Edward Lasker - Frank James Marshall [C42]

Lake Hopatcong/Lake Hopatcong, NJ USA (2) 1926


This is a fascinating example of Marshall the technician rather than Marshall the tactician. The opening leads to a seemingly equal position, but Marshall is able to place his pieces better than his opponent, and he uses his better position to limit White's options to the point where it is difficult for him to avoid a mistake.

1. e4 Nf6 Andy Soltis writes that this move is "an indication of how far Marshall had come since being confronted with hypermodern openings two years before at the New York international." Marshall may have taken readily to the Alekhine's Defense in part because it allowed for transpositions to his favorite Petroff, as in the present game. 2. Nc3 "If White has nothing better than this against the so-called 'Alekhine Defense,' that defense is a good one" writes Howell. 2... e5 3. Nf3 Bb4 4. Nxe5 "It is a good chess principle not to delay one's development in the opening by capturing a Pawn unless the Pawn can be kept or the opponent made to suffer in development while he is regaining it" writes Howell. 4... O-O The inferior way for Black to recover the pawn is by 4... Qe7 5. Nd3 Bxc3 6. dxc3 Qxe4+ 7. Be2 (or simply 7. Qe2 O-O 8. Qxe4 Nxe4 9. Be3+/= and the two Bishops are a long-term plus for White.) 7... O-O 8. O-O d6 9. Bf3 Qh4 10. Nf4 Ng4 11. h3 Ne5 12. Be4 Nbc6 13. g3 Qd8 14. Qh5 Ng6 15. Nd5 f5 16. Bg5 Qd7 17. Bg2+/= 1-0 Gikas,B-Batyte,D/Budapest HUN 2004 (50) 5. Be2 White cannot hold the pawn successfully: a) 5. d3 d5 6. a3 (>= 6. Bd2 Qe7 7. Nf3 dxe4 8. Nxe4 Nxe4 9. dxe4 Qxe4+ 10. Be2 Re8 11. O-O Qxe2 12. Bxb4 Nc6 13. Qxe2 Rxe2 14. Rfe1 Rxe1+ 15. Rxe1 Bf5 (15... Bg4!?) 16. Bc3 Bxc2-/+ 1/2-1/2 Brochet,P-Mellado Trivino,J/Escaldes AND 1999 (24)) 6... Bxc3+ 7. bxc3 Re8 8. f4 dxe4 9. d4 Nd5 10. c4 Ne7 11. Be2? Nf5-> 12. c3 Qh4+ 13. Kf1 e3 (13... f6!) 14. Qe1 Qxf4+ 15. Kg1 Nxd4 16. cxd4 Qxd4 17. Rb1 Qxe5-+ 0-1 Lupi,F-Alekhine,A/Lisbon 1946 (22) b) 5. f3?! d5! (5... Bxc3!? 6. dxc3 Nxe4 7. Qd4=) 6. exd5 (6. Nxd5? Nxd5 7. exd5 Re8 8. f4 Rxe5+!) 6... Re8 7. f4 Nxd5 8. Nxd5 Qxd5~/= 5... Re8 6. Nd3 White returns the pawn for the two Bishops. The other retreat does not gain the two Bishops and is therefore rather equal: 6. Nf3 Nxe4 (as the main line is drawish, Black can consider 6... d5!? 7. exd5 Qe7~/=) (6... Bxc3!? 7. dxc3 Nxe4=) 7. Nxe4 Rxe4 8. c3 Bf8 9. d4 d5= 6... Bxc3 7. dxc3 Nxe4 8. O-O More common today is 8. Nf4 followed by c4 with the idea of securing d5, thus preventing Black's advance of the d-pawn and allowing White's Bishops more scope. Black must then develop more circumspectly with 8... d6 9. O-O Nd7! (9... Nc6 10. c4 Bf5 11. Re1 Nf6 12. b3 Ne5 13. Bb2 Ne4 14. Nd5 c6 15. Ne3 Bg6 16. f4!+/= Qh4 17. g3 Qh6 18. Qd4 ( better 18. Bxe5! dxe5 19. Ng4 Qh3 20. Bf1! Qh5 21. Rxe4!! (21. Nxe5+/=) 21... f5 22. Rxe5+/-) 18... c5?! (18... f5!~~) 19. Qd1 Nc6 20. Bf3! f6? 21. Ng4! Qh3 22. Bg2 Qh5 23. Rxe4! 1-0 Peters,J-Jones,S/Los Angeles USA 2000 (23)) 10. c4 Nf8 11. f3 Nc5 12. b3 Nfe6!? 