The Anti-Modern 5...Ng4

By Michael Goeller

Probably the most annoying line for White to face against the Two Knights Modern Attack (1.e4 e5 2.Nf3 Nc6 3.Bc4 Nf6 4.d4 exd4 5.e5) is the counter-attacking 5...Ng4, which immediately puts pressure on White's advanced pawn on e5 and makes it difficult for him to both defend that pawn and try to regain his lost pawn at d4. In this way, it is the perfect "dark square" system against the Modern and really ought to be called "The Anti-Modern." Inspired by James Schuyler's discussion of this line in his excellent book The Dark Knight System (where he reaches this line via the move order 1.e4 Nc6 2.d4 e5 3.Nf3 etc.), I thought I would present a repertoire for Black that builds on Schuyler's suggestions. Though I have mainly played these positions from the White side, I must say that I am more likely to play them from the Black side in the future!

Game One

6.Bxf7+ Kxf7 7.Ng5+ Kg8 8.Qf3!?

Yolanda Penas Hernandez (1945) - Alejandro Dominguez Ramos (2025) [C55]

Ideal Clave op/Barcelona (4) 1997


1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. Bc4 Nf6 4. d4 exd4 5. e5 Ng4 6. Bxf7+!?

Until the 20th Century, this move was thought to refute 5...Ng4, but analysis of Prik (1912) helped to change that assessment. It has taken a long time for the reassessment of that move to gain acceptance. In my view, however, 5....Ng4 is definitely Black's most dangerous move and the best with which to play for a win.

 

6... Kxf7 7. Ng5+ Kg8!

This is generally the correct retreat in such positions unless the White Queen can immediately get to the a2-g8 diagonal.

 

Not as strong here is 7... Ke8!? because the King will be stuck in the center for a while, but Black should still be better after 8. Qxg4 d6 9. Qe4 (perhaps 9. Qg3!? h6 10. Nf3 dxe5 11. O-O, but not 9. e6 Qf6 10. O-O [10. Na3 a6] 10... h6 11. Ne4 Qxe6 12. Qh5+ Qf7 [12... g6] 13. Qe2 Be6 14. f4 Kd7 15. b3 Re8 0-1 Maszota,N-Chmielinska,A/Rowy 1998 (31)) 9... dxe5 10. Nxh7!? ( re-establishing material equality, but White does not do much better with 10. O-O  Be7! 11. Nxh7 Be6 12. Ng5 Bxg5 13. Qg6+ Bf7 14. Qxg5 Qxg5 15. Bxg5 Kd7) 10... Be6 11. Ng5 Qd5 12. Nd2 (12. Qg6+ Kd7) 12... Qxe4+ 13. Ndxe4 Bd5 and Black's two bishops and central pawn majority gave him a clear advantage in Hector,J (2500)-Arbakov,V (2460)/ Berlin 1993, 0-1 (79).

 

8. Qf3!?

 










This temporary piece sacrifice must be studied closely to avoid getting "miniatured." There is only one defense to this move, and if Black does not know it he loses quickly due to the twin threats of Qf7# and Qb3+ or Qd5+.

 

8... Bb4+

The only move, but sufficient to give Black a winning advantage.

a) 8... Qe7?? 9. Qd5+ Qe6 10. Nxe6 dxe6 11. Qe4 Ngxe5 12. c3!

b) 8... Nf6?? 9. Qb3+! d5 10. exd6+ Nd5 11. Qxd5+ Be6 12. Qxe6#

 

9. c3 Qe7!?

This is James Schuyler's recommendation in The Dark Knight System. Schuyler's analysis of the 5...Ng4 line in that book inspired me to put together this analysis. This move is practically interchangeable with the "book" move, 9... Ngxe5, and probably simplifies things considerably.

a) 9... Ncxe5?? 10. Qd5+ Kf8 11. Ne6+! 1-0 Muratov,J-Baranov, B/Correspondence.

b) 9... Ngxe5 (the book move) 10. Qd5+ Kf8 11. O-O (if 11. cxb4 Nxb4! [or 11... Nd3+ 12. Kd2 Qf6] 12. Ne6+ Kg8 13. Qxe5 dxe6; and if 11. f4 Nd3+ 12. Kd2 Qf6 13. Kxd3 d6 14. cxd4 [14. Re1 Bc5] 14... Bf5+ 15. Kc4 h6 16. Ne4 Qg6) 11... Qe7 (11... Qf6 12. cxb4 d6 0-1 Ketzetzis,G (2045)-Miturova,M (1879)/Pardubice 2007 (28) but even better 12... h6!) ) 12. f4 (12. cxb4 Nxb4 13. Qb3 h6) 12... Ng4 13. cxb4 h6 14. Nf3 Nf6 (14... Nxb4!?)

