Notes on the Chekhover Sicilian

By Michael Goeller

I have been playing online correspondence at Chess.com, mostly against my fellow club members, and find it is a great way to learn and explore different openings. In one of my most recent games, I tried out the Chekhover Sicilian by an unusual move order -- 1.e4 c5 2.Nc3 d6 3.d4!? cxd4 4.Qxd4 -- as I have seen Gad Guseinov play. The Chekhover has always interested me, mostly because I have seen many games over the years (especially the games of Evgeni Vasiukov) where White develops a very nice attack with very little obvious effort. There is no questions that the onus is on Black to come up with a good line of defense or counter-attack before White goes about his business.

Michael Goeller - Devin Camenares [B23]

Friendly correspondence/Chess.com (1) 2010


1. e4 c5 2. Nc3

The more common way of entering these lines is via 2. Nf3 d6 3. d4 cxd4 4. Qxd4 which is how Evgeni Vasiukov generally does it. I looked at many of his games and felt inspired by how effortlessly he seemed to get a kingside attack going, e.g.: 4... a6 (4... Nc6 5. Bb5 Qa5+ 6. Nc3 Qxb5!? is one complicated line that White gets to avoid with the 2.Nc3 move order) 5. Be3 Nc6 6. Qd2 Nf6 7. Nc3 Bg4?! (7... Ng4!?) 8. Nd4 Bd7 9. f3 e6 10. g4 h6 11. h4 b5 12. O-O-O Qc7 13. Rg1 g6 14. g5 hxg5 15. hxg5 Nh5 16. Nxc6 Bxc6 17. Kb1 Rd8 18. Qf2 Qb7 19. Bb6 Rd7 20. Bd4 Bg7 21. Rh1 Bxd4 22. Qxd4 e5 23. Qb4 Qc7 24. Bh3 Rd8 25. Bg4 Kf8 26. Ne2 a5 27. Qb3 Qb6 28. Ng3 Qc5 29. Bxh5 gxh5 30. Rxh5 Rg8 31. Nf5 d5 32. Qe3 Qxe3 33. Nxe3 d4 34. Ng4 Be8 35. Nf6 Rg6 36. c3 Ke7 37. cxd4 exd4 38. Nxe8 Rxe8 39. Rxd4 Rc8 40. Rd5 Rgc6 41. Rh1 1-0 Evgeni Vasiukov-Vladimir A Savon/Dnepropetrovsk 1980 (41).

 

2... d6 3. d4 cxd4 4. Qxd4

 










The Chekhover or Hungarian Variation, where White generally strives for speedy development and quick queenside castling, rather like Morphy's line in the Philidor with 1.e4 e5 2.Nf3 d6 3.d4 exd4 4.Qxd4.

 

4... Nc6

Attacking the Queen immediately to force White to concede the two Bishops in order to maintain his time advantage. The alternative is to prevent the Bishop pin:

4... a6 5. Bg5! This is the most aggressive post for the Bishop.(5. Be3 (a simplifying idea is 5.Nd5!? Nc6 6.Qb6!? =) 5... Nc6 6. Qb6!? (6. Qd2 Nf6 7. Nf3 transposes to Vasiukov - Savon, considered above) 6... Qxb6 (6... Qd7?? 7. Nd5) 7. Bxb6 Nf6 8. O-O-O=) 5... Nc6 6. Qd2 Nf6 (6... h6!? 7. Bh4 Nf6 (7... g5!? 8. Bg3 Bg7) 8. Bxf6 gxf6 9. f4 Bd7 10. Nf3 e6 11. Bd3 Qb6 12. O-O-O O-O-O 13. Kb1 (13. Na4!? Qc7 14. Qe3) 13... Kb8 14. f5!? (surrendering the e5 square is risky, even if White gains pressure on e6.) 14... Be7 15. Ne2 Qc5 16. Nf4 Rhg8 17. Rhf1 Ne5 18. Be2 Nxf3 19. Rxf3 Rc8 20. Rb3 Ka8 21. Bh5 Rg7 22. Bxf7 Rxf7 23. fxe6 Bxe6 24. Nxe6 Qe5 25. Qd5 Bf8 26. Rb6 Ka7 27. Rb4 Rd7 28. g3 Re8 29. Nf4 Rg7 30. a3 Ka8 31. Qb3 Ka7 32. Nd5 f5 33. exf5 Qxf5 34. Rf4 Qd7 35. Nf6 Qe6 36. Nxe8 Qxe8 37. Rdf1 1-0 Irina Vasilevich-Inna Ivakhinova/St Petersburg RUS 2009 (37)) 7. f4! (The best way to take advantage of this move order, where White is not yet committed to Nf3) 7... e6 8. Nf3 Be7 9. O-O-O O-O 10. Qe1!? Qc7 (10... h6 11. h4!?) 11. Kb1 Rd8 12. Bd3 Nb4 13. a3 Nxd3 14. Rxd3 Ne8 15. f5! Bxg5 16. Nxg5 Qe7 17. Qg3 h6 18. Nf3 exf5 19. Nd5! Qf8 20. Qh4 Be6 21. Ne7+ Kh8 22. exf5 Bd7 23. Re1 Bc6 24. Nd4 (24. g4) 24... Bd7 25. g4! Nf6 26. g5 Nh7 27. g6 (27. Rg3!) 27... Nf6 28. gxf7 Qxf7 29. Ng6+ Kg8 30. Re7 Qd5 31. Rg3 (31. Nf4! Qh1+ 32. Re1!) 31... Qh1+ 32. Ka2 Re8? 33. Rxg7+!! Kxg7 34. Ne5+ Kh7 35. Qxf6 Qd5+ 36. c4 1-0 Gadir Guseinov-Tornike Sanikidze/Baku AZE 2007 (36).

