Arthur Bernard Bisguier - James T. Sherwin [A46]

Torre Attack

New York, Rosenwald 1954-1955 /New York (5) 1955


1. d4 Nf6 2. Nf3 e6 3. Bg5

The Torre Attack.

 

3... c5!

The best response. 3... d5 4. c4 transposes to the Queen's Gambit.

 

4. e3 Qb6!?

Naturally putting pressure on the b2 pawn, left unprotected by White's early Bg5. But such early Queen sorties are dangerous for both players. At Moscow 1925, several players demonstrated against Torre himself the Queen's Indian / Hedgehog method of meeting the Torre: 4... cxd4 5. exd4 Be7 6. Nbd2 d6 7. c3 Nbd7 8. Bd3 b6 9. Qe2 (9. Nc4!? Bb7 10. Qe2 Qc7 11. O-O O-O 12. Rfe1 Rfe8 13. Rad1 Nf8= Torre-Lasker, Moscow 1925) 9... Bb7 10. O-O O-O= with a dynamic position for Black.

 

5. Nc3!?

a) 5. b3?! Ne4 6. Bf4 cxd4 7. Qxd4! (7. exd4 Bb4+ 8. Nbd2 Nc6 ) 7... Bb4+!? (7... Qa5+! 8. c3 d5 ) 8. c3 Nxc3 9. a3 Nc6 10. Qxg7 Nxb1+ 11. axb4 Qxb4+ 12. Ke2 Qb5+ 13. Ke1 Qb4+=

 

b) 5. Qc1 Ne4 6. Bf4 d5= is safest but yields White nothing.

5... Qxb2!

"Paying no heed to the old warning against capture of the QNP" writes Evans. Black probably must take the pawn sooner or later, and this game demonstrates that sooner is probably better. Less clear is 5... d5 6. dxc5!?

(White can also play more simply by 6. Rb1 Nc6 7. dxc5 Bxc5 8. Bd3 Bd7 (8... Bb4!?) 9. O-O Be7 10. e4 dxe4 11. Nxe4 Nb4 12. Ne5 Bc6 13. Bxf6 gxf6 14. Nxc6 Qxc6 15. Qh5 Nxd3 (15... >= f5! 16. Ng5 Bxg5 17. Qxg5 h6 18. Qg7 O-O-O! with compensation) 16. cxd3 h6 17. Rfe1 Rc8 18. d4 Rd8 19. Rbd1 Rd5 20. Qf3 Rg8 21. Rc1 Qd7 22. Nxf6+ Bxf6 23. Qxf6 1-0 Trifunovic,P-Guimard,C/Prague 1946 (32))

6... Qxb2! 7. Nb5 Qb4+ 8. Nd2 Qxc5!

(Similar should be 8... Na6!? 9. Rb1 Qxc5 10. Bd3 Be7 (10... Bd7 ) 11. Bf4 Nd7 12. Nf3 f6?! (12... O-O ) 13. Nfd4 Nf8 14. O-O e5 15. Bg3 Bd7 16. Nb3 Qb6 17. Nc3 Nb4 18. a3 Qc6 19. axb4 Qxc3 20. Nc5 Bxc5 21. Rb3 Bxb4 22. Rxc3 Bxc3 23. Qb1 b6 24. Qb3 d4 25. f4 exf4 26. Bxf4 Ne6 27. Bb5 Nxf4 28. Rxf4! O-O-O 29. Ba6+ Kb8 30. exd4 Bd2? 31. Rf2+- 1-0 Marshall,F-Steiner,L/Brno 1928 (31))

9. Bf4 Na6! 10. Be5 Bd7 11. Bd4 (11. Rb1!? ) 11... Qe7 12. Bxa7? Rxa7! 13. Nxa7 Qc5 and the Knight is trapped 14. c4 Qxa7-+ 0-1 Udovcic,M-Simonovic,B/Belgrade 1948 (37)

 

6. Nb5 Qb4+

The Queen must evacuate or be trapped at lower cost: 6... Na6? 7. Bxf6! (7. Rb1!?) 7... gxf6 8. a3! cxd4 (8... d5 9. Rb1 Qa2 10. Qc1+-) 9. Bc4!? (9. exd4 d5 10. Rb1 Qa2 11. Rb3+-) 9... dxe3 10. Ra2+-

 

7. c3

Probably best, though this is not the only move that has been tried:

a) 7. Nd2 Qa5!

(7... Na6? 8. c3 Qa5 9. Nc4 Qd8 10. Ncd6+ Bxd6 11. Nxd6+ Kf8 (11... Ke7? 12. Bxa6 Kxd6 13. dxc5+ Kxc5?? 14. Qd4+ Kc6 15. Qc4+ Kd6 16. Qb4+ Kc6 17. Bb5+ Kb6 18. Ba4+ Kc7 19. Qc5+ Kb8 20. Bf4+ e5 21. Bxe5+ d6 22. Qxd6+ Qxd6 23. Bxd6# 1-0 Rioseco,F-Bulgarini,M/Vina del Mar 1998 (23)) 12. Bxa6 bxa6 13. O-O Qc7 14. dxc5 (14. Qf3!+-) 14... Qxc5 15. Bxf6 gxf6 16. Qf3 Ke7 17. Qxa8 Kxd6 18. Rab1 Ke7 19. Rfd1 Rd8 20. Qe4+- 1/2-1/2 Trikaliotis,G-Skalkotas,N/Athens 1992 (43))

