Addled Adelaide Counter Gambit

When you play sharp openings like the Adelaide Counter Gambit versus the King's Gambit, it pays to do your homework. The following game was an interesting mess as both players stumbled into a crazy line unprepared.

Donald Carrelli - Michael Goeller [C30]

KCC Summer Tourney/Kenilworth, NJ USA (8) 2011


1. e4 e5 2. f4 Nc6 3. Nf3 f5 4. d4?!

 

 

Not the best move for White and therefore not one I have analyzed before, though I have seen it in blitz. White has several alternatives:

a) 4. Nxe5? Nxe5 5. fxe5 Qh4+ 6. g3 (6. Ke2 Qxe4+ 7. Kf2 Bc5+) 6... Qxe4+ happens with surprising frequency in blitz games.

 

b) 4. exf5 e4 5. Ne5 Nf6 is the main line, which has proven playable for Black: 6. d3 (6. Be2 Bc5 7. Bh5+ Kf8 8. Nf7? Qe8) 6... Qe7! 7. d4 (7. Nxc6 dxc6) 7... d6 8. Nxc6 bxc6 9. c4 Bxf5 10. Nc3 g6 11. Be2 Bg7 12. Be3 h5!? (12... Ng4! 13. Bxg4 Qh4+ 14. g3 Qxg4) 13. h3 h4 0-1 Ferkingstad,S (2228)-Hammer,J (2287)/Oslo NOR 2006 (27).

 

c) 4. d3 is boring but also White's safest course, as in a recent GM encounter: 4... d6 5. Nc3 Nf6 6. g3 g6 7. Bg2 Bg7 8. fxe5 dxe5 9. Bg5 h6 10. Be3 O-O= 11. O-O fxe4 12. dxe4 Be6 13. a3 Kh7 14. Kh1 a6 15. Bg1 Rf7 16. Qe2 Nd4 17. Qd3 Nxf3 18. Qxf3 Rd7 19. Rad1 Bg4 20. Rxd7 Bxf3?! (20... Qxd7 21. Qe3 Be6=) 21. Rxd8 Bxg2+ 22. Kxg2 Rxd8 23. Be3 g5 24. h3 Kg6 25. g4 c6 26. Rf2 b5 27. Rd2 Rxd2+ 28. Bxd2 Bf8 29. Kf3 h5?! (29... Nd7=) 30. Ne2 hxg4+ 31. hxg4 Nd7 32. Nc1 c5 33. Na2 Nb8? (33... c4!=) 34. c4! bxc4 35. Nc3 Nc6 36. Nd5 Nd4+ 37. Ke3 Kf7 38. Nb6 Ke6 39. Nxc4 Be7 40. Ba5 Nb5 41. Kd3 Nd6? 42. Nxd6! 1-0 Vassily Ivanchuk (2754)-Hikaru Nakamura (2733)/Cap d'Agde FRA.

 

4... fxe4

Wahl's remedy was: 4... exd4 5. Nxd4 (5. e5!?) 5... fxe4 6. Nxc6 bxc6 and now Black would have the advantage due to his powerful center majority, so White should force a draw: 7. Qh5+ Ke7 8. Qc5+ Ke8 (8... Kf7 9. Bc4+ d5 10. Qxc6) 9. Qh5+=

 

5. Nxe5 Nf6!?

I have played this move with success in blitz games, but no one has challenged me with White's next move before. Much easier for Black is