 

5. Bb5 Bd7 6. Bxc6 Bxc6










Guseinov demonstrated an excellent plan of dark-square attack vs. the alternative capture: 6... bxc6 7. Nf3 e5 8. Qd3 Nf6 9. O-O! (O-O-O is not so appropriate with the b-file open) 9... h6 10. Nd2 Qc7 11. Nc4 Rd8 12. f4 Be6 13. b3! d5 14. Nxe5 Bc5+ 15. Kh1 dxe4 16. Qg3 g5 17. Ne2 Rg8 18. Bb2 Rd2 19. f5! Bd5 20. Ng4 Nxg4 (20... Qxg3 21. Nxf6+ Ke7 22. Nxg8+) 21. Qxc7 Rxe2 22. Qc8+ Ke7 23. f6+ 1-0 Gadir Guseinov-Davit Shengelia/Baku AZE 2007 (23).

 

7. Nf3

This move tran sposes to the standard Chekhover lines. An interesting alternative that takes advantage of the 2.Nc3 move order was demonstrated by Guseinov: 7. Bg5!? Nf6 (7... h6!?) 8. O-O-O e6 9. f4 Be7 10. Nf3 h6 11. Bh4 O-O 12. Qd3 Rc8 13. Nd4 Qa5 14. f5 Rfe8 15. Rhe1 a6 16. Kb1 Bd7 17. Nb3 Qc7 18. e5 Nd5 19. Bxe7 Rxe7 20. f6 (more precise was 20. exd6! Qxd6 21. f6) 20... Ree8 21. Qg3 (21. Nxd5 exd5 22. exd6 Qxd6 23. Rxe8+ Rxe8 24. fxg7) 21... g6 22. Rd3 dxe5 23. Qh4 Kh7 24. Nd2?! ( Guseinov begins to go seriously wrong, suggesting time trouble. Very strong is 24. Rh3 h5 25. Qg5) 24... Rh8 25. Nf3? Bb5 26. Rd2 Nxc3+ 27. bxc3 Qxc3 28. Re4 Kg8 29. Qe1 Rc4 30. Re3?? Rb4+ 0-1 Guseinov,G-Antonio,V/Abu Dhabi UAE 2010 (30).

 

