The Max Lange Attack has largely fallen out of fashion in contemporary master practice, but that is because people generally think you have to play like the old swindler Frank James Marshall if you want to make it work. But there is an alternative way of playing the old Lange that was first tried by Hans Fahrni in the early 1900's and later analyzed extensively by I. A. Horowitz in Chess Review. I call it "The Modern Horowitz Variation of the Max Lange Attack," and it is worth playing over. I have also posted a PGN file for those who would like to do some of their own analysis here. I have taken it only as far as time and skill have allowed!

Hans Fahrni - Saviely Tartakower [C55]

Baden-Baden it/Baden-Baden, GER (11) 1914


1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. d4 exd4 4. Bc4 Nf6 5. O-O Bc5 6. e5 d5

 

Black's two typical Knight-move alternatives are not as good once White is already castled:

 

a) 6... Ng4!? 7. Bf4!

White's two alternatives to this logical move are less solid, though the second is recommended by Horowitz:

(a) 7. h3? Ngxe5 8. Nxe5 Nxe5 9. Re1 d6 10. f4 d3+ 11. Kh2 Qh4 Steinitz)

(b) 7. c3!? Horowitz 7... d5 (not 7... dxc3?! 8. Bxf7+ Kxf7 9. Qd5+ Kf8 10. Qxc5+ Qe7 (or 10... d6 11. exd6 Qxd6 12. Qxc3) 11. Qxe7+! (11. Qxc3!?) 11... Kxe7 12. Nxc3) (nor 7... Ngxe5!? 8. Nxe5 Nxe5 9. Re1 when Horowitz suggests that this simply wins a piece -- but Fritz shows it's not that simple, though it is still advantageous for White after 9... Qe7 10. b4! (10. cxd4?! Bxd4! unclear) (10. f4 dxc3+ 11. Kh1 cxb2 12. Bxb2 Nxc4 13. Rxe7+ Bxe7 unclear ) 10... Bb6 unclear (10... Bd6 11. f4) 11. Bf4 d6 12. cxd4 Bxd4 13. Qxd4 Nf3+ 14. gxf3 Qxe1+ 15. Kg2 O-O 16. Nd2 and White has a strong attack ) 8. Bb5 dxc3 9. h3! Horowitz (9. Nxc3!?) 9... cxb2 (not 9... Nh6 10. Nxc3 Nf5 11. Qxd5 Qxd5 12. Nxd5 ) 10. Bxb2 Nh6 (10... Nxf2!? 11. Rxf2 Bxf2+ 12. Kxf2 O-O 13. Bxc6 bxc6 14. Qc2 ) 11. Qc2 Be7 (11... Bb6 12. Ba3!? Nf5 (12... Rb8) 13. Bxc6+ bxc6 14. Qxc6+ Bd7 15. Qxd5 Ne7?! (15... Rb8!?) 16. Bxe7 Kxe7 17. Qe4 Be6 18. Nc3 Horowitz) 12. Nd4 O-O 13. Bxc6 bxc6 14. Nxc6 Qe8 15. Nxe7+ Qxe7 16. Ba3 c5 17. Bxc5 Qc7 18. Qc3 )

7... d6

(7... O-O 8. h3 Nh6 9. Bg5! Be7 10. Bxh6 gxh6 11. Bd5 Bernstein-Fine, Paris-NY Match 1949)

8. exd6 Bxd6

(8... cxd6 9. Re1+ Kf8 (9... Nge5 10. Bxe5 dxe5 11. Nxe5 ) 10. h3! Nge5 (10... Nf6 11. Nbd2 ) 11. Bxe5 Nxe5 12. Nxe5 dxe5 13. Rxe5 Qc7 14. Qe2 g6 15. Nd2)

9. Re1+ Kf8

(9... Ne7 10. Bxd6 Qxd6 11. Qe2)