 

10. O-O

10. Qd5+ Kf8 11. O-O Ngxe5 12. cxb4 Nxb4 13. Qb3 h6 Schuyler.

 

10... h6?!

The superior 10... Ngxe5! 11. Qd5+ Kf8 12. cxb4 Nxb4 13. Qb3 h6 transposes to Schuyler's main line.

 

11. cxb4?

11. Qd5+! Kf8 12. Qf3+ Ke8 13. Qxg4 hxg5 14. cxb4 d6 15. exd6 (15. Qg3?! Qxe5 16. f4 Qd5) 15... Bxg4 16. dxe7 Nxb4 17. Na3 Kxe7 18. Bxg5+ Kd7

 

11... Nxh2! 12. Kxh2?

12. Qb3+ Kf8 13. Qh3 Kg8 (13... Nxf1! 14. Qf3+ Ke8 15. Qh5+ g6 16. Qxg6+ Kf8) 14. Qb3+ Kf8 15. Qh3 Ng4!? (15... Nxf1!) 16. Qf3+ Kg8 17. Qb3+ Kf8 18. Qf3+ Ke8 19. Qxg4 hxg5 20. Bxg5 Qxe5 21. Bf4 Qh5 22. Re1+ Kf7 23. Qxh5+ Rxh5 24. Bxc7 Nxb4 25. Na3 1/2-1/2 Hector, J (2515) -Lejlic,S (2420)/Limhamn op (43).

 

12... Qxe5+ 13. Kg1 hxg5 14. Qb3+ d5 15. f4 Qd6 16. Na3 a6 17. Bd2 g4 18. b5 Ne7 19. Bb4 Qf6 20. Bxe7 Qxe7 21. Qxd5+ Be6 22. Qxb7 Re8 23. bxa6? g3!

and White cannot avoid mate by Qh4 or Rh1+ followed by Qh4+.

0-1

[Michael Goeller]


Game Two

6.Bxf7+ Kxf7 7.Ng5+ Kg8 8.Qxg4 h6!

Roeland Verstraeten - Cornelius Van Wieringen [C55]

Corr. ch-Netherlands/Correspondence 1990


1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. Bc4 Nf6 4. d4 exd4 5. e5 Ng4 6. Bxf7+ Kxf7 7. Ng5+ Kg8 8. Qxg4 h6

Move order is critical; not 8... d6?? 9. Qf3 and Black must lose at least a piece after 9...Qe7 10.Qb3+ Be6 etc. 1-0 Rosenblatt, E-Wolferink,F/Dieren 1980/[Goeller, Michael]

 

9. Nf3

a) 9. Qf3 hxg5! 10. Qd5+ Kh7 11. h4 g4 (11... gxh4 12. Qe4+ g6 13. Rxh4+ Kg7 14. Rxh8 Kxh8 15. Qxg6 Qe7) 12. Qe4+ g6 13. h5 Qe8 14. Qxg4 (14. hxg6+ Kg7 15. Rxh8 Kxh8 16. Qxg4 Kg7) 14... Kg8 (14... Nxe5 15. Qe2 d3 16. cxd3 Nxd3+ 17. Kf1 Qxe2+ 18. Kxe2 Nxc1+ 19. Rxc1 Bg7) 15. Kd1 d6 16. Qg3 dxe5 (16... Nxe5) 17. Nd2 Bg7 18. h6 Rxh6 19. Rxh6 Bxh6 20. Ne4 Bg7 21. Bg5 Bf5 22. Nf6+ Bxf6 23. Bxf6 Qf7 0-1 Vasiliev,A-Selivanovsky,S/ Moscow 1962/[Goeller,Michael]

 

b) 9. Nh3!? d6 10. e6 Qf6 11. Nf4 Bxe6! 12. Nxe6 (12. Qxe6+ Qxe6+ 13. Nxe6 Re8) 12... Re8 13. O-O Qxe6 0-1 Shadrina,T (2373)-Pogonina,N (2442)/Moscow ch-RUS women 2011 (53).

