn is a real threat, especially with White's Rooks so deep into enemy lines and unable to protect the last rank). 35. Rg4+ Bg6 36. Rd6 Rxb3 37. Bf1 (37. h4 Rb2) 37... Re1 38. Rf4 Rb2+ 39. Kg1 Bd3 40. Rdf6 Bxc4 41. R6f5 Rbb1 0-1 Kruttika Nadig-Le Vajda/Heviz HUN 2010 (41).

 

8... exd4 9. Nxd4 Re8 10. h3

10. b3 c6 (is the traditional method of playing the Classical, as discussed by Steve Stoyko in his lecture; the Gallagher approach might go instead 10... a6!? 11. Bb2 Rb8 12. Qd2 c5 13. Nc2 b5) 11. Bb2 Qb6 12. Qd2 Nc5 13. Rfe1 a5 14. Rab1 a4 (Bronstein played a very similar game against Pachman with this same line) 15. Ba1 axb3 16. axb3 Ng4 17. h3 Rxa1 18. Rxa1 Nxf2!! 19. Re3 Nxh3+ 20. Kh2 Nf2! 21. Rf3 Ncxe4 22. Qf4 Ng4+ 23. Kh1 f5 24. Nxe4 Rxe4 25. Qxd6 Rxd4 26. Qb8 Rd8 27. Ra8 Be5 28. Qa7 Qb4 29. Qg1 Qf8 30. Bh3 Qh6 0-1 Frantisek Zita-David Bronstein/Prague (Czech Republic) 1946 (30).

 

10... a6!?

Gallagher's move, with the idea of developing queenside play with Rb8, Ne5, c5 and b5.

 

11. Be3

11. Re1 Rb8 12. Bg5 (12. a4 Ne5 13. b3 Bd7 14. Be3 (14. f4!? Nc6 15. Be3 Nxd4 16. Bxd4 c5 17. Bxf6 (17. Bf2 Ng4) 17... Bxf6 18. Rc1 Bd4+ 19. Kh2 Bc6 20. Nd5 b5) 14... Qc8 15. Kh2 h5 16. Ra2 h4 17. gxh4 c5 18. Nde2 Bxh3!! 19. Bxh3 Nf3+ 20. Kg3 (20. Kg2 Nxh4+ 21. Kg3 Nh5+= 22. Kxh4?? Bf6+) 20... Nh5+ 21. Kg2 Nxh4+ 22. Kh2 Nf3+ 23. Kg2 Nh4+= 1/2-1/2 Anatoli Karpov-J Arizmendi-Martinez/Manises ESP 2001 (23)) 12... h6 13. Be3 Ne5 14. b3 c5 15. Nde2 b5 16. cxb5 (16. f4 Ned7 17. Qxd6 b4) 16... axb5 17. Nf4 b4 18. Ncd5 Nxd5 19. Nxd5 Ba6 20. Rb1 Qa5 21. Qd2 Kh7 22. f4 Nd3! 23. Red1 c4 24. bxc4?! Bxc4 25. Qc2? Qxa2 26. Qd2 Qxd2 27. Bxd2 Ba2 28. Rxb4 Nxb4 29. Nxb4 Bc4 30. Rc1 Rec8 31. e5 dxe5 32. Nc6 Rb2 33. Rxc4 Rxd2 34. fxe5 Ra8 35. Rc1 Raa2 36. Bf3 Bf8 37. Be4 Ba3 38. Rb1 Bc5+ 0-1 Estrada Martinez,C-Mark Paragua/Seville ESP 2002 (38).

 

11... Rb8

Black's pieces and pawns are well positions for dynamic combat.

 

12. b3

Gallagher writes that "It seems that this set-up ... casts doubt on the immediate ...c5 and ...b5 advance and a few players have mentioned to me that this is the refutation of the Gallagher variation." He suggests now 12...Qe7 to avoid dropping the d-pawn for insufficient compensation after 12...c5 13. Nde2 b5?! (better Qc7, but that backward d-pawn is not pretty) 14.Qxd6 with a clear edge for White. I was not satisfied by any of the plans offered in the books, but I did find some interesting recent games that suggest a way for Black.