13. Nh5 g6 14. Ng3 Qf6 15. Rb1 Qd4+ 16. Kh1 Qxd1 17. Bxd1 a5= 18. Kg1 b6 19. Re1 Bb7 20. a4 f6 21. Kf2 Kf7 22. Ne2 Ng7 23. Nd4 Rxe1 24. Kxe1 Re8+ 25. Kf2 Nge6 26. Nb5 Bc6 27. Be3 f5 28. Bd2 Re7 29. h4 Bxb5 30. axb5 Re8 31. Ra1 Re7 32. Kf1 Re8 33. c3 Nd3 34. b4 Ne5 35. Be2 axb4 36. cxb4 Nd4 37. Ra7 Re7? (37... Nxe2 38. Rxc7+ Re7 39. Rxe7+ Kxe7 40. Kxe2 Nxc4=/+) 38. Bg5! Rd7 39. c5! dxc5 40. bxc5 Ne6? (40... Nxe2! 41. Kxe2 bxc5 42. Bf4 Ke6 43. Bxe5 Kxe5 44. b6 Rd6! 45. bxc7 Rc6=) 41. f4!+- 1-0 Conquest,S-Piket,J/Ohrid MKD 2001 (41) 8... d5 9. Nf4 c6 10. Be3 Soltis writes: "With the two bishops, the d4 outpost, and the prospect of opening the center with 11.c4, White apears to be developing a promising middlegame. Marshall liquidates the situation effectively." White should get in 10. c4! d4 11. Bd3= 10... Nd6 Preventing 11.c4. 11. Bd3 11. Re1!? 11... Bf5 12. Qf3 12. Bxf5?! Nxf5=/+ 12... Be4! 13. Qh3 Qd7! A strong move, not least because it asserts Black's superiority in the ending. 14. Bc5 14. Qh5 Qf5! (14... Nf5?! Soltis 15. Rae1=) 15. Qxf5 Nxf5=/+ 14... Qxh3 15. Nxh3 Nc4!? Though Black hereby exchanges off White's best piece, this is a risky choice by Marshall, since the resulting Bishops of opposite color ending offers White some drawing prospects. Perhaps best is 15... Nf5 16. Rfe1 Nd7=/+ 16. Bxc4 On 16. b3 there might follow 16... Nd7! 17. Bd4 Na3 18. Rac1 Bxd3 (18... c5!?) 19. cxd3 Re2=/+ 16... dxc4 17. Rac1 Nd7 18. Bd4 h6 This is a useful move, creating a retreat square for the Bishop along the h7-b1 diagonal, making luft for the King, and controlling more dark squares. It also puts the question to White: what can you do that is useful? 19. Rfd1 White's alternatives include: a) 19. Nf4 g5 20. Nh5 Bg6 21. Nf6+ Nxf6 22. Bxf6 "with some drawing hopes due to the opposite colored Bishops" writes Howell. b) 19. f3 Bf5 20. g4 Bh7!=/+ 19... Bf5 20. Nf4 g5 21. Nh5 Bg4 22. Be3? This is White's critical error, turning a difficult game into a lost one. Black has a much more difficult time gaining an edge following instead 22. Ng7! Re7! (better than 22... Bxd1?! 23. Nxe8 Bxc2 (23... Rxe8 24. Rxd1=) 24. Nd6 (or 24. Nf6+ Nxf6 25. Bxf6 Bd3 26. Re1~/=) 24... Bd3 25. Re1 Kf8 26. Nxb7 Rb8 27. Nc5 Nxc5 28. Bxc5+ Kg7 29. Bxa7= and the Bishops of opposite color practically assure a draw with such reduced numbers of pawns.) 23. f3 f6 24. Re1 (24. fxg4 Kxg7 25. Re1 Ne5=/+) 24... Rxe1+ 25. Rxe1 Kxg7 26. fxg4 Kf7=/+ and Black has a difficult fight ahead to prove an edge. 22... Re7 Suddenly White must lose at least the exchange. Black might also defend the Knight by 22... Red8 23. Rxd7 Bxd7-/+ But not 22... Bxd1? 23. Rxd1 Rad8? (23... Rxe3!=) 24. Rxd7! Rxd7 25. Nf6++/- 23. Rxd7 Bxd7 24. h4 gxh4 25. Bxh6 Bf5 26. Rd1? "The same error in the same place," setting up the fork that follows, notes Howell. 26... Re6! Not immediately 26... Bg4?? 27. Nf6++/- 27. Bg5 27. Ng7 Bxc2! 27... Bg4 forking Rook and Knight a second time. And if 28.Nf6+ Rxf6! wins. White used 1 hour and 56 minutes while Black used 2 hours and 13 minutes. 0-1 [M. J. Goeller]