 

9... d6 10. Qe4

10. e6?! Qf6 11. O-O Bxe6 12. Qh5 Qf5 13. Qxf5 Bxf5 14. Na3 a6 15. b3 g5 16. Bb2 Bg7 17. h3 d3 18. Bxg7 Kxg7 19. c3 b5 20. Nd4 Nxd4 21. cxd4 c5 22. Rac1 Rac8 23. g4 Bg6 24. f4 gxf4 25. Rxf4 c4 26. bxc4 bxc4 27. Rxc4 d2 0-1 Weeramantry,S-Polovodin,I/ Philadelphia 1991.

 

10... dxe5 11. Nxe5

11. O-O Qf6 12. c3 Bf5 13. Qd5+ Kh7 14. Qb5 d3 15. Re1 a6 16. Qb3 (16. Qxb7 Bc5 17. Qb3 e4) 16... e4 17. Nd4 Nxd4 18. cxd4 Qxd4 19. Qxb7 Qb4 (19... Bb4) 20. Qxb4 Bxb4 21. Bd2 Bc5 22. Be3 Bxe3 23. Rxe3 Rhb8 24. b3 Rb4 25. Nd2 a5 26. a3 Rb5 27. Rc1 Rab8 28. Ree1 Rxb3 29. Nxb3 Rxb3 30. Red1 Rxa3 31. h3 Ra2 32. Rxc7 Be6 33. Rb7 a4 34. Rbb1 Bb3 35. Ra1 Rxa1 36. Rxa1 0-1 Pyda,Z (2180)-Panczyk,K (2415)/ Goldap ch-POL sf 1988/[Goeller, Michael]

 

11... Qe8!

 










This move is strongest, but Black can get the advantage in a number of ways:

a) 11... Qf6 12. Nxc6 bxc6 13. c3 Bf5 14. Qxd4 Qg6 15. O-O (15. Nd2 Re8+ 16. Kf1 Bd3+) 15... Bxb1 16. Bf4 Be4 17. f3 Bd5 18. c4 Bf7 0-1 Lichman,P (2375)-Krejci,J (2305)/Herceg Novi ch-EUR U18 2008/[Goeller,Michael] (46)

b) 11... Nxe5 12. Qxe5 Qe7 13. Bf4 Bf5 14. O-O  Qxe5 15. Bxe5 c5 0-1 Mallaghan,D-Sisatto,O (2283)/ Kallithea ECC 2008/ [Goeller,Michael] (32).

 

12. f4

12. Bf4? Bd6 13. O-O Nxe5 14. Re1 (14. Nd2 Bd7 15. Rfe1 Bc6 16. Qf5 Qg6 0-1 Caffaratti,P-Roldan,A/IECG Email (26) ) 14... Bf5 15. Qxf5 Nf3+! 0-1 David,I-Drygalski,W/corr ICCF

 

12... Bd6 13. O-O Nxe5 14. Re1

a) 14. Nd2 Bd7 15. fxe5 Qxe5 16. Qxe5 Bxe5 17. Nf3 Bf6

b) 14. fxe5 Qxe5 15. Qxe5 Bxe5 16. Bf4 Bxf4 17. Rxf4 c5 0-1 Gorus,W (800)-Paris,P (800)/IECG Email (39).