(9... Be7 10. Bb5 O-O 11. Bxc6 bxc6 12. h3! (12. Nxd4 Bh4 13. g3 Bf6 14. c3 Qd5) 12... Nf6 13. Nxd4 )

10. Bxd6+ Qxd6 11. c3! dxc3

(11... Bf5 12. cxd4 Rd8 13. Bb5 g6 14. Bxc6 Qxc6 15. Nc3 Rossolimo-O'Kelley, Trencianske-Teplice 1949)

(11... Qc5 12. Nxd4! Nxd4 (12... Qxc4? 13. Nxc6 with attack ) 13. Qxd4 Qxd4 14. cxd4 Bd7 15. Nc3 )

 

12. Nxc3 with compensation for White.

 

b) 6... Ne4? loses after 7. Re1 (also good is 7. Bd5 f5 8. exf6 Nxf6 9. Bg5 Be7 10. Bxf6! Bxf6 (10... gxf6 11. Ng5! h5 12. Nf7) 11. Re1+ Ne7 (better may be 11... Kf8) 12. Ne5 Bxe5 13. Qh5+ g6 14. Qxe5 Rf8 15. Nd2 c6 16. Ne4!? (16. Nc4! forces mate) 16... d6?! (16... Qa5[forced]) 17. Nxd6+ Kd7 18. Be6+ Kc7 19. Nxc8+ as in Morphy-Dominguez, Havana 1864) 7... d5 (7... f5? 8. exf6 d5 9. fxg7 Rg8 10. Rxe4+) 8. exd6 f5 9. Nbd2 with a strong attack for White.

 

7. exf6

White can also transpose to the Two Knights Modern with 7. Bb5 Ne4 8. Nxd4 O-O! etc., though this specific move order is about equal.

 

7... dxc4 8. fxg7!

8. Re1+ Be6 9. Ng5 Qd5 10. Nc3 Qf5 11. Nce4 O-O-O is the classical main line of the Max Lange, which has been analyzed as giving Black the better chances in a likely draw. John Emms, in Play the Open Games as Black, does a good job of summing up Black's best lines here.

 

8... Rg8[forced] 9. Bg5!

Fahrni may have originated this approach, which only appears in previous recorded games that transpose to standard lines. Horowitz's analysis, though, makes it a fully viable weapon.

 

9... Be7

Horowitz analyzed the critical line 9... f6!? 10. Bh6 (see diagram):

 


Critical position after 9...f6 10.Bh6

 

Of this position, Horowitz writes: "A resume of the position here discloses various pluses and minuses for White and Black: White's king is secure, an important point; 2) the White Pawn at g7 is a belligerent threat: it must hurdle only one rank to reach the eighth; 3) Black's "King is insecrure; 4) Black dominates the greater portion of the center. Because Black commands the center and, too, because White's pawn at g7 is tenuous, White must exploit and capitlize his advantages before Black achieves security. Given sufficient time Black will drive the White Bishop from h6, pick off the g-pawn, and rake white on the open g-file. Black must therefore strive to develop his light-squared Bishop and Queen, clear his first rank for Queenside castling, check advances toward his king, and, finally, institute a counter-attack."

(White gets no clear edge from first 10. Re1+ Kf7 11. Bh6

(Horowitz mentions the drawing line that goes 11. Ne5+ Nxe5 12. Rxe5 Bd6

(12... fxg5?! 13. Rxc5! (13. Qh5+!? Kxg7 14. Rxg5+ Kh8 15. Rxg8+ Schlechter 15... Qxg8! 16. Qxc5 Qg7 17. c3! Goeller(17. Qxc4 Bh3~/= Tamburro) 17... d3 (17... Bh3 18. Qxd4+/= is the point) (17... dxc3 18. Nxc3 Bh3 19. g3+/=) 18. Nd2 (18. Qxc4 Bh3) 18... Be6 19. Re1) 13... Qe7 14. Qh5+ Kxg7 15. Rxg5+ Kh8 16. Rxg8+ Kxg8=)