12. a4 Ne5 13. b3 Bd7 14. a5 (14. Re1 c5 15. Nde2 Bc6 16. Qc2 b5 17. cxb5 axb5 18. axb5 Bxb5 19. Nxb5 Rxb5 20. f4 1/2-1/2 Andras Adorjan-Attila Groszpeter/Budapest (Hungary) 1991 (20)) 14... Qc8 15. Kh2 h5 16. Nd5 (16. f4 Nfg4+) 16... h4 17. gxh4 Nxd5 18. cxd5 c5 19. dxc6 bxc6 20. Ne2 c5 21. Nf4 Qd8 22. h5 g5 23. Nd5 g4 24. h6 Bh8 25. Rh1 Qh4 26. Qd2 Rxb3 27. h7+ Qxh7 28. Bg5 Rxh3+ 0-1 Andras Adorjan-Mikhail Golubev/Alushta (Ukraine) 1994 (28).

 

12... Nc5!

Attacking the e-pawn, but not to lay seige to it so much as simply to gain time for the piece redeployments that follow.

12... Ne5!? 13. f4 Ned7 14. Bf2 c5 15. Nc2 Qa5 16. Be1 Qc7 17. a4 b6 18. Qd3 Bb7 19. Rd1 Nf8 20. Bf2 Rbd8 21. Rfe1 Bc6 22. Ne3 Ne6 23. Ned5 Qb7 24. Bf1 (24. Nxf6+) 24... Nd4 25. Bxd4 cxd4 26. Nxf6+ Bxf6 27. Nd5 Bg7 28. Bg2 b5! 29. axb5 axb5 30. Rb1 Bxd5 31. exd5 bxc4 32. bxc4 Qa7 33. Kh2 Re3! 34. Rxe3 dxe3 35. Re1 Re8 36. Re2 Bd4 37. Bf3 Qa1 38. Kg2 Rb8 39. Kh2 Rb1 40. Bg2 Rd1 41. Qe4 Rd2 42. Qf3 Rc2 43. h4 Rxc4 44. h5 Kg7 45. hxg6 hxg6 46. Bf1 Rc1 47. Kg2 Qb1 48. g4 Rd1 49. g5 Bc5 50. Kg1 Qf5 51. Kh2 Rxd5 52. Rb2 Rd4 53. Kg3 d5 54. Qxe3 Re4 55. Qxc5 Rxf4 56. Rf2 Qxg5+ 57. Kh2 Rh4+ 58. Bh3 Qe5+ 59. Kg2 Qg5+ 60. Kh2 Qe5+ 61. Kg2 Qe4+ 62. Kh2 Qe6 63. Qc3+ d4 64. Qg3 Rh5 65. Rd2 Qe4 66. Rf2 d3 67. Qc7 Qd5 68. Qf4 Qd7 69. Qe3 d2 70. Rxd2 Rxh3+ 0-1 Lars Schandorff-Emanuel Berg/Helsingor DEN 2009 (70).

 

13. Qc2 Bd7

I was following the games of GM Mark Paragua, where an interesting plan for Black was demonstrated. The idea is to avoid any weakening pawn advances, to play Qc8, and to remaneuver the Knight at c5 with Ne6-d8-c6-e5. If White allows, Black can consider the classic Gallagher breaks with b5 and/ or c5, but the general idea is to avoid weakening pawn advances. Thealternative ideas are not as promising.

a) 13... Re5!? 14. b4 (14. f4 Rh5!? 15. g4 Bxg4 16. hxg4 Nxg4 17. Qe2 Qh4 18. Nf3 Qg3 19. e5 Ne6 20. Qe1 Qxe1 21. Raxe1 Nxe3 22. Rxe3 Nxf4 23. Ne4 Nxg2 24. Kxg2 Bxe5) (14. Rad1 Rh5 15. g4 Bxg4 16. hxg4 Nxg4 17. Nf3 Nxe3 18. fxe3 Bxc3 19. Qxc3 Nxe4 20. Qd4 Qe8 21. Nd2 Ng3 22. Rfe1) 14... Ncxe4 15. Bxe4 (15. Nxe4 Nxe4 16. Bxe4 Qe8 17. Bg2 Rxe3 18. fxe3 Qxe3+ 19. Kh2 Qxd4) 15... Nxe4 16. Nxe4 Qe8 17. f3 (17. Nc3 Rxe3) 17... Bxh3 (17... f5 18. Nxd6 cxd6 19. Bf4 g5!? (19... Re4 20. fxe4 Bxd4+ 21. Kh2 Bxa1 22. Rxa1 Qxe4 23. Qxe4 fxe4 24. Bxd6 Ra8 25. Re1 b5 26. Rxe4 Bf5) 20. Bxe5 (20. Bxg5 Re4!? 21. fxe4 Bxd4+ 22. Kh2 Bxa1 23. Rxa1 Qxe4 24. Qd2 Be6 25. c5 dxc5 26. bxc5 Bd5) 20... Qxe5 21. Rad1 Qxg3+ 22. Qg2 Qf4 23. Ne2) 18. Rfe1 f5 19. Qh2 fxe4 20. Qxh3 exf3 21. Bf2 Qf7 22. Rxe5 dxe5 23. Ne6

