French Defense - Anti-Tarrasch

Botvinnik once remarked that a critical strategic issue in modern chess is how to deploy the Queen's Bishop... Nowhere is that more the issue than in his favorite French Defense, where the "French Bishop" at c8 is stuck behind the pawn chain from the moment Black plays ...e6. How is this Bishop to develop? Often Black's strategy revolves completely around this question. In the Fort Knox Variation Black plays 1.e4 e6 2.d4 d5 3.Nc3 dxe4 4.Nxe4 Bd7 5.Nf3 Bc6 immediately developing and soon exchanging the problem child. In one variation of the Winawer Black plays 1.e4 e6 2.d4 d5 3.Nc3 Bb4 4.e5 Qd7 (to meet Qg4 with ...f5) followed by ...Bxc3+, ...b6, and ...Ba6, disposing of the Bishop and having good pieces and good squares for the rest. And in the Wade Variation against the Advanced he plays 1.e4 e6 2.d4 d5 3.e5 c5 4.c3 Qb6 followed by (if White doesn't do something to get in the way) ...Bd7 and ...Bb5. In the following line of the Tarrasch, Black players have developed an interesting plan to liberate the Bishop by bringing it over to the Kingside (see diagram).

Position after 14.Bc2, showing Black's plan.

Though Black can also consider breaking quickly in the center with ...e5, this leads to a double-edged game and Black has had much more success with the Bishop maneuver. Indeed, if you play over the games below -- including Steve Stoyko's recent one with David Grasso from the Kenilworth CC vs. Roselle CC team match -- you will see that as soon as the Bishop emerges Black often can claim the initiative. Black's plan to develop the Bishop allows him to strongly coordinate his forces while White often has little sense of how to best deploy. Of course, White should work harder to control the e5 square by directing his pieces there. But there are few practical examples where White has followed the most correct course.

The following games are offered as an anti-Tarrasch repertoire focused around the planned Bishop development. Perhaps we can persuade Steve to build on this in a second series of lectures on the "French Bishop" (following his series on a 1.d4 d5 Black Repertoire).

Main Sample Game

David Grasso (2157) - Steve Stoyko (2333) [C06]

Roselle CC at Kenilworth CC/Kenilworth, NJ USA 2005


1. e4 e6 2. d4 d5 3. Nd2 Nf6 4. e5 Nfd7

4... Ne4!? 5. Nxe4 (5. Bd3 Nxd2 6. Bxd2 c5=) 5... dxe4 6. Bc4 a6 (6... c5 7. d5 ) 7. Be3 and the pawn at e4 is a long-term liability.

 

5. Bd3

The chief alternative, covered in the supplemental games, is 5. f4 c5 6. c3

 

5... c5 6. c3 Nc6 7. Ne2 cxd4

7... f6 8. exf6 (8. Nf4!?) 8... Qxf6!? 9. Nf3 cxd4 10. cxd4 Bb4+ transposes to the game line and is given in an old Chess Digest pamphlet I have on the French Defense as resulting "in a satisfactory position" for Black. Steve mentioned that this line is covered in an old Foxy Chess Openings video on the French.

 

8. cxd4 f6 9. exf6

9. Nf4 Nxd4 (9... Qe7=) 10. Qh5+ Ke7 11. Ng6+ hxg6 12. exf6+ Nxf6 13. Qxh8 e5

 

9... Qxf6

More common is 9... Nxf6 10. Nf3 Bd6 11. O-O O-O 12. Bf4 Bxf4 13. Nxf4 Ne4

 

10. Nf3 Bb4+!?

In his excellent repertoire book "The Chess Advantage in Black and White," Larry Kaufman says this move "merely helps White" by developing his Bishop. The truth is, though, that the Bishop at d2 hinders White. Ultimately, though, this move should be no different than 10...Bd6 -- but few players as White treat it that way.

a) 10... h6 is given as the main line here by Kaufman 11. O-O (11. Bf4!? Bb4+ 12. Kf1!~~) 11... Bd6 12. Ng3 O-O 13. Bc2 Rd8 14. Re1 Nf8 15. Ne5! Bd7 16. f4 Be8 17. Be3 "and the securely posted Knight assures White the advantage" he writes.

 

b) 10... Bd6 11. Bg5 Qf7 12. O-O O-O 13. Bh4! followed by Bg3 to exchange Black's dark-squared Bishop.

11. Bd2 Bd6

The Bishop check has slowed White from aligning his Queen and Bishop with Bc2 and Qd3.

 

12. O-O

Better 12. Bg5! Qf7 13. O-O O-O (13... e5!? unclear ) 14. Bh4 which basically transposes to the 10....Bd6 line that Kaufman gives. Most White players will want to try to use the tempo of the Bishop at d2 to their advantage, though, and likely would not consider 12.Bg5.

 

12... h6!

Shutting the door on Bg5. Black has time for this move because the Bishop at d2 slows White from setting up the battery of Bishop at c2 and Queen at d3 with threats against h7.

 

13. Bc3

A logical development to inhibit Black's typical ...e5 break. But Black has a different development in mind.

