US Amateur Teams East 2010, Round 1

We opened the tournament ranked 12th and turned in a solid 4-0 performance.

Board 1

Steve Stoyko - Ben Katz (2130) [C00]

USATE 2010/Parsippany, NJ USA (1) 2010


1. d4 e6 2. e4 d5 3. Bd3

Stoyko has been recommending this move to me ever since we saw an SOS article on it, so I had to smile when he played it.

 

3... c5

The main idea is 3... dxe4 4. Bxe4 Nf6 5. Bf3 with surprising pressure on the long diagonal.

 

4. exd5!?

I can't find the article at the moment, but I think SOS recommends 4. c3

 

4... Qxd5 5. Nf3

5. Nc3!? Qxd4 (5... Qxg2?? 6. Be4) 6. Nf3 Qd8 7. O-O

 

5... cxd4 6. O-O Nc6 7. c3 Bd7

7... dxc3 8. Nxc3 Qd8 9. Qe2 is sort of like a Smith-Morra.

 

8. cxd4 Nf6?!

Black has to call his bluff with 8... Nxd4! 9. Nxd4 Qxd4 10. Be3!? Qxb2 11. Nd2 and it's scary, sure, but he's forced to go all in...

 

9. Nc3 Qh5 10. Nb5 Nd5 11. Be2 Qg6










12. Nc3

Simple chess, but I think Steve missed a shot: 12. Ng5! h5 (12... h6? 13. Bh5) 13. Bd3 Qf6 14. Ne4 Qd8 15. Nbd6+

 

12... Be7 13. Nxd5 exd5 14. Ne5 Nxe5 15. dxe5 O-O 16. Be3!

Obviously not 16. Qxd5?? Bc6

 

16... Bc6 17. Bd3 Qe6

17... f5 might be necessary now or later.

 

18. Bd4 f6

Otherwise Black gets rolled by f4-f5

 

19. Re1! fxe5?! 20. Rxe5 Qf7 21. Rf5 Qe6 22. Rh5 g6?










Necessary was 22... h6 23. Re5 -- now it's curtains!

 

23. Rxh7 Bf6

23... Kxh7 24. Qh5+ Kg8 25. Bxg6

 

24. Bxg6 Bxd4 25. Qxd4 Rf6 26. Bf7+

An amazing "attack out of nowhere."

 

1-0

Board 2

Elizabeth Vicary - Scott Massey [B08]

USATE 2010/Parsippany, NJ USA (1) 2010


1. e4 g6 2. d4 Bg7 3. Nf3 d6 4. Be2 Nf6 5. Nc3 c5!?

An "Enter the Dragon" line, which is omited from James Vigus's The Pirc in Black and White.

 

6. dxc5 Qa5 7. O-O Qxc5 8. Be3 Qa5

Black has to be careful: 8... Qc7? 9. e5! Ng4 (9... dxe5? 10. Nb5 Qd8 (10... Qa5 11. b4 Qd8) 11. Qxd8+ Kxd8 12. Rad1+ Bd7 13. Nxe5) 10. exd6 Qxd6 11. Qxd6 exd6 12. Nb5

 

9. Nd4

Clearing the way for action by f4, after which the position really starts to resemble the Dragon.

White could adopt a simpler plan to eliminate the dark-squared Bishop: 9. Qd2 O-O?! (9... Nc6 10. Bh6) (9... Ng4 10. Nd5 Qd8 11. Bd4) 10. Nd5! Qd8 11. Nxf6+ Bxf6 12. Bd4

 

9... Nc6 10. Nb3

Massey criticized this move, but it has been played previously by GMs and is very much in keeping with White's Classical Dragon set-up. The Knight gets off the hot d4 square, drives the Queen to a less active square, and helps prevent Na5-c4 which is Black's most annoying idea in these positions.

10. f4!? is more straight-forward. As the players discussed after, 10... Ng4? is only a ghost...(10... O-O 11. Bf3!?) ...because White has simply 11. Nxc6! though the computer finds a resource that almost makes it playable: 11... Qh5! 12. Bxg4 Bxg4 13. Qd5 Qxd5 14. Nxd5 bxc6 15. Nc7+ Kd7 16. Nxa8 Rxa8 17. c3

 

10... Qc7 11. f4

Taking away the c6 Knight's other route to c4. White can now build a bind on the position.