b) 13... Qe7!? 14. Rae1 (14. f3 h5 15. b4 Ne6) 14... Nfxe4 15. Nxe4 (15. Nd5) 15... Nxe4 16. Bxe4 Qxe4 17. Bd2 Qxe1 18. Rxe1 Rxe1+ 19. Bxe1 Bxd4 20. g4!

 

14. b4

a) 14. Rad1 Qc8 15. Kh2 Ne6 is the line that worried me most, based on a recent Zatonskih game. Black seems to need an improvement here.(15... Re5!? 16. g4 (16. b4!? Bxh3 17. bxc5 Rh5 18. f3 Bxg2+ 19. Kxg2 Qh3+ 20. Kf2) 16... Qe8 17. f4 Re7 18. e5 dxe5 19. Nf3 Nce4 20. Nxe4 Nxe4 21. Rxd7 Qxd7 22. Qxe4 exf4 23. Qxf4 Rbe8 24. Bc5 Re4 25. Qg3) (15... b5!? 16. b4 Ne6 17. c5 a5) 16. f4 Nxd4 17. Bxd4 Bc6 18. Rfe1 Re7 19. Nd5 Bxd5 20. cxd5 Qe8 21. Bf3 (21. e5) 21... Qd8 22. Qc3 Ne8 23. e5! Bf8 24. h4 h5 25. a4 Rc8 26. Bg2 Bg7 27. Re3 Bh6 28. Re2 Ng7 29. e6 Ne8 30. exf7+ Kxf7 31. Rxe7+ Qxe7 32. Re1 Qd8 33. Bh3 Rb8 34. Qd3 1-0 Zatonskih,A-Mueller Ludwig,K/Germany GER 2009 (34).

 

b) 14. Rfe1 Qc8 15. Kh2 Re5!? is Paragua's wild idea, which I'm not so sure about. But we did not see it tested after 16. g4?! (16. b4! Bxh3 (16... Ne6?! 17. Nf3 Rh5 18. Kg1 g5 19. g4 Rh6 20. Nxg5) 17. bxc5 Rh5 18. Rh1 dxc5 19. Nde2 Ng4+ 20. Kg1 Nxe3 21. fxe3 Qg4 22. Rf1 Bxg2 23. Kxg2 Rxh1 24. Rxh1) 16... Re8 17. f3 b5 18. cxb5 axb5 19. b4 Na6 20. Rab1 Nxb4 21. Rxb4 c5 22. Rxb5 cxd4 23. Rxb8 Qxb8 24. Bxd4 Nxg4+ 25. hxg4 Bxd4 26. Nd5 Be6 (26... Qd8!) 27. Rd1 Bxd5 28. Rxd4 Be6 0-1 Yuri Drozdovskij-Mark Paragua/Beijing CHN 2008 (39).

 