 

13... O-O 14. Bc2 Rd8

The beginning of what has become the standard method of freeing the Bishop at c8 by developing it via Bd7-e8-g6 or h5 once Black first plays Rd8 and Nf8.

 

15. Qd3 Nf8!

Just in time!

 

16. a3 Bd7 17. Rae1 Be8 18. Ne5?!

This pawn sac suggests that White has trouble finding good ideas. Though it does give White some activity, it ultimately favors Black. Better 18. Qe3 Bg6 19. Ba4 continuing the fight for e5.

 

18... Nxe5 19. dxe5 Bxe5 20. Bxe5 Qxe5 21. Nd4 Qf6 22. f4

>= 22. Qe3!

 

22... Bg6=/+ 23. f5 exf5 24. Nxf5 Qb6+! 25. Kh1 Rd7!

Black does have to be careful here: 26.Ne7+ is a threat. 25... Kh8!?

 

26. Re3?

Surrendering a second pawn for nebulous compensation. Better perhaps 26. Ba4! Rd6 27. Ne7+ Kh7 28. Nxg6 Nxg6 29. Be8!?

 

Not 26. Ne7+?? Rxe7!-+

 

26... Rc8

26... Qxb2-+

 

27. Ref3 Kh7 28. Qd2 Qxb2-+ 29. Nd4 Bxc2 30. R3f2 Qxa3

30... Rdc7!-+

 

31. Nxc2 Qc3 32. Qf4 Ng6 33. Qg4 Re7

and Black won on time in a clearly won position.

 

0-1

[Michael Goeller, based on comments by Steve Stoyko]


Supplemental Games

 

Ron Hermansen (2225) - John L Watson (2385) [C06]

American op/USA (6) 1996


1. e4 e6 2. d4 d5 3. Nd2 Nf6 4. e5 Nfd7 5. Bd3 c5 6. c3 Nc6 7. Ne2 cxd4 8. cxd4 f6 9. exf6 Qxf6 10. Nf3 h6 11. O-O Bd6 12. Bd2?! 12. Ng3 O-O 13. Bc2 Rd8 14. Re1 Nf8 15. Ne5 12... O-O 13. Bc3 Rd8 14. Bc2 Nf8 15. Nc1 Bd7 16. Nd3 Be8 17. Nfe5 Bxe5 18. Nxe5 Nxe5 1/2-1/2


Tomas Polak (2330) - Robert Tibensky (2385) [C06]

CSR-ch/Bratislava (10) 1991


1. e4 e6 2. d4 d5 3. Nd2 Nf6 4. e5 Nfd7 5. Bd3 c5 6. c3 Nc6 7. Ne2 cxd4 8. cxd4 f6 9. exf6 Qxf6 10. Nf3 h6 11. O-O Bd6 12. a3 O-O 13. Bc2 Rd8 14. Qd3 Nf8 Just in time to prevent the Queen's invasion. 15. Be3 Bd7 16. Qd2 Be8 17. Rad1 Bh5! With the liberation of the Queen's bishop, Black suddenly has the better pieces and the freer game. 18. Ne1 a6 19. f3 Bg6 20. Bb3 Rac8 21. Kh1 Bh7 22. Bf4 Be7 23. Bg3 Ng6 24. Nc2 Nh4 25. Ne3 Nf5 26. Ng4 Nxg3+ 27. Nxg3 Qg5 28. Qe2 Qg6 29. f4 Qf7 30. Ba2 Bh4? 31. Nxh6+! gxh6 32. Qg4+ Qg7 33. Qxh4 Nxd4 34. Nh5 Nf5 35. Qxd8+ Rxd8 36. Nxg7 Kxg7 37. Rfe1 Kf6 38. Bb1 h5 39. Kg1 Rg8 40. Kf2 Rd8 41. g3 Bg6 42. h3 d4 43. Kf3 Be8 44. g4 hxg4+ 45. hxg4 Ne7 46. Ba2 Rd6 47. Rxd4 Rxd4 48. Rxe6+ Kf7 49. Re4+ 1-0


Jozef Mokos - Robert Tibensky (2425) [C06]

SVK-ch/Topolcianky (4) 1993


1. e4 e6 2. d4 d5 3. Nd2 Nf6 4. e5 Nfd7 5. Bd3 c5 6. c3 Nc6 7. Ne2 cxd4 8. cxd4 f6 9. exf6 Qxf6 10. Nf3 h6 11. O-O Bd6 12. Nc3 O-O 13. a3 Rd8 14. Bc2 Nf8 15. Re1 Bd7 16. Be3 Rac8 17. Qd2 Be8 18. Bd1!? Ng6!? Taking advantage of White's passively placed pieces to bring this Knight to the fore. 19. g3 Nge7 20. Kg2 Nf5 21. h3 Bg6 22. Ne2 Bb8 23. Bf4 Nd6 24. Ne5 Nc4! 25. Nxc4 dxc4-/+ 26. Qe3 e5! A total triumph for Black's strategic play. 27. dxe5 Nxe5 28. Bxe5 Bxe5 29. Nf4 Bxf4 30. Qxf4 Qxf4 31. gxf4 Rd2 32. Re2 Rcd8 33. Rxd2 Rxd2 34. Rc1 Be4+ 35. Kg1 b5 36. b3 Rxd1+! 37. Rxd1 cxb3-+ 0-1