(12... Be7 13. Qh5+ Kxg7 14. Qh6+ Kf7 15. Qxh7+ Rg7 16. Qh5+= MCO)

13. Qh5+ Kxg7 14. Qh6+ Kf7 15. Qxh7+ Rg7 16. Qh5+ Rg6=)

11... Kg6! (11... Qd5?! 12. Nc3 Qf5 13. Ne4 Bb6 14. Qe2 Qd5? 15. Nfg5+!+- Tamburro) 12. Qc1 which is unclear at best. )

10... Bg4

 

(The chief alternative that Horowitz considers is 10... Qd5 threatening Qh5 and preparing O-O-O, when 11. Re1+ (11. Nc3!?) 11... Ne7

 

Alternatives are numerous and complicated:

(a) 11... Kf7 12. Nc3! Qf5 (12... Qh5?? 13. Ne5+) 13. Ne4! Bb6 (13... Bb4 14. c3!) 14. Qe2 d3! (14... Qd5? 15. Nfg5+! Kg6 16. Nxf6 Kxf6 17. Qh5 +-) 15. cxd3 Qg6 16. Nfg5+! fxg5 17. Qf3+ Qf5 18. Qh5+ Qg6 19. Nxg5+ with attack )

 

(b) 11... Be7 12. Nxd4! Nxd4 (12... Bh3!? 13. Qf3! ) (12... Qxd4? 13. Qh5+ Kd8 14. Rd1 +-) 13. Nc3 Horowitz)

 

(c) 11... Be6 12. Nc3 Qd7 (12... Qf5 13. Nh4 +-) 13. Ne4! (13. Qe2!? dxc3 14. Qxc4 O-O-O 15. Qxc5 cxb2 16. Rab1 unclear ) 13... Be7[] 14. Nxd4!! Nxd4 15. c3!? (15. Qh5+!? Kd8 16. Nc5! Bxc5 17. Qxc5 ) 15... O-O-O! 16. cxd4 (16. Qxd4) 16... Qxd4 17. Qxd4 Rxd4 18. Ng3! Kd7 (18... Rd6 19. Nf5 Bxf5 20. Rxe7 Bg6 21. Rae1 ) 19. Re2! ( Not Horowitz's original idea of 19. Rxe6? Kxe6 20. Re1+ Kf7 21. Rxe7+ Kxe7 22. Nf5+ when Horowitz mistakenly thought White was better here -- but he needed to look two moves further to see that the Knight is lost due to the back rank threat: 22... Kf7 23. Nxd4 Rd8 -+) 19... Rd6 20. Rae1 Ra6 21. h4 (21. h3 Bb4 22. Bd2) )

 

12. Nxd4!! Bxd4

(12... Qxd4?? 13. Qh5+ Kd8 14. Rd1 +-)

 

13. Nc3 Qc5 14. Ne4 Qe5 15. c3 Bb6 16. Ng3!

(a) 16. Qf3!? Horowitz 16... Qf5!

(16... f5 17. Qh5+ +- Kd7 18. Ng3 Qc5 19. Be3 Qb5)

(16... Bf5 17. Ng3)

17. Nxf6+ Kf7 18. Nxg8 Nxg8 )

 

(b) 16. Nd6+!? cxd6 17. Rxe5 dxe5 )

 

16... Qc5

(16... Qb5 17. a4 Qc5 18. b4 cxb3 19. Qxb3 Kd8)

 

17. b4!! Qxf2+

(17... cxb3 18. Qxb3+-)

 