14... Ne6 15. Nb3

15. Rad1 Qc8 16. Nde2 was another Paragua game, though White might have had better.(16. Kh2! b5! (16... Nd8 17. a3 Nc6 18. f4) 17. cxb5 axb5 18. f4 c5 19. Nxe6 Bxe6 20. bxc5 b4 (20... dxc5 21. e5 Nd7 22. Ne4) 21. Na4 dxc5 22. Nxc5 Nd7 23. Rf2 Nxc5 24. Qxc5 Qxc5 25. Bxc5 Rb5 26. Bd4 Ra8 27. Bxg7 Kxg7 28. Rdd2 Rba5 29. Rd4 Rxa2 30. Rxa2 Rxa2 31. Rxb4 f5=) 16... Nd8 17. Kh2 Nc6 18. a3 Ne5 19. Nd5 Nxd5 20. cxd5 (20. exd5 c5 21. bxc5 Bf5 22. Qb3 dxc5 23. a4 b5) 20... Bb5 21. Bd4 (21. a4 Bxe2 22. Qxe2 b5) 21... c6 22. a4 Bxe2 23. Qxe2 cxd5 24. f4! Nc4 25. Bxg7 Kxg7 26. Rxd5 b5! 27. f5 (27. axb5 axb5) 27... f6 28. fxg6 hxg6 29. Qf2 Rf8 (29... Qe6!) 30. axb5 axb5 31. Ra1 Rf7 32. h4 (32. Bf1) 32... Ne5 33. Bh3?! Qc4 34. Be6 Qxe4 35. Rxe5 Qxe5 36. Re1 Qxe1 37. Qxe1 Re8 38. Qe2 Rfe7 39. Qxb5 Rxe6 40. Qd5 f5 41. h5 Re2+ 42. Kh3 Rh8 43. Qd4+ Re5 44. Qxd6 Rxh5+ 45. Kg2 Re2+ 46. Kf3 Rhh2 47. Qd4+ Kh7 48. b5 g5 49. b6 (49. Qb6 Rhg2) 49... Kg6 50. g4 fxg4+ 51. Qxg4 Rhf2+ 52. Kg3 Rg2+ 0-1 Karsten Rasmussen-Mark Paragua/Beijing CHN 2008 (52).

 

15... Qc8 16. Rad1

This is a natural square for the Rook, but the move plays directly into Black's plan to remaneuver his Knight. There seem to be two superior ways of playing the position for White, both of which troubled me:

a) 16. Kh2! Nd8 (16... h5!? 17. c5 h4) (16... c5?! 17. bxc5! Nxc5 18. Bf4!) 17. a3 (17. c5 Nc6 (17... dxc5 18. Nxc5 Bc6 19. Rad1 b6 20. Nb3 Qb7 21. f3) 18. a3 Ne5 (18... Re5) 19. Rad1 Nc4 20. Bc1 b5) 17... Nc6 18. f4 b5 19. cxb5 axb5 20. Rae1 Qa6

b) 16. f4!? Nd8 17. g4 Nc6 (17... Nxe4 18. Nxe4 f5 19. gxf5 gxf5 20. Nxd6 cxd6 21. Bd4) (17... Be6 18. c5 Nc6 19. a3 h5 20. g5 (20. f5 Bc4 21. g5 Bxf1 22. Rxf1 Nd7 23. f6 Bf8) 20... Nh7 21. Kh2) 18. a3 Be6 19. c5.

 

16... Nd8 17. Kh2

17. g4?! h5 18. f3 (18. g5 Bxh3 19. gxf6 Bxg2 20. Kxg2 Qg4+=) 18... Nc6 19. a3 (19. b5 Ne5 20. c5 hxg4 21. fxg4 axb5 22. g5 Nh5) 19... hxg4 20. hxg4 Ne5 21. c5 Be6

 

17... Nc6 18. Nd5!










a) 18. a3 a5! (18... Ne5!? 19. Bg5! b5! (19... h6 20. Bxf6 Bxf6 21. f4 Nc6 22. Nd5 Bg7 23. c5 b6 24. cxd6 cxd6 25. Ne3) (19... c5 20. Bxf6 Bxf6 21. Nd5 Bd8 22. f4 Nc6 23. bxc5 dxc5 24. Nxc5) 20. Bxf6!! Bxf6 21. Nd5 Bg7 22. cxb5 Bxb5 23. Qxc7!! Bxf1 24. Qxc8 Rbxc8 25. Bxf1 Rc2 26. Kg2 Ra2 27. Ra1 Rxa1 28. Nxa1 a5 29. Nb3 (29. Nb6 axb4) 29... axb4 30. axb4) 19. bxa5 (19. Nxa5 Nxa5 20. bxa5 Ra8) (19. b5 Ne5 20. Nxa5 Ra8) (19. Nd5 axb4 20. Bg5 Nxd5 21. cxd5 Ne5 22. f4 f6) 19... Re5 20. g4 Nxa5 21. f4 Nxc4 22. Ba7 Re8 23. e5 (23. Bxb8 Ne3) 23... Nxg4+ 24. hxg4 Ra8 25. Bd4 Bxg4

b) 18. b5 Ne5! (18... axb5 19. cxb5 Ne5 20. Bg5!?) 19. bxa6 Nxc4! 20. axb7 (20. a7 Nxe3) 20... Rxb7 21. Bd4 (21. e5 Nxe3 22. fxe3 Rxe5 23. Bxb7 Qxb7) 21... c6 22. Ne2 Be6 23. Qc3 Ne5

c) 18. c5 Nxb4 19. Qd2 Be6 (19... dxc5 20. Bxc5 Nc6 21. f4 Be6 22. Nd5=) 20. cxd6 cxd6 21. Rc1 Bxb3 22. axb3 Qe6.