Zuzana Hagarova (2230) - Evgeny Gleizerov (2545) [C06]

Cappelle op/Cappelle la Grande (5) 1995


1. e4 e6 2. d4 d5 3. Nd2 Nf6 4. e5 Nfd7 5. c3 c5 6. Bd3 Nc6 7. Ne2 cxd4 8. cxd4 f6 9. exf6 Qxf6 10. Nf3 h6 11. O-O Bd6 12. Nc3 O-O 13. a3 Rd8 14. Bc2 Nf8 15. Re1 Bd7 16. Be3 Be8 17. Rc1 Bh5 White's play has been planless and his pieces have found no good squares, while Black has followed his scheme and now holds the edge due to his better pieces. 18. Bb1 Rd7! 19. Na4 Rf7 White cannot avoid getting a damaged kingside structure, resulting in weak pawns and an exposed king. 20. Nc5 Qe7 21. Nd3 Ng6 22. Qc2 Bxf3 23. gxf3 Rf5 23... Qh4!? 24. f4 Qg4+ 25. Kf1 Qh3+ 26. Ke2 Rc8-+ 24. f4 Qh4 25. Qe2 Bxf4 26. Nxf4 Nxf4 27. Bxf4 Nxd4-+ 28. Qe3 Rxf4 29. Kh1 Rxf2 30. Qe5 Qg4 0-1


Pawel Blehm (2210) - Evgeny Gleizerov (2545) [C06]

Cappelle op/Cappelle la Grande (7) 1995


1. e4 e6 2. d4 d5 3. Nd2 Nf6 4. e5 Nfd7 5. Bd3 c5 6. c3 Nc6 7. Ne2 cxd4 8. cxd4 f6 9. exf6 Qxf6 10. Nf3 h6 11. O-O Bd6 12. Be3 O-O 13. Ng3 Rd8 14. Rc1 Nf8 15. Bb1 Bd7 16. h3 Be8 17. Nh2 Bg6 18. f4 Bxb1 19. Rxb1 Qg6 20. Ng4 Ne7 21. Rc1 Nd7 22. Qc2 Qxc2 23. Rxc2 Rac8 24. Rcf2? 24. Rfc1= 24... Nf5 25. Nxf5 exf5 26. Ne5 Nf6! White's Knight at e5 merely looks strong, but Black's Knight threatens to become a monster! 27. g4!? fxg4 27... Ne4 28. Rg2~~ 28. Nxg4 Nxg4 29. hxg4 Re8! Gaining control of the two critical open files. 30. Rf3 30. Re2?! Re4 30... Re4 31. Kg2 Kf7 32. R1f2 Rce8 33. Bd2 Rxd4 34. Be3 Rd1 35. Bxa7 Ra8 36. Bb6 Rxa2 37. Rc2 d4-+ There is no stopping this pawn. 38. Rff2 d3 39. Rc4 d2 40. Rc2 0-1


Ioseb Kviriashvili (2270) - Evgeny Gleizerov (2540) [C06]

Berliner Sommer/Berlin (1) 1995


1. e4 e6 2. d4 d5 3. Nd2 Nf6 4. e5 Nfd7 5. Bd3 c5 6. c3 Nc6 7. Ne2 cxd4 8. cxd4 f6 9. exf6 Qxf6 10. Nf3 h6 11. O-O Bd6 12. a3 O-O 13. Bc2 Rd8 14. Qd3 Nf8 15. Ng3 Bd7 16. Bd2 Be8 17. Rac1 Bg6 18. Qe3! Rac8 19. Ba4! The battle for e5 continues. 19... Ne7!? 20. Ne5 Nf5 21. Nxf5 Bxf5 22. Ba5 b6 23. Bb4 Bxe5 24. dxe5 Qh4 25. Qg3!? 25. f4 25... Qd4 26. Rcd1 Qc4 27. Bb3 Qb5 28. Be7 Re8 29. a4 Qe2 30. Ba3 Bc2 31. Rde1 Qh5 32. h3 Ng6 33. Bxc2 Rxc2=/+ 34. b3 Rec8 35. Bb4 Qf5 36. Re3 Nf4 37. Kh2? d4! Black's passed d-pawn often plays a decisive role in the late middlegame or endgame. 38. Rf3 g5 39. Rd1 Qe4 40. Bd6 R8c3 41. Rxc3 Rxc3 42. Qg4 Rc2 43. Qg3 d3! 44. h4 Qe2-+ 0-1


Jorge Tejero Garces (2210) - Tal Shaked (2440) [C06]

Koop Tjuchem op/Groningen (1) 1996


1. e4 e6 2. d4 d5 3. Nd2 Nf6 4. e5 Nfd7 5. c3 c5 6. Bd3 Nc6 7. Ne2 cxd4 8. cxd4 f6 9. exf6 Qxf6 10. Nf3 h6 11. O-O Bd6 12. Nc3 O-O 13. a3 Rd8 14. Re1 Nf8 15. b4 This is an interesting plan to gain space on the queenside while cementing control over e5. 15... Bd7 16. Bb2 Be8 17. b5 Na5 18. Ne5+/= Ng6 19. Ne2 Rac8 20. Rc1 Bxe5 21. dxe5 Qg5 22. g3? 22. Rxc8 Rxc8 22... Nc4! 23. Bd4 Ncxe5 24. Rxc8 Nf3+! 25. Kh1 Rxc8 25... Qh5! 26. Bxg6 26. Ng1 26... Bxg6-+ 27. Rf1? Be4 0-1