8. Bf4

(8. dxc5!? a6 9. Nd6+ (9. Bxf6 axb5!=) 9... Bxd6 10. Bxf6 Bf8! (10... Bxc5 11. Bxg7 ) 11. Bd4 Nc6 unclear)

8... Nd5! 9. Nd6+ Bxd6 10. Bxd6 cxd4 11. e4 (11. exd4 Qc3 ) 11... Ne3! the simplest way to advantage (11... Nf6!?) 12. fxe3 dxe3 13. Bd3 exd2+ 14. Qxd2 Qxd2+ 15. Kxd2 b6 16. a4 Nc6 17. Rhf1 f6 18. h4 Bb7 19. g4 Ne5 20. g5 Nf7! 21. Bf4 Ke7 22. gxf6+ gxf6 23. a5 e5 24. Be3 Nd6-+ 0-1 Garcia Padron,J-Eslon,J/Las Palmas 1991 (62)

 

b) 7. Qd2?! was played in the first game with this line, when White had some compensation for the pawn after 7... Qxd2+ 8. Nxd2 Na6 9. dxc5 Bxc5 10. Bxf6 gxf6 11. Ne4 Be7?! (11... Ke7! ) 12. Ned6+ Bxd6 13. Nxd6+ Ke7 14. O-O-O 0-1 Kostic,B-Vajda,A/Budapest 1921 (85)

7... Qa5 8. Nd2

Nor do White's alternatives at this move seem to yield an advantage:

a) 8. dxc5!? a6 (8... Bxc5 9. Nd2 d5 10. Nb3 Qb6 11. Bf4 ) 9. Nd6+ Bxd6 10. Bxf6 Bf8!=

 

b) 8. Bf4!? Nd5 9. Nd6+ Bxd6 10. Bxd6 Nxc3 (10... cxd4!? 11. Qxd4 f6! ) 11. Qd2 Nc6 12. dxc5 Ne4 13. Qxa5 Nxa5=

8... a6!

"A magnificent conception. Black will give up the Queen for three pieces" writes Evans. Trying to save the Queen is dangerous: 8... d5!? 9. Nb3! Qb6 10. Bf4 Na6 11. dxc5 Bxc5 12. Nxc5 Qxc5 13. Bd6 Evans

 

9. Nc4 Qxb5 10. Nd6+

10. Bxf6 gxf6 11. d5 exd5 12. Nd6+ Bxd6 13. Bxb5 axb5 14. Qxd5 Be7 seems a slight improvement for White over the game line.

 

10... Bxd6 11. Bxb5 axb5 12. Bxf6

12. Qf3!?

 

12... gxf6 13. O-O

13. Qb3 Rg8! 14. O-O b6

 

13... Be7

White now advances his pawns seeking to gain space and open up lines for his Rooks.

 

14. e4 d6 15. f4 b4 16. d5?!

Evans writes that 16. cxb4 "for better or worse must be played. White does not yet realize that it is he who must defend!" Against that move, Sherwin may have planned the interesting sacrifice 16... Nc6!? 17. dxc5 (17. d5 Nd4 ) 17... dxc5 18. bxc5 Bxc5+ 19. Kh1 h5!? with the idea of ...b6, ...Bb7, and ...h4 with very active pieces and a chance for a kingside initiative. (or 19... Bd4 20. Rc1 e5 )

 

16... bxc3 17. e5?!

"Do-or-die!" writes Evans. "Do-and-die" more like, but Bisguier recognized that once Black's pieces get coordinated it will be too late.

 

17... dxe5 18. fxe5 f5!

"Refuting White's entire strategy. Having locked the K-side, Black can now turn his attention toward his own initiative on the Q-side" writes Evans.

 

19. d6 Bd8 20. Qf3 Ra3 21. Qe3 Nc6 22. Qxc5 Ra5 23. Qxc3 Bb6+ 24. Kh1 Bd4 25. Qd2 Bxa1

"It is unfortunate that Black parts with this beautiful Bishop for material gain," Evans notes sardonically, but "the text wins with ease."

 

26. Rxa1 Rxe5 27. Qg5 Rd5 28. Qg7 Rf8 29. Qxh7 Rxd6 30. Qg7 Ke7 31. Re1 e5 32. h4 Rg6 33. Rxe5+

"Desperation." 33. Qh7 Rfg8-+

 

33... Nxe5 34. Qxe5+ Re6 35. Qc5+ Rd6 36. h5 b6 37. Qe5+ Be6

"Black will now eat up one pawn after another merely by doubling hs Rooks on them one by one."

 

38. h6 f6 39. Qg3 Rdd8 40. Qc7+ Rd7

"The end of time control, the reason for Black's earlier indecisiveness" notes Evans.

 

41. Qxb6 Rh8 42. Qe3 Kf7 43. a4 Bd5 44. Kg1 Kg6 45. a5 Rxh6 46. a6 Rh8 47. a7 Ra8 48. g4 fxg4 49. Qd3+ f5 50. Qa6+ Kg5 51. Qb6 Raxa7 52. Qe3+ Kg6 53. Kf2 Re7 54. Qd4 Ra2+ 55. Kf1 g3 56. Qc3 f4 57. Qd3+ Re4 58. Kg1 f3!

"This remarkable game illustrates the power of 3 pieces against a Queen. It is a study in relative values" concludes Evans.

 

0-1

 

by Michael Goeller, with some notes by Larry Evans from his book Trophy Chess (New York 1956).

Game in PGN