Winning with a Forced Draw in the Petroff

I stopped by the club on Thursday night and was able to pick up the scoresheet from one of the more exciting games played in the Kenilworth Chess Club Quads.

Ian Mangion (1971) - Mark Kernighan (2234) [C43]

Kenilworth CC Quads/Kenilworth, NJ USA (2) 2011


1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 Nf6 3. d4 Nxe4

As I discussed in "Anti-Petroff Repertoire with d4," White can meet 3... exd4 with 4. e5 (4. Bc4!? transposes to the Urusov Gambit) 4... Ne4 when White has various choices, including the standard 5.Qxd4 and the interesting 5.Qe2!? (which I discuss in my article). Recently, someone posted a note on my blog mentioning the intriguing 5. Bb5!? trying to transpose to the Ruy Lopez, but this seems rather messy: 5... c6! (5... Nc6 6. O-O leads to well-known lines of the Ruy Lopez, Belin Defense, which presumably would not be well known to a Petroff player; 5... Bb4+!? 6. c3 dxc3 7. O-O gives White compensation, though I'd prefer to have the Bishop at c4 here; definitely worse is 5... a6?! 6. Qxd4 Nxf2!? 7. Qxf2! axb5 8. O-O Forintos and Haag) 6. Qxd4 Qa5+! (Critical. White has a slight edge after 6... Nc5 7. Bc4 b5 8. Bb3) 7. c3 Nxf2 (7... Qxb5 8. Qxe4 Na6 9. c4) 8. Qxf2 (8. O-O!? Nh3+ 9. gxh3 Euwe) 8... Qxb5 9. a4 Kosten - Miralles, Lyon 1988.

 

4. Bd3 d5

4... Nc6!? is Murey's surprising idea, when Black can regain the piece after 5.Bxe4 d5 with 6...e4 to follow. White has a wide range of choices, and in my article I analyzed 5. dxe5; 5.Bxe4 d5 6. Bg5!; 5.Nxe5; and 5.d5!?

 

5. Nxe5

5. dxe5 was the focus of my "Anti-Petroff Repertoire with d4."

 

5... Nd7

In "Plugging Away at the Petroff" (Chess Life, March 2011), Andy Soltis discusses the origins of this move, which was initially rejected by theory but later analyzed by Ken Rogoff, who demonstrated its value in several games.

 

6. Nxf7!?










6. Qe2 Nxe5! Rogoff's move according to Soltis

Less good is 6... Qe7?! which practically loses a tempo on the line discussed in the main game: 7. Nxf7! Kxf7 (7... Qxf7 8. f3 Ndf6 9. Nd2) 8. Qh5+ Kf6?! (8... Ke6 9. Bxe4 Nf6 (9... dxe4 10. d5+ Kd6 11. Bf4+ Ne5 12. Na3) 10. Qe5+ Kf7 11. Bd3) 9. O-O Qf7 10. Qh4+ g5 11. Bxg5+! Nxg5? (11... Kg7! 12. f3 Nd6 13. Bh6+ Kg8 14. Qg5+ Bg7 15. Bxg7 Qxg7 16. Qxd5+ Qf7 17. Qg5+) 12. f4 Ke6 13. fxg5 Qg7 14. Nc3 Nb6 15. Rf6+ Kd7 16. Raf1 Ke8 17. Rf7 Qxf7 18. Rxf7 Kxf7 19. g6+! Ke6 20. Qe1+ 1-0 Bukhuti Gurgenidze-Robert Bellin/Tbilisi-Sukhumi 1977.

 

7. Bxe4 dxe4 8. Qxe4 Be6 9. Qxe5

Or 9. dxe5 Bd5 10. Qg4 h5 11. Qh3 Qe7 12. f4 Qe6 13. Qxe6+ fxe6 14. O-O Bc5+ 15. Kh1 O-O-O 16. Nc3 Bc6 17. f5 Rd4 18. h3? Rg4! 0-1 Kane-Rogoff/USA 1973.

 

9... Qd7 10. Nc3 O-O-O 11. Be3 Bb4 12. O-O f6 13. Qg3

No better is 13. Qf4 Bd6 14. Qf3 Bg4 15. Qd5 Bxh2+ 16. Kxh2 Qxd5 17. Nxd5 Rxd5 1/2-1/2 Wolfgang Unzicker (2510)-Kenneth Rogoff (2520)/Amsterdam 1980.

 

13... Bxc3!? (13... h5 is also good) 14. bxc3 h5 15. h4 g5! (Black's attack is greatly enhanced by the Bishops of opposite color) 16. f3 Rdg8 17. Rf2 Qc6 18. Bd2 g4! 19. f4 Bc4 20. d5 Bxd5 21. f5 Re8 22. a3 Re4 23. Re1 Rhe8 24. Rxe4 Rxe4 25. Kh2 Qc5 26. Bf4 Re1 27. Bd2 Ra1 28. Qe3 Qd6+ 29. Rf4 b6 30. c4 Bxc4 31. Qd4 Qxd4 32. Rxd4 Bb5 0-1 Anatoli Karpov-Bent Larsen/Tilburg 30/236 1980 (66).