White might try to exploit the queen move by 11. Nd5!? Qd8 (11... Nxd5 12. exd5 Ne5 (12... Na5 13. Nxa5 Qxa5 14. Bd4) 13. Bb5+ Bd7 14. Bxd7+ Nxd7 15. Bd4 and White will eventually get pressure down the e-file which is stronger than Black's on the c-file.) 12. Nxf6+ Bxf6 13. c3.

 

11... O-O 12. Qe1

This allows Black interesting queenside counterplay. White has a number of possible plans:

a) 12. g4!? is definitely White's most aggressive idea, but Black's position seems reslilient after 12... h6 ( Fritz suggests 12... Qd7?! 13. f5 h6?! 14. h4!) 13. h4!? Nh7!

b) 12. Nd5!? goes for a safe position: 12... Nxd5 13. exd5 Na5 14. Nxa5 Qxa5 15. c3 but White does not have much pull here without eliminating the darksquared Bishop.

c) 12. Bf3! is probably best, going for a bind on d5 before taking action with g4 of Nd5. White has lots of move to improve her position, including Qe2, Rad1, Kh1 etc. while Black has few ideas that don't create weaknesses.

 

12... a5!

Black's best try, especially now that 13.a4 Nb4 comes with tempo. Not 12... Ng4? 13. Bxg4 Bxg4 14. f5 traps the Bishop.

 

13. Qf2

Perhaps 13. a3 a4 14. Nd2 keeps Black's counterplay in check.

 

13... Bg4

13... a4!? 14. Nd4 Nxd4 (14... a3!? 15. Ndb5 Qa5 16. Bb6! (16. Nxa3 Qb4) ) 15. Bxd4 a3

 

14. Bd3

14. Nd5?! Nxd5 15. exd5 Bxe2 16. Qxe2 (16. Bb6 Qc8 17. Qxe2 a4) 16... a4 17. dxc6 axb3 18. cxb7 Rxa2

 

14... Be6

The Bishop retreats to avoidgetting trapped by f5 and discourages a4 or a3 due to Bxb3.

 

15. Bb6

15. h3 a4

 

15... Qc8 16. Rad1?!

Necessary was 16. a3 Bxb3 17. cxb3 Nd7 18. Be3 Nc5 and things are still unclear and White does have the two Bishops after Bc2 or even the interesting Bc4 inviting Black to give up the other bishop to win a pawn.

 

16... a4! 17. Nd4?










17. Nc1 a3

 

17... Ng4! 18. Qg3

18. Nxc6 Qxc6! 19. Nd5 Nxf2 20. Nxe7+ Kh8 21. Nxc6 Nxd1

 

18... Bxd4+

Even better is 18... Nxd4! 19. f5 Nxf5 20. exf5 gxf5

 

19. Bxd4 Nxd4 20. f5 Ne5 21. fxe6 fxe6 22. Rxf8+ Qxf8

Black has a solid extra pawn and went on to win.

 

0-1

[Michael Goeller]


Board 4

J. Moore - Michael Goeller [C44]

USATE 2010/Parsippany, NJ USA (1) 2010


1. c4 e5 2. e4?! Nc6 3. Nf3 Bc5 4. g3?










4... Nf6!

Black is already winning a pawn by force.

 

5. d3 Ng4 6. Be3 Nxe3!?

I opted for the monster Bishop rather than the monster Knight. Of course, 6... Bxe3 7. fxe3 Nxe3 8. Qe2 Nd4 9. Nxd4 exd4 is also strong.

 

7. fxe3 Bxe3 8. Nbd2 d6 9. Qe2 Nd4! 10. Nxd4 Bxd4!?

10... exd4 11. O-O-O Qg5 12. Bg2 Qa5 is probably stronger, as Scott Massey pointed out after.

 

11. Nb3 Bb6 12. O-O-O?










12... Qg5+ 13. Kb1

Not 13. Qd2?? Be3

 

13... Bg4 14. Qe1 Bxd1 15. Qxd1 O-O 16. a3 f5 17. Bg2 c6 18. d4?! fxe4 19. Bxe4 exd4 20. Nxd4? Qe5 21. Re1 Qxd4 22. Qc2

22. Qh5 g6! 23. Bxg6 hxg6 24. Qxg6+ Qg7 25. Qe6+ Qf7 26. Qg4+ Kh8 27. Re6 Qf5+

 

22... Rf2 23. Bxh7+ Kh8 24. Qg6? Qxb2#

0-1

[Michael Goeller]

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Game in PGN

Copyright 2010 by Michael Goeller