18. Kh1 Bf5 19. Re2 Bg4 20. Rxe7+ Kxe7 21. Qxg4+-)

11. h3 Bh5

(11... Be6!? 12. Re1 Qe7 (12... Qd7? 13. Qe2 Kf7 14. Ng5+! fxg5 15. Qh5+ Ke7 16. Bxg5+ Kd6 17. Bf4+ Ke7 18. Qxc5+ Kf7 19. Qh5+ Ke7 20. Qxh7+-) 13. Qe2! Kd7 (13... Bf7!? 14. Nbd2 O-O-O 15. Qxe7 Bxe7 16. c3!? d3 17. Nh4 ) 14. Nbd2! (14. c3 d3) (14. Qe4 f5 15. Qf4) 14... Rae8 (14... Bd5 15. Ne4!? Bd6 16. Rad1 Rae8 17. Nfd2 f5 18. Nxd6 Qxd6 19. Qh5) 15. Nxc4 Kc8 16. Ncd2 Qf7 17. Qd3 Qh5 18. Qxh7 )

 

12. Qe2+

(12. Re1+ Be7 13. g4 Bf7 14. c3)

 

12... Qe7!

(12... Ne5 13. g4! d3 14. Qe1! (14. cxd3 cxd3 15. Qe1 Bg6 16. Nxe5 fxe5 17. Qxe5+ ) )

 

13. Qxc4 O-O-O 14. Nbd2

(14. Re1 Ne5 15. Nxe5 fxe5 16. Nd2 Bb4)

 

14... Bf7 15. Qd3 Bg6=

 

There are two additional lines besides Horowitz's critical 9...f6, which are 9...Qd5?! and 9...Ne7?! :

 

9... Qd5?! 10. Nc3 Qf5 11. Ne4! Be7

(11... Rxg7? 12. Nh4! Qxe4 (12... Qe5? 13. Re1 Kf8 14. f4+- (14. Bh6+-) ) 13. Re1 Qxe1+ 14. Qxe1+ Be6 15. Bf6 ) 12. Bxe7 (12. Re1!?) 12... Kxe7 13. Nxd4 Nxd4 14. Qxd4 Be6 15. Rfe1+-

 

9... Ne7 10. Nbd2 Bf5 11. Re1 Qd7 12. Nxc4 Rxg7 (12... O-O-O 13. Qd2 Rxg7 14. b4 Bh3!? 15. Nce5 Qf5 16. bxc5 f6 17. c6 fxe5 (17... Nxc6 18. Nxc6 Qg4 19. Nxa7+ Kb8 20. Nc6+! bxc6 (20... Kc8 21. Nh4) ) 18. cxb7+ Kb8 19. Rxe5 )

 

10. Bxe7 Kxe7

 


Position after 10...Kxe7

 

 

I.A. Horowitz writes: "A quick appraisal indicates various pluses and minuses for both sides. White's pawn at [g7], for example, is doomed. On the other hand, Black's King and his Kingside Pawn structure are targets. The problem here is to determine how each side can best pursue its advantage while in turn restraining the other side" (CR 1958, p. 194).

Capturing with the Queen instead is not good: 10... Qxe7?! 11. Nxd4 when Black's pawns give White targets for attack, for example: 11... Nxd4 12. Qxd4 Be6 13. Nc3 (13. f4!? c5) 13... c5 14. Qe5 O-O-O?! (14... f6 15. Qh5+ Qf7 16. Qxc5 Qxg7 17. g3 ) 15. Nb5! a6 (15... b6 16. Rfd1 f6 17. Qe4 Kb8) 16. Na7+ Kd7 17. Rad1+ Ke8 18. Rxd8+ Qxd8 19. c3! (19. f4!? Qd4+ 20. Qxd4 cxd4 21. f5 Bd5 22. f6! Kd7 23. Re1 Kc7 24. Kf2 Kb6 25. Re5 Be6 (25... Kc5 26. Rh5) 26. Rxe6+) 19... Ke7 20. Re1! Qb6 21. Nc8+ (21. f4) 21... Rxc8 22. Qg5+ Kd7 23. g8=Q +-

 

11. Re1+!

Horowitz continues: "Because Black's Bishop is often well posted at [g4] it seems best to tie it down to [e6] immediately." Two alternatives are playable but not as good:

a) 11. Qe2+ Be6 12. Nbd2 Qd5 13. b3!? unclear

b) 11. Nbd2?! Rxg7 12. Nxc4 Be6 13. Re1 Kf8= Fotys-Stulik 1940

 

11... Be6 12. Re4!