Alex Verlaine - Gregor Karer [C06]

EU-ch U16/Tallinn (4) 1997


1. e4 e6 2. d4 d5 3. Nd2 Nf6 4. e5 Nfd7 5. Bd3 c5 6. c3 Nc6 7. Ne2 cxd4 8. cxd4 f6 9. exf6 Qxf6 10. Nf3 h6 11. O-O Bd6 12. Nc3 a6 13. Re1 O-O 14. Be3 Rd8 15. Qe2 Nf8 16. Rad1 Bd7 17. Bb1 Be8 18. Bc1 Bh5!=/+ 19. Be3 Rac8 20. h3 Bxf3 21. Qxf3 Qxf3 22. gxf3 Black has a long-term advantage due to the permanently damaged White kingside. 22... Rd7 23. f4 Ne7 Restraining f5 24. Re2 Nfg6? Letting White back in the game. 25. Bxg6! Nxg6 26. f5! exf5 27. Nxd5 Bh2+! At least Black will emerge with the better minor piece and fewer pawn islands. 28. Kxh2 Rxd5 29. Rd3? White may be able to put up a defense after 29. Kg3 29... f4! 30. Bd2 Rc2 31. Re6 Kf7 32. Rb6 Ne5 33. Rxb7+ Kg8 34. Rc3 Rxd2 35. dxe5 Rxf2+ 36. Kg1 Re2 37. Kf1 Rexe5 38. Rcc7 Rg5 39. Kf2 Rg3 40. Rb8+ Kh7 41. Rf7 Rxh3 42. Rxf4 Rd2+ 43. Ke1 Rhh2-+ 44. Ra4 Rc2 45. Kd1 Rcg2 46. Re4 Rxb2 47. Rxb2 Rxb2 48. Ra4 Rb6 49. Kc2 h5 50. Kc3 g5 51. Ra5 Kg6 52. Kd4 h4 53. Ra3 g4 54. Ke4 Rf6 55. Rc3 h3 56. Rc8 h2 0-1


Alexander Sokolov (2350) - Evgeny Gleizerov (2545) [C06]

RUS-Cup7/Kstovo (1) 1997


1. e4 e6 2. d4 d5 3. Nd2 Nf6 4. e5 Nfd7 5. c3 c5 6. Bd3 Nc6 7. Ne2 cxd4 8. cxd4 f6 9. exf6 Qxf6 10. Nf3 h6 11. O-O Bd6 12. Nc3 O-O 13. a3 Rd8 14. Re1 Nf8 15. Be3 Bd7 16. Qe2 Be8 17. Rad1 Bh5! There is no need to blunt White's Bishop at d3 since it is making no threats -- so the Bishop can assume a more aggressive stance. 18. h3 Rd7 Threatening ...Rf7 19. g4[] Bg6 20. Bc1 Rf7-> 21. Kg2 Bxd3 22. Rxd3 Ng6 23. Nb5? 23. Kg1 23... Bf4!-+ White will not be able to avoid a nasty fork at f4 following the exchange of Bishops. 0-1


Leonid Yurtaev (2495) - Evgeny Gleizerov (2545) [C06]

RUS-Cup7/Kstovo (3) 1997


1. e4 e6 2. d4 d5 3. Nd2 Nf6 4. e5 Nfd7 5. Bd3 c5 6. c3 Nc6 7. Ne2 cxd4 8. cxd4 f6 9. exf6 Qxf6 10. Nf3 h6 11. Nc3 Bd6 12. Nb5 Bb8 13. Be3 O-O 14. Rc1 Rd8 15. Bb1 Nf8 16. O-O Bd7 17. h3 Be8 18. Nh2 Bxh2+! 18... Bg6 19. Ng4 19. Kxh2 Bg6= 1/2-1/2


Holger Proehl (2365) - Evgeny Gleizerov (2540) [C06]