James West (2200) - Stoyko (2310) [C01]

Viking Quads/Mount Arlington, NJ USA (2) 2005


1. e4 e6 2. d4 d5 3. exd5 exd5 West is satisfied with a draw while Stoyko is not. 4. Nf3 4. c4 4... Bg4 5. Bd3 5. h3 Bh5 6. Qe2+! Qe7[] 7. Be3 Nc6 8. Nc3 O-O-O 9. g4 Bg6 10. O-O-O f6!?= (10... Nb4!?) 5... Nc6 6. c3 Bd6 7. O-O Nge7 8. Re1 Qd7 9. Nbd2 h6! 9... O-O-O 10. b4-> 9... Bf5 10. Nf1 10. b4 O-O! 11. b5 Nd8 12. Qb3 Ne6 13. Ba3 Rfd8!? Varying from their last game, which continued 13... Nf4 14. Bf1 Neg6 15. Bxd6 Qxd6 16. Re3 c5 17. Qa3 b6 18. Rae1 (18. c4 Qf6) 18... Rfd8 19. h3 Bxf3 20. Nxf3 Ne6 21. g3 c4!? 22. Qxd6 Rxd6 23. Ne5 Nxe5 24. Rxe5 a6!=/+ 25. bxa6 Rxa6 26. R1e2 Ra3 27. Rc2 f6 28. Re3 Kf7 29. Bg2 Nc7 30. Kf1 Re6 31. Rxe6 Kxe6 32. h4 b5-/+ (32... Nb5) 13... Bxf3!? 14. Nxf3 Nf4!?<=> (14... Rfd8 15. Ne5 (15. Bxd6 Qxd6 (15... cxd6!?) 16. Ne5=) ) 14. Ne5 Bxe5 15. Rxe5 Nc8! 16. Rae1 16. h3 Nf4! 17. Bf1 Be6 (17... Bf5) 16... Nf4[] 17. Bf1 Be6 18. Nf3 Ng6 19. R5e3 Nd6 20. Bd3 Nc4 20... Bf5 21. Rxe6 Nf4 22. Bxc4? 22. R6e3 Qg4 23. g3 (23. Bf1 Nh3+=) 23... Nxe3 24. Rxe3 Nxd3 25. Rxd3+/- 22... dxc4 23. Qxc4 Nxe6 24. Ne5 Qd5 25. Bb4 a6 26. a4 Qxc4 27. Nxc4 axb5 28. axb5 Nxd4! 29. Be7 29. cxd4 Rxd4 30. Rc1 Rxc4! (30... Ra4) 29... Re8 30. cxd4 Rxe7! 31. Ne3 Ra4 32. Rb1 Re4 33. Nf5 g6 34. f3 Re2 35. Nxh6+ Kg7 36. Ng4 Rxd4 37. Kf1 Rdd2 38. Rc1 Rc2 39. Rd1 Red2 40. Ra1 f5 41. Ne3 Rb2 42. Rc1 Rf2+ 43. Kg1 Rfe2 44. Rxc7+ Kh6 45. h4 Rxe3 46. Rxb7 Re1+ 47. Kh2 Ree2 48. Kg3 Rxg2+ 49. Kf4 Rb4+ 50. Ke5 Rgb2 0-1


Steve Stoyko (2310) - Sandy Hatama (2238) [A30]