 

18... b5?!

A mistake. The idea is to secure the c4 square for the Knight and to create some interesting tactical possibilities, but now Black's structure is significantly weakened. Best was:

a) 18... Nxd5! 19. cxd5 (19. exd5 Bf5 (19... Nxb4) 20. Qd2 Ne5) 19... Nxb4 20. Qd2 (20. Qb1 Ba4! (20... c5 21. a3) 21. Rc1 (21. a3 Nc6) (21. Rd2 Bc3 22. a3 Bxd2 23. Bxd2 Nc6) 21... Qd7 22. a3 Nc6! 23. dxc6? bxc6) 20... a5 (Black must give back the pawn, since 20... c5 21. Bf4! is a bust) 21. Nxa5 Na6 22. Bd4 (22. Rc1 b6 23. Nc6 Ra8=) (22. Nb3 f5 23. f3 fxe4 24. fxe4 Re5 25. Bd4 Rh5 26. Bxg7 Kxg7 27. h4 Qe8 (27... g5 28. Qd4+ Kg8 29. e5) 28. Qf4 Qe7=) 22... Bxd4 23. Qxd4 Ra8 24. Nb3 (24. Rb1 Nc5) 24... f5 25. exf5 Bxf5 and Black is in the game.

b) 18... Re5!? 19. Nxf6+! (19. Bd2 Nxd5! 20. cxd5 (20. exd5? Bxh3 21. dxc6 Rh5 22. Kg1 Bxg2 23. Kxg2 Qh3+ 24. Kf3 Rf5+ 25. Ke2 Re8+ 26. Be3 Qg2 27. Kd3 Rfe5 28. Nd4 bxc6 29. c5 a5 30. a3 axb4 31. axb4 dxc5 32. bxc5 Rd5 33. Qc4 Qe4+ 34. Kc3 Qe5) 20... Ne7 (20... Rh5 21. dxc6 Bxh3 22. Rde1 Bxg2+ 23. Kxg2 Qh3+ 24. Kf3 f5 25. Rh1 Qg4+ 26. Kg2) 21. g4 g5 22. Bc3 (22. Nd4 Ng6 23. Nf3 Bxg4 24. hxg4 Qxg4 25. Qxc7 Rbe8 26. Kg1 Nh4 27. Nxh4 gxh4 28. f3 Qg6) 22... Ng6 23. Bxe5 Bxe5+ 24. Kh1 Nf4 (24... Bxg4) 25. Rc1 Bxg4 26. hxg4 Qxg4 27. f3 Qh4+ 28. Kg1 g4 29. Rfe1 gxf3 30. Bxf3 Kh8 31. Re2 Qg3+) 19... Bxf6 20. f4 (20. b5! axb5 21. f4 Rh5 22. cxb5) 20... Rh5 21. b5 axb5 22. cxb5 Ne7 (22... Nb4 23. Qd2 Bxh3 24. Qxb4 Bg4+) (22... Bxh3 23. bxc6) 23. f5! Bxb5 (23... Nxf5 24. exf5 Bxf5 25. Rxf5!) 24. fxg6 Bxf1 25. Rxf1 Kg7 (25... Bg7 26. gxf7+ Kf8 27. Nd4) 26. gxf7.