The first game with this line went instead 12. Nbd2!? Qd5 (12... Rxg7! 13. Nxc4 Kf8 Zagorovsky) 13. b3 cxb3 14. Nxb3 Rad8 15. Qe2 d3 16. cxd3 (16. Qe3!? Rxg7 (16... dxc2?! 17. Qc3!) 17. Rad1 Nb4 18. Na1 is unclear) 16... Rxg7 17. d4?! Kf8 18. Rac1 Rg6 19. Rc3 a5 20. Qd2 a4 21. Nc5 Nxd4 22. Nxe6+ Rxe6 23. Nxd4 Qxd4 24. Qc1 Rxe1+ 25. Qxe1 Qxc3 0-1, Mieses-Tiechmann, St. Petersburg 1909

 

12... f5

The most important alternative is 12... d3!? when Horowitz recommended 13. Ng5!? noting: "Out of a welter of possibilities, this move appears to lead to a positional edge. The plan is to eliminate Black's Bishop and saddle Black with a couple of isolated Pawns" (CR 1958, p. 194). There are two alternatives worth examining, the second of which may actually be better than Horowitz's line:

(a) 13. Nc3!? Rxg7 14. Re3! (better than 14. cxd3?! Qxd3! (14... cxd3?! 15. Qb3 b6 16. Nd5+ Kf8 17. Rxe6 fxe6 18. Nf4->) 15. Nd5+ Kf8! 16. Qxd3 cxd3 17. Nxc7 Bh3!=/+ as given by Horowitz, following an article in Debut magazine as quoted by MCO -- and given by other sources also (such as Zagorovsky)) 14... Nb4! (14... dxc2 15. Qxc2 Qg8 16. g3~/=) 15. cxd3 (15. Ne1?! dxc2!) 15... Nxd3 16. Ne1 Nxe1 17. Qxe1 Kf8 18. Ne4~/= (Goeller) gives White compensation but no clear path to advantage.)

 

(b) Horowitz wrote: "Another way with apparently promising prospects is"

 

13. Nbd2! which I think is relatively best, when the main line is: 13... Qd5

(Or 13... Rxg7 14. Nxc4 Kf8 15. Ne3! )

 

14. Rf4! (Goeller)

(Better than Horowitz's line 14. Rxc4?! Rxg7 15. Rc3?! of which he wrote: "[White thus] appears to contain Black's assault, leaving him with chronic defects in his Pawn structure." But Fritz points out 15... Rxg2+!! 16. Kxg2 Rg8+ 17. Kh1 Bh3 18. Rxd3 Bg2+ 19. Kg1 Bxf3+ 20. Kf1 Qxd3+ (20... Rg1+ 21. Kxg1 Qg5+ 22. Kf1 Qg2+ 23. Ke1 Bxd1 24. Rxd1 Nb4 25. Rc3 Qxh2 may be even better) 21. cxd3 Bxd1 22. Rxd1 Rd8 when it is White whose pawns are weaker.)

 

14... Rxg7

(14... Rad8!? 15. Nxc4 Rxg7 16. cxd3 (16. Ne3 Qd6) 16... Qxd3 (16... Kf8?! 17. Qe1! Kg8 (17... Qxd3?? 18. Qxe6) 18. Rd1!? ) 17. Qe1 Qg6 (17... Nd4 18. Nxd4 Rxd4 19. Rxd4 Qxd4 20. b3 ) 18. Nh4 Qg5 19. Nf5+ and Black's exposed king continues to be a problem for him.)