Viking Quads/Mount Arlington, NJ USA (3) 2005


1. Nf3 c5 2. c4 b6 3. g3 Bb7 4. Bg2 Nf6 5. O-O e6 6. Nc3 Be7 7. Re1 d6 8. e4 Nbd7 9. d4 cxd4 10. Nxd4 Qb8 10... Qc7!? Steve has a lot of respect for the Hedgehog, having played it himself for several years. 11. f4 11. Nd5!? exd5 12. exd5 Ng8 13. Nf5 (13. Qa4 Qd8 14. Bf4 Kf8) 13... Kf8 14. Nxg7 Ne5 (14... Kxg7 15. Qg4+ Kf8 16. Qxd7 h5 17. Bf4) 11. g4 h6 12. f4 11... a6 12. e5 12. Nd5?! exd5 13. exd5 (13. Nf5 dxe4) 13... Ng8 14. Qe2 Kf8~~ 12... dxe5 13. fxe5 Ng8 14. Bxb7 14. Ne4 Ra7 15. Bf4 14... Qxb7 15. Qg4! Bc5! 15... Bf8 16. Nxe6!! (16. Ne4->) 16... fxe6 17. Qxe6+ Kd8 (17... Be7 18. Ne4) 18. Be3 (18. Nd5) 16. Be3 Nxe5? 16... >= Ne7! 17. Ne4 O-O 17. Qxg7 Bxd4 18. Bxd4 Nf3+ 19. Kf2 O-O-O 20. Nd5! 20. Qxh8?! Nxd4 21. Ne4 f5 22. Qxg8 fxe4 23. Qg4 Qf7+<=> 20... Nxd4 20... exd5 21. Qg4++- 21. Qxd4+/- Nh6 22. Nxb6+ Kb8 23. Qf4+ e5?? Necessary was 23... Qc7 24. Rad1 (24. c5) 24... Ng4+ 25. Qxg4 Qxb6+ 26. Kf1+/- though White is better. 24. Qxh6 Ka7 25. c5 1-0


Greg Tomkovich - Mike Goeller [E61]

Kenilworth CC Summer Tournament/Kenilworth, NJ USA 2005


1. d4 Nf6 2. Nf3 d6 3. c4 Bf5 4. Nc3 Nc6!? Despite its success in the present game, this move is not best. The more standard plan is 4... g6 when 5. Nh4 Bd7 6. e4 Bg7 7. Be2 e5 8. Nf3 O-O leads to familiar positions from the King's Indian Defense, but with Black having the extra move ...Bd7. E.g.: 9. O-O Nc6 10. d5 Ne7 11. Ne1 Ne8!?~~ 5. Qb3?! This move appears premature, as the sequel shows. Best must be 5. d5! Ne5 (5... Nb4?? 6. Qa4+) (5... Nb8!?) 6. Nxe5! (6. Nd4 Bd7=) 6... dxe5 7. f3+/= which would have discouraged me from playing this line again. 5... a5! Of course, Black can defend the b-pawn with 5... Qc8 5... b6 6. a3 6. Qxb7? Nb4!-/+ 6. d5!? Nb4 7. Nd4 Bd7 8. a3 Na6= followed by Nc5 and e5, and White dare not play 9. Qxb7?? Nc5-+ 6... a4!? A little too aggressive in retrospect. 6... Bd7= 7. Qxb7? A blunder that hands Black an edge. Better is 7. Nxa4 Na5 8. Qd1 Be6!? 9. d5 Bd7 10. Nc3 Nxc4 11. e4+/= Also playable is 7. Qd1!? Bd7 (7... e5 8. d5 Na5!? 9. Qxa4+ Bd7 10. Qc2 Nxc4 11. e4 Nb6 12. Be3+/=) 8. e4 (8. Nxa4?! Nxd4) 8... e5 9. d5 Ne7 10. Bg5 h6!?~~ 7... Na5 8. Qb4?? Forced is 8. Qb5+ Bd7 9. Qg5 h6! 10. Qh4 Nb3 11. Rb1 Rg8!-/+ 8... Nb3 This simply wins at least a piece. 9. Nh4? Nxa1-+ The threat of Nc2+ winning the Queen prevents White from grabbing the Bishop. The rest is simply ugly, but it is always difficult to resign at move 10. 10. Kd2 c5 11. Qb7 Nb3+ 12. Kd1 Na5 13. Qf3 Bg4 14. Qg3?! cxd4 15. Nb5 e5! Trapping the Knight and threatening to win the Queen by ...Ne4. 16. f3 Be6 17. e4 Nxc4 18. Qe1? Qb6 19. Qb4? d5-+ 0-1 [Michael Goeller]