 

19. c5

a) 19. Nxf6+! Bxf6 20. c5 (20. a3 bxc4 21. Qxc4 a5) 20... Be6 (20... Nxb4 21. Qd2 Nc6 (21... a5 22. Nxa5 Nc6 23. Nxc6 Bxc6 24. cxd6) 22. cxd6 (22. f4 Be7 23. e5) 22... Ne5 23. Na5 cxd6 (23... Bxh3 24. Bxh3 (24. f4 Ng4+ (24... Bxg2 25. Kxg2) 25. Kxh3 cxd6) 24... Nf3+ 25. Kg2 Nxd2 26. Bxc8 Nxf1 27. Kxf1 (27. d7 Nxe3+) 27... cxd6 28. Bh3 Rxe4) 24. f4 Nc4 25. Nxc4 Qxc4 26. e5 (26. Qxd6 Be6 27. f5 Rbd8 28. Qb6) 26... Be7 27. exd6 Bf6 28. Rc1 Qa4 29. Rc7) 21. cxd6 cxd6 22. Qd2 (22. Rxd6 Nxb4) 22... Ne5 (22... Rd8 23. f4) 23. Qxd6 (23. Bd4 Nc4 (23... Bc4 24. Rfe1) 24. Qc3 Bxd4 25. Nxd4 Rb7 26. f4 Rc7 27. f5 Ne5 28. Qd2 Bc4 29. Qh6 f6 30. Rf2 Nf7 31. Qe3 g5 32. Ne6 Bxe6 33. fxe6 Qxe6 34. Rdf1) 23... Nc4 24. Qc5 Nxe3 25. Qxe3 Qc3 26. Qxc3 Bxc3 27. Nc5 Bc4 28. Nxa6 Rb7 29. f4 (29. Rg1 Ra7) 29... Ra7 30. Rf3 Bg7 31. Rd6 (31. Nc5 Be2) 31... Bf8 32. Rb6 Rxe4

b) 19. cxb5 Nxd5 20. exd5 Nxb4 21. Qd2 Bxb5

c) 19. Bg5 Nxb4 20. Nxb4 bxc4 21. Bxf6 (21. Qxc4 Bb5) 21... cxb3 22. axb3 Bxf6 23. Nd5 Bd8

 

19... Nxd5 20. exd5 Bf5

20... Nxb4?! 21. Qd2 a5 (21... dxc5 22. Bxc5 a5 23. Nxa5 Na6 24. Bd4 Bxd4 25. Qxd4 Re2 26. Rd2 Rxd2 27. Qxd2 Qf8 28. Rc1 Rb6 29. Nb3 Qa3 30. Nd4 Nb4 31. Rxc7) 22. Nxa5 dxc5 (22... Na6 23. cxd6 cxd6 24. Rc1 Nc5 25. Nc6 Bxc6 26. dxc6) 23. Bxc5 Na6 24. Bd4.

 

21. Qd2 Ne5 22. Bd4! dxc5

22... Bxh3?! looks like a standard KID tactic, which often arises due to the placement of the White Queen and King and the Black Knight. However, it does not yet work because Black's Knight gets caught behind enemy lines: 23. Bxh3 Nf3+ 24. Kg2 Nxd2 25. Bxc8 Nxb3 (25... Nxf1 26. Bxa6 Re2 27. cxd6 cxd6 28. Bxg7 Kxg7 29. Kxf1 Rxa2 30. Na5 Kf6) 26. Bxg7 Rbxc8 27. cxd6 cxd6 28. Bf6 and the knight is trapped.

 

23. bxc5?










White's error is natural enough: recapturing without thinking about alternatives. He doesn't recognize that now the tactic mentioned above does work.

a) 23. Bxe5! Bxe5 24. f4! Bd6 25. bxc5 Bf8 26. Rfe1 Rxe1 27. Rxe1 is clearly to White's advantage, though Black can console himself in having the two Bishops; he has to be careful, however, not to allow his light-squared Bishop to get trapped.

b) 23. Nxc5 Bxh3! 24. Bxh3 (24. Qc3 Bxg2 25. Kxg2 a5 26. bxa5 b4 27. Qb2 Qf5) 24... Nf3+ 25. Kg2 Nxd2 26. Bxc8 Bxd4 27. Nxa6 Nxf1 28. Nxb8 Nxg3 29. Bg4 Bxf2 30. Na6 Ra8 31. Nxc7 Rxa2 32. d6 f5 33. Ra1 Rb2 34. Rb1 Rd2 35. Rd1 Rxd1 36. Bxd1 Ne4 37. d7 Bh4 38. Bb3+ Kf8 39. Ne6+ Kf7 40. Bd5.