 

14... Bf5! 15. Qd5+ Be6

15... Qf7! 16. Qxb7 (16. Qxf7+ Nxf7) 16... Rf8 17. fxe5 Be4

 

16. Qxb7?

16. Qe4 Ng4 17. Qxe6+ Qxe6 18. Rxe6 Kf7

 

16... Rb8 17. Qe4 Bf5! 18. Qe2

18. Qd5+ Qf7

 

18... d3 19. Qd2

19. cxd3 Bxd3 20. Qd1 Nf3+ 21. gxf3 Qg6+ 22. Kh1 Bxb1

 

19... dxc2 20. Nc3 Rd8 21. Qe2

21. Qd5+ Be6 22. Qe4 Ng4 23. Qxe6+ Qxe6 24. Rxe6 Kf7 25. f5 Bxh2+ 26. Kf1 Rd1+ 27. Ke2 Rhd8

 

21... Bd3 22. Qd2 Bc5+ 0-1

[Michael Goeller]


Game Three

6.Bf4

Nadezhda Azarova (2281) - Antoaneta Stefanova (2502) [C55]

Turin olympiad women (12) 2006


1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. Bc4 Nf6 4. d4 exd4 5. e5 Ng4 6. Bf4 d6

 










An interesting alternative (for those seeking a more consistent approach to this system) is 6... f6!? 7. O-O (7. exf6 d5 (7... Nxf6 8. O-O d5 9. Bb5 Bg4=) 8. Qe2+ Kf7 9. Ng5+ Kxf6) 7... fxe5 8. Nxe5 (8. Re1 Bb4 9. c3 d5) 8... Ngxe5 9. Bxe5 Nxe5 10. Re1 Qf6 11. Qxd4 Kd8 12. Qxe5 (12. Rxe5? Bd6 13. Re4 Qxd4 14. Rxd4 Be5) 12... Qxe5 13. Rxe5 Be7 14. Nc3 Bf6 15. Re2 c6 16. Rd1 Kc7 17. Rde1 d5 18. Bd3 Bd7 19. h3 g6 20. g4 Rhe8 21. f4 Rxe2 22. Rxe2 Kd6 23. Nd1 Rf8 24. c3 Bd8 25. f5 gxf5 26. Ne3 Bb6 27. Kg2 Bxe3 28. Rxe3 fxg4 29. hxg4 Rg8 30. Rg3 Rxg4 31. Rxg4 Bxg4 32. Bxh7 Ke5 0-1 Eren, B-Netzer,J (2043)/Balatonlelle 2001 (43).

 

7. exd6

7. Bb5 dxe5 8. Nxe5 Ngxe5 9. Bxe5 Bd7 10. Bg3 Bb4+ 11. c3 Qe7+ 12. Be2 dxc3 13. Nxc3 O-O-O 14. O-O Bxc3 15. bxc3 Bf5 0-1 Lodes,H (2151)-Georgiev,V (2530)/Nuernberg 2009 (36).

.

7... Bxd6 8. Qe2+ Kf8 9. Bxd6+ Qxd6 10. O-O

10. h3 Nge5 11. Nbd2 Nxc4 12. Nxc4 Qb4+ 13. Ncd2 Bxh3 14. O-O Bg4 15. Qe4 h5 16. Nb3 Re8 17. Qd3 Bxf3 18. Qxf3 Rh6 0-1 Panchenko,A-Vladimirov,E/Cheliabinsk 1981 (35).

 

10... Bd7 11. Nbd2 Re8 12. Qd3 Nge5 13. Nxe5 Nxe5 14. Qb3 Bc6 15. Rfe1 h5 16. Rad1 Rh6 17. Ne4? Qe7

17... Qg6! 18. f3 (18. Rxd4 Nxc4 19. Rxc4 f5) 18... d3!! 19. Kf1 (19. Kh1 Nxf3! 20. gxf3 Rxe4) (19. cxd3? Nxf3+) 19... Nxc4 20. Qxc4 Bxe4 21. fxe4 dxc2 22. Qxc2 Qb6.

 

18. Bd5 Rg6 19. h3? Bxd5

0-1

[Michael Goeller]


Game Four

6.O-O Be7!? 7.Bf4 g5!

Daniel Hersvik (2080) - Roy Harald Fyllingen (2405) [C55]

Troll Masters/Gausdal (8) 1999


1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. Bc4 Nf6 4. d4 exd4 5. e5 Ng4 6. O-O  Be7

A very interesting and relatively rare idea -- one of many to be found in Schuyler's excellent book.

 

7. Bf4 g5!

A daring "Black jet" attack.