7... Nf6 8. Bg5 e6 9. O-O-O Be7 10. Rhe1 O-O

10... Qa5 11. Kb1 O-O 12. Qd2 (threatening Nd5) 12... Qb6 13. Nd4 Rfd8 14. f3 Rac8 15. g4 Be8 16. h4 Rc4 17. Be3 Qa6 18. g5 Nd7 19. h5! Rdc8 20. Nce2 Ne5 21. c3 R4c7 (21... R4c5) 22. Nc1 Ba4 23. Ncb3 Rd7 24. g6! hxg6 25. hxg6 Nxg6 26. Qh2 Bf6 27. Rh1 Kf8 28. Rhg1 Ke7 29. Bg5 Bxb3 30. axb3 Rc5? (30... Bxg5 31. Rxg5) 31. Bxf6+ gxf6 (31... Kxf6 32. b4!) 32. Rxg6! fxg6 33. Qh7+ Ke8 34. Qg8+ Ke7 35. Qg7+ (35. Rh1) 35... Ke8 36. Qg8+ Ke7 37. Qxe6+ Kd8 38. Qg8+ Kc7 39. Ne6+ Kb6 40. Nxc5 Kxc5 41. Qc8+ Qc6 42. Qb8 Kb6 43. Rd4 a5 44. Rd5 a4 45. c4 Qc7 46. Qa8 Qd8 47. Qxa4 Kc7 48. Ra5 Qh8 49. Ka2 Rd8 50. b4 Qh3 51. Ra7 Rb8 52. Qa5+ Kc8 53. Qd5 Qxf3 54. c5 Qf4 55. c6 Qe5 56. Qf7 1-0 Evgeni Vasiukov-Igor V Platonov/Alma-Ata (Kazakhstan) 1968 (56).

 

11. Kb1

In his Startling White Opening Repertoire, Chris Baker recommends 11. e5 but this too quickly liquidates to equality after 11... dxe5

(11... Bxf3! looks even better: 12. gxf3 (12. exf6 gxf6 13. Bh6 Bxd1 14. Rxd1 Kh8) 12... dxe5 13. Qxe5 Qb8 14. Qxb8 Rfxb8 15. Ne4 b6 16. Nxf6+ Bxf6 17. Bxf6 gxf6 18. f4 Rd8 19. f5 exf5 20. Re7 Rxd1+ 21. Kxd1 Rd8+ 22. Ke2 a5 23. c4 h5 24. Re3 Kg7 25. b3 Rd4 26. Rc3 Re4+ 27. Kf3 Re1 28. c5 bxc5 29. Rxc5 a4 30. bxa4 1/2-1/2 Brenke - Lehikoinen, ICCF 1999)

 

12. Qh4 Qc7 13. Nxe5 Rfd8 14. Ng4 Nxg4 15. Bxe7 Qf4+!? (15... Rxd1+ 16. Rxd1 Ne5 17. Bd6 Ng6 18. Qg3 Qd8 19. f3 Qh4 20. Bb8 1/2-1/2 Evgeni Vasiukov-Mikhail Tal/19 1972 (20)) 16. Kb1 Rxd1+ 17. Rxd1 Qf5 18. f3 Ne3 19. Rd2 h6 20. Qd4 Nd5 21. Nxd5 1/2-1/2 Andras Adorjan-Mikhail Tal/Sochi (Russia) 1977 (21).

 

11... h6!?

A risky move, since it creates a potential hook for White's inevitable pawn storm on the kingside. But it does encourage the White Bishop to declare its intentions and push it to a weaker square. Vasiukov has demonstrated some nice attacks against other moves:

a) 11... Qc7 12. Qd2 Rfd8 13. Nd4 Rac8 14. f3 a6 15. g4 b5 16. Nce2 Bd7 17. Ng3 g6 18. Rg1 e5 19. Ndf5 Bxf5 20. exf5 d5 21. h4 Rd6 22. Rg2 Rc6 23. Bxf6 Bxf6 24. g5 Be7 25. f6 Bd6 26. Nf1 e4 27. Ne3 exf3 28. Nxd5 Qd7 29. Ne7+ Kf8 30. Nxc8 fxg2 31. Ne7 Rb6 32. Qxg2 Qe8 33. Qg1 1-0 Evgeni Vasiukov-Walter Shawn Browne/Reykjavik 1980 (33).

 

b) 11... Qa5 12. Qd2 Qa6 13. Nd4 Rfc8 14. g4 h6 15. Bf4 b5 16. f3 Be8 17. g5 hxg5 18. Bxg5 Rc5 19. Rg1 Rac8 20. Qf4 Nh5 21. Qh4 f6 22. Bh6 Bf7 23. Bxg7 Kh7 24. e5 dxe5 25. Ne4 exd4 26. Bxf6 Bf8 27. Bxd4 Rf5 28. Ng5+ Kg6 29. Qe4 Rcc5 30. Nxe6+ Kh6 31. Be3+ 1-0 Evgeni Vasiukov-Zurab Azmaiparashvili/Dnepropetrovsk 1980 (31).

 

12. Bh4

12. Bxf6 Bxf6 13. Qe3 (13. Qxd6?! Bxc3 14. bxc3 (14. Qxd8 Raxd8 15. Rxd8 Bxe1 16. Rxf8+ Kxf8 17. Nxe1 Bxe4) 14... Qa5 15. Qb4 Qh5) 13... Qc7 14. Nd4.