 

23... Bxh3! 24. Bxe5

24. Bxh3 Nf3+ 25. Kg2 Nxd2 26. Bxc8 Nxb3 (26... Nxf1? 27. Bxa6) 27. Bxg7 (27. axb3 Rbxc8 28. Bxg7 Kxg7 29. Rd3 (29. d6 cxd6 30. cxd6 Rc3 31. d7 Rd8 32. Rfe1 Rc7) 29... a5) 27... Rbxc8 (27... Kxg7 28. Bd7 Re7 29. c6 Nc5 30. d6 cxd6 31. c7 Nxd7 32. cxb8=Q Nxb8 33. Rxd6) 28. axb3 (28. Bf6 Nxc5) 28... Kxg7 29. d6 cxd6 30. cxd6 Rc3.

 

24... Bxg2

24... Rxe5!? looked riskier, though it practically forces a position where Black has Rook and several pawns for two pieces: 25. Bxh3 (25. Rde1 Rh5 26. Rh1 Qf5) 25... Rh5 26. g4 Qxg4 27. Qe3 Be5+ 28. f4 Bxf4+ 29. Rxf4 Qxd1 30. Rd4 (30. Nd4 Rxd5) 30... Qf1 31. d6 cxd6 32. cxd6 Rc8 33. Rd2 Rd8 34. d7 Qf6 35. Nd4 and this should favor Black, but two pieces and a passed pawn on the 7th are scary.

 

25. Kxg2 Rxe5!

In this position, Black is simply up a pawn. He also seems to have the initiative, thanks to the Re5-h5 theme, which is common in this line and which we shall see again.

 

26. Rfe1 Rh5!










27. Rh1 Rxh1 28. Rxh1 Qd7

White has lost a tempo with his Rook, and Black has time to block the potentially dangerous White d-pawn.

 

29. Rd1

29. Re1 Rd8 30. Rd1 Re8 brings about the same position as in the game.

 

29... Re8 30. Qa5

30. d6 Bf8 31. Qd5 cxd6 32. cxd6 Rd8

 

30... Re5!

The Rook lift theme repeats itself with powerful effect. Black must sac a pawn to get active, but it appears he gets back the investment with interest.

 

31. Qxa6

31. c6 Qf5 32. Qxc7 Qe4+

 

31... Rh5










Black cannot grab the d-pawn, of course: 31... Rxd5?? 32. Qa8+

 

32. Qa8+

White has no way to avoid an attack utilizing the weakened light squares around his King. 32. f4 g5!?

32. Qc6 Qh3+ 33. Kf3 Rf5+

 

32... Bf8 33. d6 cxd6

33... Qh3+ 34. Kg1 (34. Kf3 Rf5+ 35. Ke3) 34... cxd6 35. Rxd6?! (35. cxd6 Qh2+ 36. Kf1 Qh1+ 37. Qxh1 Rxh1+ 38. Ke2 Rxd1 39. Kxd1 Bxd6) 35... Qh2+ 36. Kf1 Rf5

 

34. Rxd6?!

It is necessary to take back with the pawn, though White will end up at least a pawn down in a lost ending.

a) 34. cxd6 Qh3+ 35. Kg1 (35. Kf3 Rf5+ 36. Ke3 Re5+ 37. Kd2 Qe6 38. Kc3 Qc4+ 39. Kb2 Re2+ 40. Rd2 b4 41. Qf3 Rxd2+ 42. Nxd2 Qd4+ 43. Kc2 Bxd6) 35... Qh2+ 36. Kf1 Qh1+ 37. Qxh1 Rxh1+ 38. Ke2 Rxd1 39. Kxd1 Bxd6

b) 34. c6? Qh3+ 35. Kf3 Rf5+ 36. Ke3 Qg2

 

34... Qh3+ 35. Kg1

35. Kf3?? Qh1+ wins the Queen.

 

35... Qh2+ 36. Kf1 Rf5 37. Rd2 Qxg3 38. c6?










Afte r this, the White Queen is cut off from the defense of the King and White gets mated by force. Necessary, though lost, was

38. Qg2 Qxg2+ 39. Kxg2 Bxc5

 

38... Qh3+ 39. Ke1

39. Ke2 Qf3+ 40. Kf1 (40. Ke1 Re5+ 41. Kf1 Qh1#) 40... Rh5

 

39... Qh1+ 40. Ke2 Qf3+ 41. Kf1

41. Ke1 Re5+ 42. Kf1 Qh1#

 

41... Rh5

and mate can only be delayed but not avoided.

 

0-1

[Michael Goeller]

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Copyright © 2010 by Michael Goeller

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