 

 

8. Nxg5

Black has even more fun against 8. Bg3?! when he can get his pawns rolling by 8... h5! 9. h3 (9. Nxd4 h4 10. Qxg4 d5 11. e6 hxg3 12. fxg3 dxc4 13. Nxc6 bxc6 14. exf7+ Kf8 15. Qxc4 Qd5) 9... h4 10. Bh2?! (Black is still better after 10. Bxh4 gxh4 11. hxg4 d5 [11... h3 12. gxh3 Rxh3] 12. exd6 Qxd6 13. Bb5 Bxg4 14. Qxd4 Rg8 15. Qxd6 cxd6 16. Nbd2 O-O-O or 10. hxg4?! hxg3 11. fxg3 d5!) 10... Nxh2 11. Kxh2 d6 12. Bb5 (12. Nxd4 Nxe5) 12... dxe5 13. Nxe5 Qd6 14. f4 Be6 (14... gxf4 15. Re1 Be6) 15. c4? gxf4 16. Qf3 Kd8 (16... Kf8!) 17. Nxc6+ bxc6 18. Bxc6 Rb8 19. b3 Rg8 20. Nd2 Rg3! 21. c5 Qxc5 22. Rfc1 Rxf3 23. Rxc5 Rxh3+ 24. gxh3 Bxc5 25. Ne4 Rb6 26. Ba4 Bd6 27. Rd1 Be5 28. Ng5 Ke7 29. Nf3 f6 30. Nxd4 Rd6 31. Nc6+ Kf8 32. Rxd6 Bxd6 33. Nd4 f3+ 34. Kh1 Bd5 0-1 Zarkovic,D (2095)-Peric,J/Tivat 2001/[Goeller,Michael].

 

8... d5!

Black tries to get the most out of the position.

 

Safe equality can be had by the forcing 8... Bxg5 9. Qxg4 d5 10. Qxg5 Qxg5 11. Bxg5 dxc4 and the bishops of opposite color and unbalanced pawns provide chances for both sides, e.g.: 12. Nd2 h6 13. Bf6 (13. Bh4 Bf5 14. Nxc4 Bxc2) 13... Rg8 14. f3 Be6 15. Ne4 Nb4

 

9. e6?

White probably must try the risky piece sacrifice 9. exd6!? Bxg5 (9... cxd6? 10. Nxf7) 10. dxc7 Qf6 which "doesn't give White enough for the piece" according to Schuyler, but it is still surprisingly complex after 11. Bg3 (11. Re1+ Kf8 12. Bxg5? Qxf2+!) 11... O-O 12. Nd2 Bf4 13. h3 Nge5

 

9... Bxg5

9... dxc4 10. Qxg4 Bxg5 11. Bxg5 Bxe6 12. Re1 Qd5

 

10. Qxg4 Bxe6 11. Qxg5

11. Bxg5 Bxg4 12. Bxd8 Rxd8 13. Re1+ Kf8 14. Bd3 Nb4

 

11... Qxg5 12. Bxg5 dxc4 13. f4

13. Nd2 Rg8

 

13... Rg8 14. Na3 Bd5 15. g3 a6 16. Rad1 Rg6

In order to drive the bishop away from the g-file with h6 or f6.

 

17. c3 d3 18. Rfe1+ Kd7

18... Kf8

 

19. Nc2 h6! 20. Bh4 Bf3 21. Rd2 Re6 22. Rxe6 Kxe6 23. Ne3 b5 24. Kf2 Be4 25. g4 f5 26. h3 h5!? 27. gxh5 Rh8 28. Bg5 Rxh5 29. h4 Ne7 30. Nf1 Nd5 31. Ng3 Rh7 32. h5 c5 33. a3 a5 34. Rd1 b4

0-1

[Michael Goeller]


Game Five

6.O-O Be7 7.Re1

Dragoljub Velimirovic (2500) - Leonid Stein (2620) [C55]

YUG-URS/Ohrid MKD (4) 1972


1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. Bc4 Nf6 4. d4 exd4 5. e5 Ng4 6. O-O Be7 7. Re1 d6

I don't know if Black can get away with 7...f6!? here.

 

 

8. e6?