 

15. Nxc4 Rag8 16. g3!

(16. Ne3?! Rxg2+!=)

 

16... Rd8

(Better may be 16... dxc2 17. Qxc2 Qc5! 18. Rc1 Rg4 19. Rxg4 Rxg4 20. b3 (Goeller) 20... Qh5 (20... b5?? 21. Ne3+-) 21. Ne3 Rg6 22. Nh4 Qxh4 23. Qxg6 )

 

17. cxd3 Kf8

(17... Qxd3?! 18. Qe1 )

 

18. Qb3 b5 19. Qa3+ Kg8 20. Ne3

(or 20. Na5!? b4 (20... Ne5 21. Nxe5 Qxe5 22. Re4! (22. Nc6?! Qxf4 23. Nxd8 Bd5 ) 22... Qd5 23. Rc1 ) 21. Qa4 Qxa5 (21... Nxa5? 22. Rd4!) 22. Qxc6 )

 

20... Qxd3 21. Qxd3 Rxd3 22. Rc1 and White's pieces are better placed and can exploit Black's pawn weaknesses, e.g.: 22... Rd6 23. Nf5 Bxf5 24. Rxf5 a6 25. Rfc5 )

13... dxc2

(13... Rxg7 14. Nxe6 fxe6 15. Nc3 (15. Rxc4? Rxg2+! 16. Kxg2 Qd5+ ) 15... dxc2 16. Qxc2 transposes to our main line 16... Qd3 17. Qxd3 cxd3 18. Rd1 Rd8 19. Re3)

(13... Qd5 14. h4 Rxg7 15. Nc3 gaining a tempo on Black's Queen 15... Qf5 16. g4 Qg6 17. cxd3 (17. f4!?) (17. Nd5+ Kd7 18. cxd3 Rag8 19. dxc4 Kc8~/= is hard to judge, though I don't see anything immediate for Black after 20. Nf4 Qh6 21. Nfxe6 fxe6 22. Nxe6+/=) 17... Rd8 18. f4)

 

14. Qxc2 Qd3

"To swap Queens in order to avert any future assault on Black's King" writes Horowitz

 

15. Qxd3 cxd3 16. Nxe6 fxe6 17. Nc3

"White's plan is to maintain material equality and enjoy the sounder Pawn structure" notes Horowitz

 

17... Rad8 18. Rd1 Rxg7 19. Re3 and now, less clear than Horowitz had presumed is 19... Nb4! (19... d2!? 20. Ne4 notes Tamburro, following Horowitz, but the position looks about equal really, especially since Black's King may be better situated for the endgame. Black also seems to have a slight initiative as White's pieces clump together in the center of the board seeking to recover the pawn. For example: 20... Ne5! 21. Rxd2 (21. b3 Rd4!?=) 21... Nc4 22. Rxd8 Nxe3 23. Rc8 Kd7 24. Rb8 Nxg2 25. Rxb7 Nf4+ 26. Kf1 Rg2 unclear ) 20. g3! ( Horowitz mistakenly gives 20. a3? when Black remains up a pawn after 20... Nc2 21. Rexd3?! Rxd3 22. Rxd3 Rxg2+! 23. Kxg2 Ne1+ 24. Kf1 Nxd3 ) 20... c5! 21. a3 (21. b3 Rg5!? ) 21... Nd5 22. Nxd5+ (or 22. Rexd3 Nxc3 23. Rxd8 Nxd1 24. Rxd1) 22... Rxd5 23. Rexd3 Rxd3 24. Rxd3 Rg5 and, frankly, White's advantage, if any, would be hard to exploit. 25. f4 Rf5 (25... c4 26. Rb3!! cxb3 27. fxg5 ) 26. Kf2!? c4 (26... e5!? 27. Rd5! Kf6 28. Rd7! exf4 29. g4 Rg5 30. Kf3 ) 27. Rc3 b5 28. Ke3 e5 29. b3=

 

13. Rh4 Kf7 14. Rxh7 Rxg7 15. Rxg7+ Kxg7

"With an unclear position" is the conclusion of John Emms. But there seems little question that White has an edge. After all, from this moment on Fahrni is completely outplayed yet still has at least equal chances until very late into the game. Black's King is much more exposed and the further development of pieces and opening of lines will only serve to highlight that fact.