 

12... Re8

Kasparov's move, but it seems too slow to me. Black has at least one strong alternative:

a) 12... d5!? 13. e5 Ne4 (13... Nd7 14. Bxe7 Qxe7 15. g4) 14. Nxe4 (14. Bxe7 Qxe7 15. Qe3=) 14... dxe4 15. Qe3 Bd5 16. Bxe7 Qxe7 17. Nd2 (17. Nd4!?) 17... Qc7 18. f4! exf3 19. gxf3 and White has chances on the g-file.

b) 12... Nxe4?! 13. Rxe4

c) 12... e5?! 13. Qd3

d) 12... Qa5! looks best: 13. Qd2 Qh5 14. h3 g5 15. Bg3 e5 16. Nh2 b5 17. f3 b4 18. Nd5 Bxd5 19. exd5 Rab8 20. Qd3 Qg6 1/2-1/2 Greet,A-Gormally,D/Swansea WLS 2006 (20).

 

13. Qd2?!

a) 13. Bg3!? was Peter Svidler's choice in the stem game, but it did not get him anywhere: 13... d5 14. e5 Ne4 15. Nxe4 dxe4 16. Qxd8 (16. Qe3!? Qa5 17. Nd2 and White can pick up the pawn at e4, though Black will have compensation, as in the game.) 16... Rexd8 17. Nd4 Be8 (17... Bd5 18. Nb5) 18. c3 Rac8 19. Kc2 b5 20. Rxe4 b4 21. Re3 a5 22. Ne2 Bc6 23. f3 Rxd1 24. Kxd1 Bc5 25. Rd3 Bb5 26. Rd2 Be3 27. Rd6 bxc3 28. Nxc3 Bf1 29. Bh4 g5 30. Be1 Bxg2 31. Ke2 Bf4 32. Bg3 Bc1 33. Na4 h5 34. Rd1 h4 35. Be1 Bf4 36. Bc3 Kg7 37. Nb6 Rh8 38. Kf2 h3 39. Bd2 Bxh2 40. Nd7 Kg6 41. Be3 g4 42. fxg4 Bc6 0-1 Svidler-Kasparov,G/Linares ESP 1999 (42).

 

b) 13. Qd3!? now looks to me like the best plan, e.g.: 13... Qa5 (13... d5! is probably Black's best try, e.g.: 14. Bxf6! (14. e5 Ne4 15. Bxe7 Qxe7 16. Qe3) 14... Bxf6 15. e5 Be7 16. Nd4 Bd7 17. f4) 14. Nd4 Rac8 15. Bxf6 Bxf6 16. f4 Red8 17. g4 b5 18. h4!? Bxd4 19. Qxd4 b4 20. Ne2 Bb5 21. g5 e5 22. Qg1!? Qb6 (22... h5 23. g6) 23. Qg4 h5 24. Qxh5 exf4 25. g6! Bxe2 26. Rxe2?! (26. gxf7+!) 26... fxg6 27. Qd5+ Kh8 28. Rg2 Qc5 29. Qf7 Qh5 30. Rdg1 Rf8 31. Qd7 Rcd8 32. Qh3 Rf6 33. Rg5 Qh7 34. Qf3 Rc8 35. h5 gxh5 36. Rxh5 Rh6 37. Rxh6 gxh6 38. Qxf4 Rg8 39. Qf6+ Rg7 40. b3 h5 41. Rg5 h4 42. Rg4 h3 43. Rh4 Qxh4 44. Qxh4+ Rh7 45. Qd8+ Kg7 46. Qc7+ Kg8 47. Qb8+ Kf7 48. Qxa7+ Kg6 49. Qg1+ Kf6 50. Qf2+ Kg6 51. Qh2 Kf7 52. Kc1 1-0 Zimina,O-Paehtz,E/Yerevan ARM 2000 (52).

 

13... Qb6?!