 

6... Kxf7

6... Qe7! looks like a better try, but only if Black does some deep homework: 7. Nxh8 Nc3+ 8. Kd2 Nxd1 9. Re1 Nxf2 10. Bxh7 Ne5!

This seems the best try at retaining winning chances for Black. The first game to test this line instead ended in a draw after 10... Ne4+ 11. Rxe4 dxe4 12. Bg6+ Kd8 13. Nf7+ Ke8 14. Nd6+ 1/2-1/2 Igor Arkadievich Zaitsev-Anatoli Karpov/Russia, Leningrad 1966.

 

11. Rxe5 Be6 12. Bg6+

No better is 12. Bg8 Qh4! 13. Bf7+ Kd8 14. Rxe6 Qg5+ 15. Ke2 Qxg2 16. Re8+? Kd7 17. Rxa8 Ne4+ and Black forces mate.

 

12... Kd7 13. Bf7 Ne4+ 14. Ke1 Qh4+ 15. g3










15... Bb4+?!

Computer analysis suggests that Black may retain winning chances by 15... Qxh8! -- for example: 16. Bxe6+ Kd6 17. Bxd5 Qxh2 18. Bxe4 Qg1+ 19. Ke2 Qxc1 20. Rd5+ Ke6 21. Re5+ Kd7 22. Bf5+ Kd8. Perhaps someone has analyzed this line and wants to share.

 

16. c3 Qxh2

Still the right move is 16... Qxh8! 17. Bxe6+ Kd6 18. Bxd5 Qxh2 19. Bf4 Qxb2.

 

17. Bxe6+ Kc6 18. Bxd5+ Kb6 19. Bxe4 Bd6 20. Ng6 Qxg3+ 21. Ke2 Bxe5 22. Nxe5 Rh8 23. Be3!? Rh2+ 24. Kd3 Qe1 25. d5+ Ka6 26. Kd4 Rxb2 27. Bd3+ (27. Nd3! Qd1 28. Nd2) 27... b5 28. a4! Qh4+ 29. Be4 b4 30. Nd3 Qf6+ 31. Kc4 Rxb1 32. Nc5+! Ka5 33. Bd4 Qf1+ 34. Bd3 Rxa1 35. cxb4+ Kb6 36. a5+ Rxa5 37. bxa5+ Kxa5 38. Bxf1 1-0 David Smerdon-Stephen John Solomon/Gold Coast, Australia 1999.

 

7. Qh5+ Ke6 8. Qe2

 










8... Kd6?

Black can still take a draw, but it appears there was nothing more:

a) 8... Bd6!? is one way to keep playing, but White gains the edge after 9. f3 Qh4+ 10. Kd1 Ndf6 11. fxe4 Kf7 12. Nd2 dxe4 13. Nxe4! Bg4 14. Ng5+ Kf8 15. Nf3 Bxf3 1/2-1/2 William J Aramil-Victor Mikhalevski/Los Angeles 2003(15... Qh5 16. c3) 16. Qxf3 Qxd4 17. Qxb7.

 

b) 8... Kf7 9. Qh5+ would produce a speedy draw by perpetual check, as has happened in several games.

 

9. Bf4+ Kc6?! 10. Bxe4 dxe4 11. Nc3!

11. Qc4+ Kb6 12. Nc3 simply transposes moves.

 

11... a6 12. Qc4+ Bc5

Black has nothing better:

a) 12... Kb6? 13. Bxc7+! Qxc7 14. Nd5+

 

b) 12... Nc5 13. dxc5 Bxc5 14. Rd1 Qf8 15. b4 b5 16. Qd5+

 

13. Qd5+?!

13. dxc5! Nxc5 (13... Nf6 14. Rd1 Qg8 15. Qa4+ b5 16. cxb6+ Kb7 17. bxc7) 14. b4 b5 15. Qxc5+ Kb7 16. Nxb5!

 

13... Kb6 14. dxc5+ Ka7?!

A better try is 14... Nxc5! 15. O-O-O Qxd5 16. Nxd5+ Kc6 17. Nxc7 and though White still has a winning edge, he will have to prove his technique against a master.

 

15. O-O-O! Rf8 16. Be3

16. c6! bxc6 (16... Rxf4 17. cxd7) 17. Be3+ Kb8 18. Qb3+ Bb7 19. Nxe4

 

16... c6 17. Qxe4 g6 18. Rd2 Qe8 19. Qb4 b5?!

19... Qe5 20. Rhd1 Qc7 21. Ne4

 

20. cxb6+ Kb7 21. Qd6 Nxb6 22. Bxb6 Kxb6 23. Nd5+ Ka5?

Black can still pose some problems with 23... Ka7 24. Qc7+ Bb7 25. Qb6+ Kb8 but White wins with 26. Nf6! and threats of Nd7+, Rhd1 with Rd8+, and Rd7 are unstoppable. Of course, 26. Nc7 picking up the exchange wins too. Now White just needs to find mate in one!

 

24. Qb4#










A very nice game from Dr. Mangion, who clearly is on his way to a well-deserved Expert rating.

 

1-0

[Michael Goeller]

download PGN

Game in PGN

Bibliography

Michael Goeller, Anti-Petroff Repertoire with d4

Andy Soltis, "Plugging Away at the Petroff" (Chess Life, March 2011)