 

16. Nbd2?!

The first and most important improvement to recommend is Jude Acers's 16. Qd2! (of which he says he simply wishes to mobilize his forces strongly with Qf4 and Nbd2-f1-g3) 16... Qf6! ( Black simply aids White in putting his pieces on strong squares with 16... d3 17. cxd3 cxd3 (17... Qxd3 18. Qg5+ Kf7 19. Nc3 ) 18. Nc3 ) 17. Qf4 (17. c3!?) 17... Bd5 18. Nbd2! (18. Qxc7+ Kh8 19. Qg3 Re8 is less clear )

 

An alternate plan is to go after the c4-pawn with 16. Na3!? Qf6 (16... d3 17. cxd3 cxd3 18. Qd2 Qf6 19. Qxd3 Qxb2) (16... Qd5 17. Qd2! ) (16... c3!? 17. bxc3 dxc3 18. Qe1 Qf6 19. Nb5 ) 17. Qe2 (17. Nb5?! Rd8 18. Nxc7 Bf7 with counter-attack for Black ) 17... Re8 18. Nxc4 Bf7 19. Qf1 and it is hard to see what compensation Black has for the pawn. E.g.: 19... Nb4?! 20. a3!

 

16... Qf6 17. Qe2 c3 18. bxc3 dxc3 19. Nb3 Re8 20. Qb5 Bc8 21. Nbd4 a6 22. Qc5?!

And here better is 22. Qc4 Nxd4 23. Nxd4 Qe5 24. Nf3 and White picks up a pawn.

 

22... Nxd4 23. Nxd4 Qe5! 24. Qxc3

Not 24. Qxe5+?! Rxe5 25. Kf1 f4

 

24... Kf8 25. Qd2 c5 26. Nb3

White could have had a likely draw by 26. Qh6+ Kf7 27. Qh5+ (or 27. Qh7+) 27... Kf8 28. Qh6+ Qg7!? (Black must exchange Queens to avoid the perpetual) 29. Qxg7+ Kxg7 30. Nb3 b6 31. Rd1 f4!? (31... Re2 32. Nd2 a5 33. Kf1 Ba6 34. c4 ) 32. h4 and though Black has the better position, it's not clear that it fully compensates for White's extra pawn.

 

26... f4!

Black's excellent pieces and pawns on dark squares dominate the board. White must now try to exchange Queens and enter the ending to have chances of making the extra pawn count.

 

27. Rf1?!

This seems overly defensive. Better to try to exchange Queens and activate the Rook by >= 27. Rd1 Kg7 28. h3 f3!? 29. Qd6 , when the outcome is still uncertain.

 

27... b5 28. Qc1?!

White seems to be in total retreat, assuming a defensive posture that simply allows Black's initiative to turn into a winning advantage.

 

28... Kf7 29. Qd1 Bb7 30. Qd7+ Re7 31. Qh3 Kg8 32. Qh4 c4 33. Nc1

33. Na5 Be4

 

33... f3! 34. g3 Rd7 35. a3 Rd4 36. Qh6 Rd6 37. Qh4 Bc8 38. Na2 Kg7 39. Nc3??

Necessary was 39. c3 to rescue the Queen.

 

39... Rd4!-+

White must now sacrifice to save his trapped Queen.