Black can equalize with a nice tactic, which I saw but underestimated:

a) 13... Nxe4! 14. Nxe4 (14. Rxe4 Bxh4 15. Rxh4 Bxf3) 14... Bxh4 15. Nxd6 (15. Nxh4 Qxh4 16. Nxd6 Red8 17. g3 Qxh2) 15... Bxf3! (15... Rf8?! 16. Qe3 Qe7 17. Nxh4 Qxh4 18. f4 Bxg2 19. Rg1 Bh3 20. Qe5 f6) 16. gxf3 Rf8 17. Rg1 (17. Nxb7 Qb6) 17... Qf6! (17... Bg5 18. Qb4 a5 19. Qb5 Qc7 20. Qxb7 Qc5 21. Ne4 Qe5 22. Nxg5 Rab8 23. f4 Qxf4 24. Nxe6 Qe5 25. Rxg7+ Kh8 26. Rh7+ Kxh7 27. Nxf8+ Rxf8 28. Qd5 Qxh2 29. Qf5+ Kg7 30. Qg4+ Kh7 31. f4 Qf2 32. Qf5+ Kg7 33. Qe5+ f6 34. Qh5 Rf7 35. Qg4+ Kh7 36. Rg1 1-0 Filipovic,B-Stankovic,Z/Basel SUI 2010 (36)) 18. Rg4 (18. f4 Rfd8 19. Qe3 Qe7 20. Ne4) 18... Rfd8 19. Rdg1 Bg5 20. f4 Qe7 21. fxg5 Rxd6 22. Qe2 h5 23. R4g3 g6 and Black has the more solid pawn formation for the ending. This suggests that White needs to find an improvement earlier.

 

b) 13... Qa5 is the move I was trying to discourage, but Black is probably fine after 14. Nd5 (14. g4!?) 14... Qxd2 15. Nxe7+ Rxe7 16. Nxd2 g5 17. Bg3 d5=

 

14. Nd4 Rac8

14... Nxe4 15. Rxe4 Bxe4 16. Bxe7 Rxe7 17. Nxe4 d5 (17... f5 18. Nc3) 18. Nf6+!!

 

15. f3

15. g4?! Bd7!! looks like the critical move in several lines, clearing the critical c-file: 16. g5 (16. f4? Nxe4!) 16... Ng4! 17. f4 d5! 18. h3 hxg5 19. Bxg5 Bb4 20. Ka1 e5

 

15... Red8

a) 15... d5 16. e5 Ne4 (16... Nh7 17. Bxe7 Rxe7 18. f4) 17. fxe4 Bxh4 18. Rf1 Qc7 (18... dxe4 19. Qf4) (18... Bg5 19. Qf2) (18... Bd7 19. exd5 Bg5) 19. Nf3 Be7 20. exd5 exd5 21. Qf2

b) 15... Nxe4 16. Rxe4 Bxe4 17. Bxe7 Bxc2+ 18. Nxc2 Rxe7 19. Qxd6

c) 15... Bd7! 16. Nb3 (16. Bf2 Rxc3 17. Qxc3 e5 18. Qb3 exd4) 16... Red8 (16... a5 17. e5 Nd5 18. Nxd5 exd5 19. Bxe7 Rxe7 20. Qxd5 a4 21. Nd4 Rce8 22. f4) (16... Nxe4) 17. Bf2 Qc7 18. g4 d5.

 

16. Bf2

16. g4? Nxe4

 

16... Qa6

16... Qb4 17. Nxc6 (17. Nd5 Nxd5 18. Nxc6 Qxd2 19. Nxe7+ Nxe7 20. Rxd2 b6 21. Red1 d5 22. b3 Re8 23. Kb2) 17... bxc6 18. Nd5 Nxd5 19. exd5 Qxd2 20. Rxd2 cxd5 21. Bxa7

 

17. g4!

White's attack already is looking dangerous.










17... b5?!

17... d5! is again the critical move, if only on the principle that you should always meet an attack on the flank with action in the center: 18. e5! (the only way to play for a win. Drawing by force is 18. g5!? hxg5 19. Qxg5 dxe4 (19... Nxe4 20. Qxe7 Nxf2 21. Rg1) (19... Bf8 20. Rg1 Ne8 21. e5) 20. Rg1 g6 (20... Bf8 21. Qxf6) 21. Qh6! (21. Nxc6 Rxd1+ 22. Rxd1 Qxc6 23. fxe4 (23. Bd4 Nd5 24. Qh6 Nxc3+ 25. Ka1 e5 26. Bxc3) 23... Nxe4 24. Qxe7 Nxf2) (21. Nxe6 Rxd1+ 22. Rxd1 (22. Nxd1 Bd5) 22... Qc4) 21... Bf8 (21... Ba4 22. Rxg6+ fxg6 23. Qxg6+ Kh8 24. Bh4 Bxc2+ 25. Nxc2 Rxd1+ 26. Nxd1 Rf8 27. Qh6+ Kg8 28. Qg6+ Kh8 29. Qh6+=) 22. Rxg6+ fxg6 23. Qxg6+ Bg7 24. Rg1 Ne8 25. Qxe6+ Kh8 26. Qh3+ Kg8 27. Qe6+= with a draw by perpetual check in all lines.) 18... Nd7! (18... Nh7 19. h4) 19. Qd3! (19. f4?! Nb6! 20. f5 Nc4 21. Qd3 Bd7! 22. b3 Na3+ 23. Kb2 Qa5) 19... Qxd3 (19... Qa5!? 20. f4 Bb4 (20... Nb6 21. f5 Bd7 22. fxe6 Bxe6 23. Nxe6 fxe6 24. Qg6) 21. Nb3 Qc7 22. Bh4 Re8 23. g5 h5 (23... hxg5 24. Bxg5) 24. g6) 20. cxd3! a6 (20... Bg5 21. Bg3) 21. f4 b5 22. Nce2.