Schuyler analyzes 8. exd6 cxd6! (8... Qxd6 is the only move you find Black playing in database games, but then White can gain a clear edge with 9. b3! O-O 10. Ba3 Qd8 11. Bxe7 Nxe7 12. Qxd4 according to Schuyler) 9. Nxd4 (9. h3?! Nge5 10. Bd5 Qb6) 9... O-O 10. Nc3 (10. h3 d5!? 11. Nxc6 bxc6 12. hxg4 dxc4 Schuyler) 10... Bh4!? (10... Bf6 11. Nf3 (11. Ndb5? Be5) 11... Nge5=) 11. g3 Bf6 12. Ndb5 a6 13. Nxd6 Nxf2!? 14. Nxf7 Qxd1 15. Nxd1 Nxd1 16. Nd6+ Kh8 17. Nf7+ Kg8= Schuyler. I strongly recommend that you consult Schuyler's book for the complete analysis of this complex line, which is certainly equal -- but only with best play by White!

 

8... fxe6

8... Bxe6?! 9. Bxe6 fxe6 10. Nxd4 Nxd4 11. Qxd4 Nf6 12. Rxe6

 

9. Bxe6

9. Nxd4 Nxd4 10. Qxd4 Ne5

 

9... Bxe6 10. Rxe6 O-O 11. Re4 Qd7

11... Nce5! 12. Qxd4 Nxf3+ 13. gxf3 Ne5

 

12. h3 Nf6 13. Re2 d5 14. Nxd4 Bc5 15. Be3 Rae8 16. Nc3 Bb6 17. Nxc6 bxc6 18. Na4?! Bxe3 19. fxe3 Ne4 20. Qd4 Ng3 21. Rd2 Nf5 22. Qxa7 Nxe3 23. Re2 d4 24. Qc5 Rf5 25. Qb4 Ref8 26. c3 c5 27. Nxc5? Qd6

27... Rf1+! 28. Rxf1 Rxf1+ 29. Kh2 Ng4+ 30. Kg3 (30. hxg4 Qd6+ 31. g3 Qh6+ 32. Kg2 Qh1#) 30... Qd6+ 31. Kh4 (31. Kxg4 Qf4+ 32. Kh5 g6#) 31... Qh6+ 32. Kg3 Qf4+ 33. Kh4 Nf6+ 34. g4 g5#

 

28. Rxe3 dxe3 29. Qc4+ Kh8 30. Ne4 Qf4 31. Qd3 Re5

0-1

[Michael Goeller]


Game Six

6.Qe2 Qe7 7.Bf4 f6 8.exf6 Qxe2+ 9.Kxe2

Denis Gjuran (2309) - Ilya Khmelniker (2469) [C55]

Bled open/Bled (4) 2008


1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. Bc4 Nf6 4. d4 exd4 5. e5 Ng4 6. Qe2 Qe7 7. Bf4 f6

Faced with the threat of 8.h3, Black has to challenge the center. This move leads to more unbalanced positions than the similarly motivated 7... d6 8. exd6 cxd6 which tends to favor White slightly.

 

8. exf6 Qxe2+

This exchange of Queens reduces the possible lines that need to be examined and yields good positions for Black. However, in their article on the line, "Fighting for the Centre with f7-f6" (NIC Yearbook #69, 2003) , Krysztof Panczyk and Jacek Ilczuk claimed that swapping queens is "premature, " arguing that "Neither White nor Black should hurry to swap queens -- it only accelerates the opponent's development," and this view has become part of the dogma of the line, reducing the number of games with an early swap. But the swap is good.

 

9. Kxe2

The most common recapture. See the next game for 9. Bxe2.

 

9... gxf6!

 










A suggestion of Sveshnikov's, which Schuyler makes his main line. There have been a few games with this move, so Schuyler is incorrect to say that it is "brand new, never been opened, still in its original packaging."