Berliner Sommer/Berlin (3) 1995


1. e4 e6 2. d4 d5 3. Nd2 Nf6 4. e5 Nfd7 5. Bd3 c5 6. c3 Nc6 7. Ne2 cxd4 8. cxd4 f6 9. exf6 Qxf6 10. Nf3 h6 11. a3 Bd6 12. Bc2 O-O 13. Qd3 Rd8 13... e5!? 14. Qh7+ Kf7 15. Bb3 Nb6~~ 14. h4 14. Qh7+ Kf7 15. O-O Nf8 16. Qd3 Kg8 17. Nc3 Bd7 18. Nb5 Bb8 19. Be3 Be8 14... Nf8 14... e5!? 15. g4 e5 16. g5 hxg5 17. Bxg5 e4 18. Bxf6 exd3 19. Bxd8 19. Rg1! 19... dxe2 20. Bg5 Bg4 21. Ng1 Nxd4 22. Bd3 Nfe6 23. Be3 Nf4 24. Bxd4? 24. Bxf4 Bxf4 25. h5! threatening Rh4 with a triple skewer might get White back in the game. 24... Nxd3+ Decisively winning the Exchange. 25. Kd2 e1=Q+ 26. Rxe1 Nxe1 27. Kxe1 Rc8 28. f3 Bxf3 29. Rh3 Bg4 30. Rd3 Rc1+ 31. Kf2 Rc2+ 32. Kf1 a6 33. b4 Bf5 34. Re3 Rc4 35. Ne2 Bg4 36. Rd3 Be7 37. Nc3 Bf5 38. Rd2 Be6 39. Be5 Rxh4 40. Nxd5 Bxd5 41. Rxd5 Rh5 42. Ra5 Rf5+ 43. Kg2 b6 44. Rxa6 Rxe5 45. Rxb6 Re2+ 46. Kf3 Ra2 47. Ke4 Rxa3 48. Kd5 Kf7 49. b5 Rc3 50. Rb7 g5 51. b6 Rc5+ 52. Kd4 Rb5 53. Kc4 Rb4+ 54. Kd5 g4 55. Kc6 g3 56. Ra7 g2 57. Ra1 Bf6 58. Rg1 Rxb6+ 0-1


Veniamen Shtyrenkov (2465) - Robert Tibensky (2425) [C06]

Sala op/Sala (8) 1993


1. e4 e6 2. d4 d5 3. Nd2 Nf6 4. e5 Nfd7 5. c3 c5 6. Bd3 Nc6 7. Ne2 cxd4 8. cxd4 f6 9. exf6 Qxf6 10. Nf3 h6 11. O-O Bd6 12. Bc2 O-O 13. Qd3 Rd8 13... Nb4?! 14. Qh7+ Kf7 15. Bd1~~ 14. Be3 14. Qh7+ Kf7 15. Be3 Nf8 16. Qd3 Kg8= 14... Nf8 15. Qd2 Bd7 16. Bf4 Be8 17. Bxd6 Rxd6 18. Ng3 Bg6 19. Ba4 Be4 20. Bxc6 Bxf3 21. Ba4 Bg4 22. Rfe1 Rdd8 23. Bc2 Qf7 24. h3 Bh5 25. Nxh5 Qxh5 26. Re5 Qf7 27. Rae1 Rd6 28. Qe3 Rc8 29. Bd1 Qf6 30. f4 g6 31. g4 Rc7 32. g5 Qg7 33. Bg4 Rcc6 34. h4 h5 35. Bh3 Qc7 36. Qf2 Qb6 37. R5e2 Rc4 38. Rd2 Qa5 39. b3 Rc3 40. Bf1 Qc7 41. Kg2 Rdc6 42. Bb5 Rb6 43. Bd3 Rbc6 1/2-1/2


Oleg Korneev (2465) - Rainer Knaak (2505) [C06]

Bad Woerishofen op/Bad Woerishofen (5) 1992


1. e4 e6 2. d4 d5 3. Nd2 Nf6 4. e5 Nfd7 5. Bd3 c5 6. c3 Nc6 7. Ne2 cxd4 8. cxd4 f6 9. exf6 Qxf6 10. Nf3 Bd6 11. O-O h6 12. Bc2 O-O 13. Qd3 Rd8 Can Black get away with allowing the check at h7? Apparently both players think he can! 14. a3 14. Qh7+ Kf7 15. a3 Nf8 16. Qd3 Kg8 essentially returns us to the game line. 14... Nf8 15. b4 Bd7 16. Bb2 b5 17. Bc3 Be8 18. Qe3 Bg6= 19. Bb3 Nd7 20. Rae1 Re8 21. Ng3 Bf4 22. Qe2 a6 23. Ne5 Ndxe5 24. dxe5 Qg5 25. Bb2 Rad8-/+ 26. Nh1 Bh5 27. f3 d4 28. Nf2 Qh4 29. Nh3 Be3+ 30. Kh1 Nxe5 31. Qc2 Bxf3 32. gxf3 Qxh3 33. Qe4 Nf7 34. f4 Nd6 35. Qe5 Nc4 36. Bxc4 bxc4-+ 37. Rg1 Bxg1 38. Rxg1 Qf3+ 39. Rg2 Qd1+ 40. Rg1 Qf3+ 41. Rg2 Re7 42. Qf6 Qxg2+ 0-1


Paul Wallace (2220) - Stephen Giddins (2355) [C06]

