Saturday, August 27, 2005

Demetrick-Goeller, KCC Summer Tourney 2005


Black to move after 10.Nb1?
There are two good options.

My game with Joe Demetrick (which you can view online or download as a PGN) from the Kenilworth Chess Club Summer Tournament this past Thursday was practically a mirror image of my game with Ed Selling from two weeks ago. Both Ed and Joe played the anti-Nimzovich 2.Nf3, both let me gain the edge out of the opening with a simple combination at move 10, and then both overlooked a chance to at least equalize when I screwed up later on. I think I have to work on maintaining concentration throughout the game. Too often in winning positions I lose attention and allow myself to get overwhelmed by the task of calculating at each step. Or sometimes, as in the present game, I simply get overwhelmed by the number of attractive options and spend too much time at each turn trying to choose among them, leaving myself too little time to think when the critical juncture comes. The PGN is pasted below and linked above.


Joe contemplates his move.

[Event "KCC Summer Tourney"]
[Site "Kenilworth, NJ USA"]
[Date "2005.08.25"]
[Round "?"]
[White "Demetrick, Joe"]
[Black "Goeller, Michael"]
[Result "0-1"]
[ECO "B00"]
[Annotator "Goeller,Michael"]
[PlyCount "62"]
[TimeControl "G60"]

1. e4 Nc6 2. Nf3 d6 3. d4 Nf6 4. Nc3 g6 { I have been looking at this transposition to a Pirc of late.} ({I usually play } 4... Bg4) 5. h3 Bg7 6. Bb5 a6 7. Bd3 {If White was going to retreat, why not play 6.Bd3 in the first place? Now Black's ...a6 gives him a useful tempo and chances for immediate counterplay.} ({ During the game I felt that White simply had to take at c6, when play might go } 7. Bxc6+ bxc6 8. O-O O-O 9. Re1 Rb8 10. e5 Nd7 $1 {followed by ...c5 =}) 7... O-O ({Emboldened by White's retreat, Black should probably attack in the center immediately by} 7... Nd7 $1 8. Be3 e5 9. d5 (9. dxe5 Ndxe5 $11) 9... Nd4 $1 10. Bxd4 $6 exd4 11. Ne2 c5 12. dxc6 bxc6 13. Nfxd4 c5 14. Nf3 Bxb2 $15) ({ or} 7... Nb4 $5 8. Be2 d5 9. e5 Ne4 10. O-O (10. Nxe4 $2 dxe4 11. Ng5 Qxd4 $1 $17) 10... f6 (10... c5 $5 11. dxc5 Nxc3 12. bxc3 Nc6 13. Bf4 Qa5 $5 14. Qxd5 Be6 $44) 11. a3 Nc6 $13) 8. Be3 e5 9. d5 ({I didn't much like the prospect of} 9. dxe5 dxe5 10. Bc5 Re8 11. Bc4 $11) 9... Ne7 10. Nb1 $2 {Joe said after the game that his idea was to follow with c4 to strengthen his center. But Black has immediate tactical shots after this retreat.} (10. O-O c6 $5 (10... Ne8 11. Re1 f5 $11)) 10... Nxe4 $1 ({The other idea is} 10... Nexd5 11. exd5 e4 {but this looks only about equal after} 12. Nc3 (12. Be2 exf3 13. Bxf3 Nd7 14. Nc3) 12... exd3 13. Qxd3 Bf5 14. Qd2 Re8 15. O-O-O { though Black is certainly doing very well.} (15. O-O c5 $1)) 11. Bxe4 f5 12. Bxf5 $6 (12. Nc3 fxe4 13. Nxe4 Nf5 $15 (13... Bf5 $15)) ({Relatively best was} 12. Bd3 e4 13. Nc3 exf3 (13... Bxc3+ $5) (13... exd3 $5) 14. Qxf3 b5 $36) 12... gxf5 {I liked having complete control of the center. But even stronger was to go after the two Bishops or the initiative by} (12... Nxf5 $1 13. Bg5 Qe8 14. Nc3 e4 $19) 13. Nc3 Qe8 {Black has almost too many good ideas here. I finally settled on the Queen move as a way of asking, "Where are you going to put your King?" I'm ready to attack in the center by f4 and e4-e3, the kingside by Qg6, or the queenside by b5-b4 and Qa4.} 14. Qe2 b5 {This gives Black complete control of the position and makes it very hard for White to hold the pawn at d5.} ({But Black should simply grab a pawn by} 14... e4 $1 15. Ng5 (15. Nd4 $2 f4 $19) 15... Bxc3+ 16. bxc3 Nxd5 $19) 15. a3 Bb7 (15... e4 $1 $19) 16. O-O-O ( 16. Rd1 $142) 16... f4 17. Bd2 Nxd5 18. Nxd5 Bxd5 19. Rhg1 $6 (19. Bxf4 $4 Bxf3 $19) 19... Bc4 ({The problem I find with such won positions is that I simply have too much choice. I had originally considered playing} 19... e4 20. Nh4 Bc4 21. Qe1 Qh5 $1 { with an atack, which Fritz shows to be winning quickly after} 22. g3 fxg3 23. fxg3 Be2 24. g4 Qe5 25. Bc3 Qf4+ 26. Bd2 e3 27. Qxe2 exd2+ 28. Qxd2 Qf6 $19) ({ I also looked at} 19... c6 {. I finally decided upon a queenside attack supported by d5-d4 and e5, but I did not anticipate Black's potential kingside counterplay.}) 20. Qe1 Qc6 21. Bc3 Rae8 22. Nh4 d5 23. g4 (23. b3 $6 d4 $40) 23... d4 ({I did not consider the best move} 23... fxg3 $1 24. fxg3 ({ I did not notice} 24. Rxg3 $4 Qh6+ $19) 24... d4 25. Bb4 Bh6+ 26. Kb1 Rf7) 24. Bb4 Rf7 25. Nf5 Be6 $2 {A potentially critical miscalculation.} (25... Bd5 $1 26. Nxg7 Rxg7 $17) 26. Nxg7 Rxg7 27. Qf1 $4 { Now Black's attack breaks through quickly.} ({White has the same misconception that the e-pawn is indirectly guarded. But White is actually a little better after} 27. Qxe5 $1 a5 $1 (27... Bb3 $2 28. Qc5 $1 $16) (27... Bxg4 $4 28. Qxd4 $18) 28. Bxa5 (28. Qc5 $14) 28... Bb3 29. Qf5 Re5 $1 30. Qd3 (30. Qc8+ Re8 31. Qf5 Re5 32. Qc8+ $11) 30... Bxc2 31. Qxc2 Rc5 32. Bc3 $14) 27... Qd5 28. b3 c5 29. Ba5 c4 30. Qg2 f3 31. bxc4 $2 bxc4 0-1

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