 

10. Nbd2

The standard move in such positions. White can also grab a pawn at c7, but as usual that allows Black to mobilize his forces with threats against the wayward prelate:

10. Bxc7 Nge5 (10... d6! 11. Bb5 Bd7 12. Bxc6 bxc6 13. Nxd4 c5) 11. Bxe5 fxe5 12. c3 Bg7 13. Nbd2 (13. cxd4! exd4 (13... e4!? 14. Ng5 Nxd4+ 15. Kd2) 14. Nbd2) 13... dxc3 14. bxc3 Ne7 15. Ne4 d5 16. Bb5+ Nc6 17. Nc5 O-O 18. Ng5 Rf6 19. Rad1 h6 20. Nh3 Ne7 21. f3 Bxh3 22. gxh3 Rc8 23. Nd7 Rg6 24. Rc1 a6 0-1 Sagafos,M (2208) -Gausel,E (2520)/Nordic Ch Bergen 2001.

 

10... Nge5 11. Bb5 d6

Black returns the pawn but is able to finish his development with the more solid position.

11... Kf7!? 12. Bxc6 Nxc6 13. Bxc7 b6 14. Bg3 Ba6+ 15. Kd1 Re8

 

12. Nxd4 Bd7 13. N2f3 a6 14. Bxc6 bxc6

Black's two bishops and open files more than compensate for his damaged structure.

 

15. Nh4 Ng6

A neat move, which stops White from occupying f5 while also improving Black's pawn structure.

 

16. Nxg6 hxg6 17. Kd2 Kf7 18. h4 Rh5 19. c3 c5 20. Nc2 Be7 21. g3 Rb8 22. b3 Rd5+ 23. Ke2 Rh8 24. c4 Rdh5 25. Rhe1 g5 26. hxg5 fxg5 27. Be3 Bf6 28. Rac1 Bg4+ 29. Kd2 Rd8 30. Rh1 d5 31. Rxh5 dxc4+ 32. Ke1 Bxh5 33. bxc4 Bf3!

Locking White's king to the back rank, where it will be subject to attack by the Rook along the h-file.

 

34. Bd2 Bb2 35. Rb1 Rh8! 36. Ne3 Bd4 37. Rc1 Kg6 38. Nf1 Rh1 39. Be3? Bb2! 40. Rb1 Bc3+ 41. Bd2

 










41... Bd4?!

Immediately winning was 41... Bg2!

 

42. Ba5?

White might hold now with 42. Rc1

 

42... Be4! 43. Rd1 g4 44. Kd2 Bxf2 45. Bxc7 Bg2 46. Ke2 Bxg3! 47. Bxg3 Bf3+ 48. Kf2 Bxd1 49. Nh2 Bf3

0-1

[Michael Goeller]


Game Seven

6.Qe2 Qe7 7.Bf4 f6 8.exf6 Qxe2+ 9.Bxe2

Kjetil A Lie (2536) - Magnus Carlsen (2710) [C55]

Tromso (8) 2007


1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. Bc4 Nf6 4. d4 exd4 5. e5 Ng4 6. Qe2 Qe7 7. Bf4 f6! 8. exf6 Qxe2+ 9. Bxe2

The more common 9.Kxe2 is considered in the previous game.

 

9... Nxf6

The most common move and probably best here. After all, it was the choice of young Magnus!

 










10. Nbd2

a) 10. O-O d6 11. Re1 (11. Bb5 Bd7 12. Re1+ Be7 13. Nbd2 a6 14. Bxc6 bxc6 15. Re2 Kf7 16. Nxd4 Nd5 17. Bg3 Bf6 0-1 Soraas, T (2155) -Stefanova,A (2481)/Tromso 2007 (29) and, as usual, the two Bishops give Black the edge.) 11... Be7 12. Na3 Bg4 (12... Nd5) 13. Nb5 Nd5 14. Bg3 Kd7 15. Nbxd4 Nxd4 16. Nxd4 Bxe2 17. Rxe2 Bf6 18. Rd1 Rhe8 19. Rxe8 Rxe8 20. Kf1 a6 21. c4 Nb4 22. a3 Bxd4 23. Rxd4 Nc2 24. Rd1 Kc6 25. Rc1 Nd4 26. b4 Nb3 27. Rd1 b5 28. cxb5+ Kxb5 29. Bf4 Ka4 30. Bc1 Re4 31. Bb2 g6 32. Rd3 Rh4 33. h3 Rc4 34. Rc3 Nd2+ 35. Ke2 Rxc3 36. Bxc3 Ne4 37. Bb2 Kb3 38. Bc1 Kc2 39. Be3 c5 40. bxc5 dxc5 41. f4 c4 42. g4 c3 43. Bd4 Nd6 44. a4 a5 45. h4 Nc4 46. f5 gxf5 47. gxf5 Kb3 48. Kd1 Nb2+ 49. Ke2 c2 50. Be3 Nxa4 0-1 Bernat,R (2140) -Ciolac,G (2375)/Szeged HUN 1998.