5... d6! 6. Nxc6 (6. Qh5+?! g6 7. Nxg6 Nf6 8. Qh4 Nxd4! 9. Nxh8 Nxc2+ 10. Kd1 Nxa1 11. Be2 Bg7 12. Bh5+ Kf8 13. f5 Bxh8 14. Bh6+ Bg7 15. Bxg7+ Kxg7 16. Qg5+ Kh8 17. Nc3 Qf8 18. Rf1 Qg7 19. Qxg7+ Kxg7 20. Be2 d5 21. Nb5 c6 22. Nc7 Rb8 23. g4 h6 24. h4 Bd7 25. Kd2 d4 26. Rxa1 Rc8 27. g5 Rxc7 28. gxf6+ Kxf6 29. Bg4 Rc8 30. Bh5 Rg8 31. Bg6 Bxf5 32. Bxf5 Rg2+ 0-1 Berntsen,S (2192) -Schneider,I (2368)/Feugen AUT) 6... bxc6 7. Nc3 Nf6= when Black essentially has a reversed Vienna Gambit position where White's extra tempo has been spent on the bad move f4, which blocks his dark-square bishop and makes it impossible to challenge Black's pawn at e4 with the standard f3. For example: 8. d5! cxd5 (8... Bd7!?) 9. Nxd5 (9. Bb5+!) 9... c6 10. Nxf6+ Qxf6 11. c4 d5!? 12. cxd5 Bb4+ 13. Bd2 (13. Kf2 Qd6) 13... Qxb2 14. Bxb4 Qxb4+ 15. Qd2 Qxd2+ 16. Kxd2 cxd5 0-1 Schaack,H-Klein/Germany 1993 (34).

 

6. d5!










6... Ne7?!

It turns out that this may be practically losing if White follows up correctly. Black must play 6... Nb4! 7. Nc3 (7. c4 Na6! and Black has good play due to the threat of d6, potentially trapping White's Knight) 7... c6! but I would have had to correctly evaluate several tactically complicated possibilities, including: 8. Nxe4!? (or 8. dxc6 dxc6! 9. Qe2 Qa5! 10. Nc4 Qh5 or 8. d6!? Bxd6! 9. Qxd6 Nxc2+ 10. Kd1 Nxa1) 8... d6! (8... Nxe4!? 9. Qh5+ g6 10. Nxg6 hxg6 11. Qxg6+ Ke7 12. Qxe4+ Kf7 13. Bc4) 9. Nxf6+ Qxf6 10. Nc4 Nxd5=.

 

7. d6?!

a) 7. Bc4 b5! 8. Bxb5 (8. Bb3 d6 9. Nc6 Nxc6 10. dxc6 d5) 8... Nexd5=

b) 7. c4?! d6! 8. Nc3 (8. Qa4+ c6 9. dxc6 bxc6 10. Nxc6 Qd7) 8... c6!

c) 7. Nc3! c6? was my plan (also bad is 7... d6? 8. Bb5+ Nd7 9. Nxd7 Bxd7 10. Bxd7+ Qxd7 11. Nxe4 but 7... a6! 8. Ng4! Neg8! may actually still hold, though it would be unlikely I'd find this over the board) but now White can unleash a winning attack by 8. d6! Ned5 (8... Nf5 9. g4! Nxd6 10. g5 Nd5 11. Nxd5 cxd5 12. Qh5+) 9. Nxd5 cxd5 10. g4! g5!? (10... Bxd6 11. g5 Bxe5 12. fxe5 Ng8 13. Qxd5) 11. h4!! gxf4 12. Bxf4 Bxd6 13. g5

 

7... cxd6 8. Nc4 Ned5 9. g4

I most worried about 9. a4!? when perhaps 9... Nb4!? (I was planning 9... h5!?) 10. c3 d5! 11. Ne3 d4 12. cxd4 d5

 

9... b5!










10. Nxd6+?

Unnecessary desperation.

a) 10. Nca3! and we still have a crazy position with lots of possibilities for both sides.

b) 10. g5? bxc4 11. gxf6 Nxf6 12. Bxc4 Qb6

 

10... Bxd6 11. g5 Bb7 12. gxf6 Qxf6

Black's huge development advantage is more decisive than the material.

 

13. Qh5+ g6 14. Qg5 Qxg5!?

14... Qd4 15. c3 Qb6

 

15. fxg5 Rc8! 16. c4? bxc4 17. Bd2? e3

once the Bishop moves, Nb4 will pick up a Rook. A wild game, and a good lesson to study this sharp opening more carefully before playing it again!

 

0-1

[Michael Goeller]

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Game in PGN

Copyright © 2011 by Michael Goeller

See also: Adelaide Counter Gambit Bibliography