BCF-chT 9697/England 1996


1. e4 e6 2. d4 d5 3. Nd2 Nf6 4. e5 Nfd7 5. Bd3 c5 6. c3 Nc6 7. Ne2 cxd4 8. cxd4 f6 9. exf6 Qxf6 10. Nf3 h6 11. O-O Bd6 12. Nc3 O-O 13. a3 Rd8 14. Bc2 Nf8 15. b4 Bd7 16. Re1 Rac8 17. Bb2 Be8 18. b5 Na5 The best place for the Knight - heading for c4. 19. Ne5 Nc4 20. Nxc4 Rxc4 21. Ne2 Bg6 In almost all of these games, as soon as this Bishop lands on g6 or h5 Black has the better game! 22. Bb3 Rc7 23. Ng3 Bf4 To keep White from challenging on the c-file. 24. Nf1 Rdc8 25. Ne3 Blocking the diagonal. 25... Be4!? Provoking f3 to weaken the Knight's support. 26. f3 Bg6 26... Qh4! 27. h3 (27. g3 Bxg3) 27... Qg5 (27... Bh7!?-> followed by Qg3) 28. fxe4 Bxe3+ 29. Kh1 Bd2 keeps control of the c-file and maintains threats on the kingside. 27. Rc1 Rxc1 28. Bxc1 Rc3 29. Ng4 Qg5 30. Bxf4 Qxf4 31. Ne5 Bf5 32. g3 Qg5 33. f4 Qe7 White has gotten his Knight to a strong square, but his many pawn and square weaknesses are his downfall. 34. g4 Be4! 35. f5? Desperation. 35... Qxa3! 36. fxe6 Nxe6 37. Rxe4 Rc1!-+ Winning the Queen always makes things easy. 38. Re1 Rxd1 39. Bxd1 Qb2 40. Nf3 Nf4 0-1


Jesus Baron Rodriguez (2270) - Tal Shaked (2440) [C06]

Wch U18/Menorca (2) 1996


1. e4 e6 2. d4 d5 3. Nd2 Nf6 4. e5 Nfd7 5. c3 c5 6. Bd3 Nc6 7. Ne2 cxd4 8. cxd4 f6 9. exf6 Qxf6 10. Nf3 h6 11. O-O Bd6 12. Bb1 O-O 13. Qd3 Rd8 14. g3?! e5! This central break is especially strong now that White has weakened the light squares on the kingside. The Bishop on b1 also blocks the Rook at a1 and slows White's play on the opened central files. 15. dxe5 15. Qh7+ Kf7 16. dxe5 Ncxe5 17. Nxe5+ Bxe5 15... Ndxe5 16. Nxe5 Bxe5 17. Nf4 Nd4 18. Qh7+ Kf7 19. Qg6+ Qxg6 20. Bxg6+ Kf6 21. Bd3 Bf5 The passed d-pawn is a monster in this ending. 22. Be3 Nf3+ 23. Kg2 Be4!? Allowing White to eliminate the passer -- but Black still has the more active pieces. 24. Bxe4 dxe4 25. Rac1 Rac8 26. Bxa7 Rxc1 27. Rxc1 g5 28. Nh3 Bxb2 29. Rc4 Ke5 30. Rc5+ Rd5 31. Ng1 g4 32. h3 h5 33. Ne2 Rxc5 34. Bxc5 Ne1+ 35. Kh2 Nf3+ 36. Kg2 Kd5 37. Be3 Be5 38. Bf4 Ne1+ 39. Kh2 Nf3+? 39... b5! 40. Kg2 b5 41. Bxe5 Kxe5 42. h4 b4 43. Kf1 1/2-1/2


H. Mayer - Miguel Alcala Cuesta [C06]

USA-op Los Angeles/Los Angeles 1991


1. e4 e6 2. d4 d5 3. Nd2 Nf6 4. e5 Nfd7 5. c3 c5 6. Bd3 Nc6 7. Ne2 cxd4 8. cxd4 f6 9. exf6 Qxf6 10. Nf3 Bd6 11. O-O O-O 12. Bg5 Qf7 13. Bh4 Nf6 14. Bg3 Bxg3 15. Nxg3 Qc7 16. Bb5 Bd7 17. Bxc6 Bxc6 18. Qb3 Nd7 19. Rfe1 Rae8 20. Ne5 Nxe5 21. Rxe5 g6 22. Qe3 Rf6 23. Re1 Qf7 24. h4!? 24. f3 24... h5 25. Nf1 Rf4 26. Nd2 Rxh4 27. g3 Rg4 28. f3?? Rxg3+ 29. Kh2 h4 30. Re2? Qf6 31. Rf2 Rf8 32. Re2 Qf4 33. Qxf4 Rxf4 34. R2e3 Bd7 35. Ra3 a6 36. Rb3 Bc6 37. Rc3 Kh7 38. b3 Kh6 39. a4 Rxd4 40. Nf1 Rg5 41. Rxe6 Rd1 42. Ne3 Rd2+ 0-1


Peter Acs (2440) - Hoang Thanh Trang (2360) [C06]