 

40. Ne4 Rxe4 41. Qd8 Re1!

This unfortunate first outing for the Modern Max Lange probably discouraged many from taking a closer look at the line. 0-1

[Michael Goeller]


SUPPLEMENTAL GAMES


 

Louis Paulsen - George Mackenzie [C55]

London 1863


1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. Bc4 Nf6 4. d4 exd4 5. O-O Bc5 6. e5 d5 7. exf6 dxc4 8. fxg7 Rg8 9. Bg5 Qd6 10. Nbd2 Bf5 11. Re1+ Kd7 12. Nxc4 Qd5 13. Nce5+ 13. Ne3 Qe6 (13... Qe4 14. Ng4) 14. b4 Bb6 15. Ng4 Bxg4 16. Rxe6 fxe6 17. b5 13... Kc8 14. c4 Qd6 15. Nxc6 15. Nxf7 Qd7 16. Nh6 Rxg7 17. Nxf5 Rxg5 18. Nxg5 Qxf5 19. Re8+ Nd8 20. Ne6 15... Qxc6 16. Nxd4 Bxd4 16... Qg6 17. Re5! (17. Nxf5) 17... Bxd4 18. Qxd4 Be6 (18... Qxg5 19. Rae1+-) 19. Rd1 b6 20. Be7+- 17. Qxd4 b6 18. b4 Qg6 19. Bf4 Be6 20. Qe5 Kb7 21. Qxc7+ Ka6 22. b5+ Ka5 23. Bd2+ Ka4 24. Qd6 a5 25. bxa6 1-0 [Michael Goeller]


Janos Balogh - Laszlo Szabo [C55]

Hungary 1946


1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. d4 exd4 4. Bc4 Nf6 5. O-O Bc5 6. e5 d5 7. exf6 dxc4 8. fxg7 Rg8 9. Bg5 Be7 10. Bxe7 Kxe7 11. b4!? A very interesting move in the position! 11... cxb3 11... Nxb4?? 12. Qe1++- 12. Nbd2!? 12. Re1+! Kf6! (12... Be6 13. axb3 Rxg7 14. Ra4!+/=) 13. axb3 Kxg7 14. Nbd2 Bg4 15. h3 Bh5 16. Ra4 with compensation seems more promising. 12... Rxg7 Better 12... bxc2! 13. Qxc2 Rxg7 14. Rfe1+ Kf8 13. Nxb3 Bh3 14. Re1+ Kf8 15. g3 Qd5 16. Qe2 Rg4 17. c4 dxc3 18. Rad1 Qc4 19. Qe3 Rg6 20. Na5!? Nxa5?! 20... Qb5! 21. Ne5 Qxa2 22. Nxg6+ hxg6 23. Qh6+ Kg8 24. Rd4! c2 25. Rh4 Qb2[] 26. Rxh3 Qg7 27. Qd2 Nb3 28. Qxc2= Nd4 29. Qe4 Qf6 30. g4 Rb8 31. f4 c5 32. Ree3 Ne6 33. Rhf3 Qd4 34. h4 b5 35. f5 Qxe4 36. Rxe4 Nd4 37. Rc3 gxf5 38. gxf5 b4 39. Rxc5 b3 40. Rxd4 b2 41. Rd1 b1=Q 42. Rxb1 Rxb1+ 43. Kg2 Ra1 44. Kf3 Ra4 45. Kg3 Kg7 46. Rc6 a5 47. Ra6 Ra1 48. Kg4 a4 49. Kh5 1/2-1/2 [Michael Goeller]


A. Ker (2320) - N. Croad (2201) [C55]

109th ch-NZL/Christchurch NZL (4) 2001


1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. d4 exd4 4. Bc4 Nf6 5. O-O Bc5 6. e5 d5 7. exf6 dxc4 8. fxg7 Rg8 9. Re1+ Be7 10. Bg5 Be6 11. Bxe7 Kxe7 12. Re4 d3 13. Nc3 Rxg7 14. cxd3 Qxd3 15. Nd5+ Kd6 16. Nf4 Qxd1+ 17. Rxd1+ Kc5 18. Rxe6 1-0

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