 

18. h4 b4

18... d5 19. g5 b4 20. Nce2

 

19. Nce2 Bxe4?!

In retrospect, this looks like a desperate move in an increasingly bad situation. But Black gets more play than I had expected.

19... d5 must be played, though White is much better with 20. g5

 

20. fxe4 Nxe4 21. Qe3 d5 22. Bg3 Qb7

22... Bf6 23. g5! hxg5 24. hxg5 Bxg5 25. Qg1 Bh6 26. Bf4

 

23. g5! hxg5

There is no way to prevent lines from being opened on Black's king:

23... h5 24. g6!? (24. Qf3 g6 25. Rf1 Bd6 26. Bxd6 Nxd6 27. Nf4 e5 28. Nxd5 exd4 29. Nf6+) 24... Bf6 25. gxf7+

 

24. hxg5 Bxg5

24... Nxg5 25. Rh1

 

25. Qg1! a5

25... Bh6 26. Bf4 Bxf4 27. Nxf4 e5 28. Nf5 or 25... Nc3+ 26. bxc3 bxc3+ 27. Nb3 a5 28. Be5

 

26. Qh2 a4

26... Nc3+ 27. Nxc3 (27. bxc3 bxc3+ 28. Nb3 a4 29. Rh1 Kf8 (29... Bh6 30. Bf4) 30. Qh8+ Ke7 31. Qxg7) 27... bxc3 28. b3 Bh6 (28... Qb4 29. Rh1 Bh6 30. Bf4 Qa3 31. Bc1) 29. Rh1 a4 (29... Qb4 30. Bf4) 30. Bf4 axb3 31. cxb3 e5 32. Bxh6 exd4 33. Bxg7 c2+ 34. Qxc2 Rxc2 35. Bf6

 

27. Rh1 Kf8

27... Bh6 28. Bf4 Nc3+ 29. Ka1! or 27... Nc3+ 28. Nxc3

 

28. Qh8+ Ke7 29. Qxg7 Rg8

29... Nd2+ 30. Rxd2 Bxd2 31. Nf5+ or 29... Bf6 30. Bh4 Rg8 31. Bxf6+ Nxf6 32. Qh6 a3 (32... Rg6 33. Qh4)

 

30. Qe5 Qb6 31. Rh7! Bf6

31... a3 32. Nf4! Bxf4 33. Qxf4 Rcf8 34. Bh4+ Ke8 35. Rf1 or 31... Nc3+ 32. Nxc3 bxc3 33. Nf5+ Kf8 34. Rxf7+ Kxf7 35. Nd6+

 

32. Bh4 Ng5?










32... Bxh4 33. Qh5 (33. Nf4!?) 33... Ng5 (33... Rcf8 34. Qxh4+ Ke8) 34. Qxh4

 

33. Nf5+ Kd7 34. Qxf6 Qc5

34... Kc7 35. Bxg5 or 34... Nxh7 35. Qe7+ Kc6 36. Ned4+ wins the Queen.

 

35. Ned4

and here Black resigned since any attempt to recover the lost material leads to mate, e.g.

:

35... exf5

35... Nxh7 36. Qxf7+ Qe7 37. Qxe7#

 

36. Rxf7+ Nxf7 37. Qxf7+ Qe7 38. Qxe7#

1-0

[Michael Goeller]

Game in PGN

Copyright © 2011 by Michael Goeller

Bibliography

Bobby Ang, "Strictly for Amateurs" and "Chess Piece: Chekhover Variation" (Feb 11)