 

b) 10. Bxc7 d6 11. Bb5 Bd7! (11... Kd7?! 12. Ba5) 12. Bxc6 Bxc6 13. Nxd4 Bxg2 14. Rg1 Bd5?! (14... Bh3! suggests Schuyler) 15. Nc3 Kd7 16. Nxd5 Nxd5 17. Ba5 Re8+ 18. Kf1 g6= 1/2-1/2 Stranz,R (2272)-Neumeier,K (2305)/Austria T Ch 2004 (36).

 

10... d6

10... Nd5!? 11. Bg3 Ncb4 12. Nxd4 c5 13. a3 cxd4 14. axb4 Nxb4 15. O-O-O d3 16. cxd3 d5 17. Rhe1 Be7 18. Bf1 Kf7 19. Nf3 Re8 20. Nd4 Bd7 21. Kb1 Bf6 22. Nf3 Bg4 (22... Ba4! 23. Rc1 Rec8) 23. Rxe8 Rxe8 24. Re1 Bf5 25. Rxe8 Kxe8 26. Ne1 Kd7 0-1 Erenburg,S (2310)-Postny,E (2260)/ Tel Aviv 1998 (55).

 

11. O-O-O Nh5!

Going after the two bishops is the best way to get a concrete edge even if White recovers the pawn.

 

12. Bg5

12. Bg3 Bd7 13. Nb3 Be7 14. Nbxd4 Nxd4 15. Nxd4 Nxg3 16. hxg3 O-O-O and Black's two bishops give him the edge.

 

12... h6 13. Bh4 g5 14. Nxd4 Nf4!

Black now wins the g2 pawn, which is at least good collateral.

 

15. Bb5 Bd7 16. Rhe1+ Be7 17. Bxc6 bxc6

Black gets the other bishop instead.

 

18. Bg3 Nxg2 19. Re4 c5

Perhaps 19... Kf7!? 20. Rg1 c5 21. Rxg2 cxd4 22. Rxd4 Bf6 23. Rc4 Rhc8 and though White has won back his pawn, his Rooks are poorly placed and Black has the two bishops.

 

20. Ne6 Bxe6 21. Rxe6

 










21... Nh4?!

21... Kf7! 22. Re2 Rhg8! (Preparing to exploit the opening of the g-file after Nh4/f4 Bxh4/ f4) 23. Ne4 Nf4 24. Bxf4 gxf4 25. f3 Rg6 26. c4 Rag8

 

22. Bxh4 gxh4 23. Re4

23. Rde1! Rh7 24. Ne4 Kd7 25. Nf6+ Bxf6 26. Rxf6=

 

23... Rh7 24. Nf3 h3?!

24... O-O-O! 25. Nxh4 (25. Rf4 Rg8) 25... Bg5+ 26. Kb1 Rf7

 

25. Ng1 Kd7 26. Nxh3 Rf7 27. Rg1 Raf8 28. Rg6 Rf6 29. Rg3 d5 30. Rd3 Rf5 31. c4 d4 32. f4 Bd6 33. Rf3 Rh5 34. Kc2 Rg8

34... Rh4 35. Kd3 Rf5 does not allow the Nf2 defense.

 

35. Kd3 Rg4 36. Nf2 Rgh4 37. h3 Rf5 38. Ng4!? h5 39. Nf2 Rfxf4 40. Rfxf4 Bxf4

A reasonable result. Although Black is up a pawn, his pawns are fixed on dark squares and separated, so White will be able to use his Knight to tie Black down to their defense.

 

1/2-1/2

[Michael Goeller]

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Copyright © 2013 by Michael Goeller

References

James Schuyler, The Dark Knight System (Everyman Chess 2013)

Krysztof Panczyk and Jacek Ilczuk, "Fighting for the Centre with f7-f6" NIC Yearbook #69 (2003).