Budapest FS04 GM/Budapest (5) 1996


1. e4 e6 2. d4 d5 3. Nd2 Nf6 4. e5 Nfd7 5. c3 c5 6. Bd3 Nc6 7. Ne2 cxd4 8. cxd4 f6 9. exf6 Qxf6 10. Nf3 h6 11. O-O Bd6 12. Ng3 O-O 13. Bc2 Rd8 14. Re1 Nf8 15. Ne5 White's knight play prevents Black's planned Bishop redeployment. The game now enters a phase of tactical maneuvering. 15... Qh4 16. Nf3?! 16. f4! Kaufman 16... Qf6 17. Nh5 Qf7 18. Ne5 Nxe5 19. dxe5 Bc5 20. Nf4 Bd7 21. Nd3 Bb6 22. a4 a6 23. Be3 d4! 24. Bf4 Bc6 The light-squared Bishop finds a good diagonal and suddenly things become more balanced. 25. Qg4 Qg6! 26. Qxg6 Nxg6 27. Bb3 Kf7= 28. Bd2 Nh4 29. f3 g5 30. Kf2 Nf5 31. Bb4 Ne3 32. Bc5?! 32. Bd2!~~ 32... Bxc5 33. Nxc5 Bd5=/+ 34. Rec1 b5?! 34... >= Rac8 35. Bxd5 Nxd5 36. Ne4 Nb4 37. Rc7+ 37. Nd6+ prevents Rd5 and weakens the pawn at d4. 37... Kg6 38. Ke2 Rd5! 39. axb5 Rxb5 40. Rc4 a5 41. Rc5 Rxc5 42. Nxc5 Kf5 43. Nd3 Nxd3 44. Kxd3 Rb8! 45. Rxa5 45. Ra2 Rb4 45... Rxb2 46. Kxd4 >= 46. g3 46... Rxg2-+ 47. Ra8 Rd2+ 48. Ke3 Rxh2 49. Ra5 h5 50. Rb5 h4 51. Ra5 Rb2 52. Rc5 h3 53. Rc8 h2 54. Rh8 Kxe5 55. Rh7 Kf5 56. Rh6 e5 57. Rh8 Rb3+ 58. Kf2 Rb1 59. Rxh2 Rb2+ 60. Kg3 Rxh2 61. Kxh2 Kf4 0-1


Bjorn Thorsteinsson - Moshe Czerniak [C06]

Varna ol (Men)/Varna (1) 1962


1. e4 e6 2. d4 d5 3. Nd2 Nf6 4. e5 Nfd7 5. Bd3 c5 6. c3 Nc6 7. Ne2 cxd4 8. cxd4 f6 9. exf6 Qxf6 10. Nf3 Bb4+ 11. Bd2 Bxd2+ 11... Bd6 12. Qxd2 O-O 13. O-O e5 The old fashioned method of freeing the Bishop at c8. 14. dxe5 Ndxe5 15. Nxe5 Nxe5 16. Bc2 Be6 17. Nd4+/= Bf7 18. b3 Rac8 19. Rad1 Rc5 20. Bb1 Rfc8 21. Rfe1 21. Bf5 21... Bh5 22. f3 Rc3 23. Qe2 23. Bf5! R8c7 24. Qf4! Ng6?! 25. Bxg6 Qxf4 26. Re8+ Qf8 27. Rxf8+ Kxf8 28. Bxh5 23... Re8 24. Qf2 a6 25. Qd2 Rc7 26. f4 Nc6 27. Rxe8+ Bxe8 28. Nf3 Rd7 29. Re1 Bf7 30. Ng5 h6 31. Nxf7 Kxf7 32. Qe2 Re7 33. Qh5+ Kf8 34. Rd1 d4 35. Bd3 Nb4 36. Rc1? Qe6 37. Qf3 Nxa2-+ 38. Bc4 Qe3+ 39. Qxe3 Rxe3 40. Rd1 b5 41. Bd5 Nc3 42. Rxd4 Nxd5 43. Rxd5 Rxb3 0-1


Shaun M Taulbut (2405) - John W Donaldson (2275) [C06]

Lone Pine op/Lone Pine (2) 1978


1. e4 e6 2. d4 d5 3. Nd2 Nf6 4. e5 Nfd7 5. Bd3 c5 6. c3 Nc6 7. Ne2 cxd4 8. cxd4 f6 9. exf6 Qxf6 10. Nf3 Bb4+ 11. Bd2 Bxd2+ 12. Qxd2 O-O 13. O-O e5 14. dxe5 Ndxe5 15. Nxe5 Qxe5! 15... Nxe5 16. Nd4 16. Rae1 Bg4 16... Qf6 17. Ng3 17. Bb5!? 17... Qf6 18. h3 Be6= 19. Nh5 Qf7 20. f4 Bxh3 21. Ng3 Bd7 22. Bc2 Rad8 23. f5 Qf6 24. Rf4 Rfe8 1/2-1/2 [ChessBase]


Milan Matulovic - Viktor Kortschnoj [C06]

JUG-URS/Ohrid (3.2) 1972


1. e4 e6 2. d4 d5 3. Nd2 Nf6 4. Bd3 c5 5. e5 Nfd7 6. c3 Nc6 7. Ne2 cxd4 8. cxd4 f6 9. exf6 Qxf6 10. Nf3 e5 11. dxe5 Ndxe5 12. Nxe5 Bb4+ 13. Bd2 Bxd2+ 14. Qxd2 Qxe5 15. O-O O-O The position is quite double edged, since the pawn at d5 could be a weakness or a strong passer. But at least Black's pieces are free. 16. Bb5 Bg4 17. f3 Be6 18. Rfe1 Qd6 19. Rac1 Rf6 20. Bxc6 bxc6 21. Qe3 Bd7 22. Qc5 Qxc5+ 23. Rxc5 Re8 24. Kf2 Rfe6 25. Rcc1 Kf7 26. Nf4 Rxe1 27. Rxe1 Rxe1 28. Kxe1 Bf5 A rather classic Knight vs. Bishop encounter. But here the Bishop is useful in support of the passed pawn. 29. h4?! 29. b4!~~ 29... a5 30. Kd2 d4 31. a3 c5 32. g4 Bg6 33. h5 Bb1 34. g5 h6 35. gxh6 gxh6 36. Ne2 a4 37. Ng3 Ke6 38. f4 Kd5 39. Ke1 Bd3 40. Kd2 Bb1 41. Kc1 Bd3 42. Kd2 c4 43. Kc1 c3 44. Nh1 Kc4 45. Ng3 Kb3 46. bxc3 dxc3 47. f5 Kxa3-+ 48. f6 Bc4 49. Nf5 Kb4 50. Nd4 a3 51. Kb1 Bf7 52. Nc6+ Kc5 53. Ne5 a2+ 54. Ka1 c2 55. Nd3+ Kd4 56. Nc1 Ke5 0-1


Zvonko Stanojoski (2475) - Sergey Volkov (2605) [C05]

Elista ol (Men)/Elista (4) 1998


1. e4 e6 2. d4 d5 3. Nd2 Nf6 4. e5 Nfd7 5. f4 c5 6. c3 Nc6 7. Ndf3 Qb6 8. a3 cxd4 9. cxd4 Na5 10. b4 Nc4 11. Bd3 a5 12. Qa4 Qc6 13. Qxc6 bxc6 14. Bxc4 dxc4 15. bxa5 c5 16. Ne2 Bb7 17. Bd2 Be7 18. Kf2 O-O 19. Kg3 Rfc8 20. Rhc1 Be4 21. dxc5 Bd3 22. Ned4 Nxc5 23. Bb4 Ne4+ 24. Kh3 Bc5 25. Ra2 h6 26. g4 Rc7 27. f5 exf5 28. gxf5 Ng5+ 29. Kg4 Rd8 30. Nb5 Rb7 31. Nd6 Bxd6 32. exd6 Ne4 33. a6 Ra7 34. Ne5 Rxa6 35. Nxd3 cxd3 36. Rc4 Nxd6 37. Rd4 Nb7 38. Rxd8+ Nxd8 39. Rd2 Nc6 40. Kf4 Nxb4 41. axb4 Rb6 42. Rxd3 Rxb4+ 43. Kg3 Kf8 44. Rd7 Ke8 45. Ra7 Rd4 46. f6 g5 47. h3 Rf4 48. Ra6 Kd7 49. Rb6 Rd4 50. Ra6 Rd6 51. Ra8 Rd3+ 52. Kg2 Rd4 53. Ra6 Rd6 54. Ra8 Rxf6 55. h4 Rf4 56. Ra7+ Ke8 57. hxg5 hxg5 58. Ra5 f6 59. Ra7 Re4 60. Kf3 Re7 0-1


Boris Grachev (2235) - Teimour Radjabov (2325) [C05]

Wch U12/Oropesa del Mar (6) 1998


1. e4 e6 2. d4 d5 3. Nd2 Nf6 4. e5 Nfd7 5. f4 c5 6. c3 Nc6 7. Ndf3 Qb6 8. h4 Though a standard move in this position, it seems quite wrong since it allows Black often to close up play on the kingside. 8... f6 9. Bd3 cxd4 10. cxd4 Bb4+ 11. Ke2!? The king is forced to move to save a pawn, but this seems the less desirable square. 11. Kf1 11... O-O Actually a relatively safe place for the king -- especially since White's is likely to be more exposed. 12. Be3 Be7 13. Qc2 f5 14. a3 h5!? Closing up the kingside. 15. Nh3 Qd8 16. Nhg5 Nb6 17. Nd2 Bd7 Finally, the Bishop emerges. 18. Rhc1 Rc8 19. Qd1 a5 20. Kf2 g6 21. b3 Rc7 22. Nb1 a4 23. b4 Qc8 24. Ra2 Na7 25. Rac2 Rxc2+ 26. Rxc2 Qb8 27. Qe2 Rc8 28. g3 Rc7 29. Nf3 Rxc2 30. Qxc2 Bb5 The critical square. 31. Ne1 Bc6!? 32. Nc3 Qe8 33. Qe2 Bd7 34. Nc2 Qc8 35. Bd2 Na8 36. Ke1 Nc7 37. Kd1 Qe8 38. Kc1 Ncb5 39. Kb2 Nxc3 40. Bxc3 Bb5 41. Ne1 Qc6 42. Nf3 Bd8 43. Nd2 Bb6 44. Qf1 Kf7 45. Qe2 Ke7 46. Qf1 Bxd3 47. Qxd3 Nb5 48. Qe3 Qxc3+ 49. Qxc3 Bxd4-+ 50. Qxd4 Nxd4 51. Kc3 Ne2+ 52. Kd3 Nxg3 53. Ke3 Ne4 54. Nxe4 dxe4 55. Kd4 Kd7 0-1

Game(s) in PGN