Frank James Marshall - Jose Raul Capablanca [C21]

Lake Hopatcong/Lake Hopatcong, NJ USA (9) 1926


1. e4 e5 2. d4 exd4 3. c3 In 1910, Marshall played Capablanca a theme match with the Max Lange Attack, with all games commencing 3. Nf3 Nc6 4. Bc4 Bc5 5. O-O Nf6 6. e5 3... d5!? The best way to avoid the wilder complications that White's opening choice makes possible, and therefore typical of Capablanca's style. In their excellent book on the Danish Gambit titled "Danish Dynamite" (2003), Karsten Muller and Martin Voigt consider this the stem game of what they call "The Capablanca Defense"--though the line had been around for many years before Capablanca took it up. C.S. Howell, in his contemporary notes to the game, writes: "A safe way to avoid the Danish Gambit, which there is no particular reason to avoid. Black can safely play 3... dxc3 4. Bc4 cxb2 5. Bxb2 d5 (Schlechter's proposal) 6. Bxd5 Nf6 " and Howell offers the line 7. Nc3 Nbd7. But, according to Edward Winter, Marshall himself had noted that 7. Bxf7+ Kxf7 8. Qxd8 Bb4+ 9. Qd2 Bxd2+ 10. Nxd2 Re8 "would make things rather interesting" (American Chess Bulletin, November 1913) . Muller and Voigt suggest that this famous "equalizing" line against the Danish (which that great Danish proponent Marshall himself invented and not Schlechter) leads, at best, to positions with lots of play for both sides--as Marshall himself obviously felt. In any event, Howell's note attributing Marshall's idea to Schlechter may have been among the first to muddle the waters of history that Winter tries to clarify. 4. exd5 Qxd5 According to Howell, contemporary opening books preferred 4... Nf6!? when perhaps might follow 5. Bb5+ Bd7 6. Bc4 b5!?~~ 5. cxd4 Nc6 Marshall had great success from this position, including the following two games: a) 5... c5? 6. Nc3! Qxd4 7. Bb5+ Bd7 8. Qe2+ Be7 9. Nf3 Qg4 10. Nd5! Kd8 11. Bf4 Bxb5 12. Qxb5 Qe6+ 13. Be5! Qc6 14. Qxc6 bxc6 15. Nc7+- Marshall-Schroeder, New York 1915 b) 5... Nf6 6. Nf3 Nc6 7. Be2 Bf5!? 8. Nc3 Bb4 9. O-O Bxc3 10. bxc3 O-O 11. c4 Qd7 12. d5 Ne7 13. Bb2+/= Bg6 14. Ne5 Qd8 15. Bf3 Nf5 16. Qb3+/- Nh4 17. Rfe1 Re8 18. Rac1 Nxf3+ 19. Qxf3 Nd7 20. Nxg6 hxg6 21. h3 Qh4 22. d6 cxd6 23. Qxb7 Nc5 (23... Nb6!=) 24. Qd5 Qf4 25. Re3 Qf5 26. Rce1 Qd7? 27. Ba3! Ne6 28. c5!? (28. Bxd6+/-) 28... Qb5 29. Qxd6 Red8 30. Qe5 Nd4 31. Re4 f6 32. Qg3 g5 33. Qc3 Nf5 34. Rb4 Qd3? 35. Re8+ Kf7 36. Qxd3 Rxd3 37. Rxa8 Rxa3 38. Rb7+ Kg6 39. Raxa7 Rc3 40. g4 1-0 Marshall,F-Daly/Bath 1909 (40) 6. Nf3 Bb4+ This move order gives White the fewest options. The tactically sharp 6... Bg4 seems to play to Marshall's strengths after 7. Nc3!? (or 7. Be2 Nf6 (7... Bb4+ 8. Nc3 Bxf3 9. Bxf3 Qc4 transposes to the game) 8. h3 Bb4+ 9. Nc3 Bxf3 10. Bxf3 Qc4 11. Bxc6+ bxc6 12. Qe2+ Qxe2+ 13. Kxe2 O-O 14. Be3 Rfe8 15. Rac1 c5 16. dxc5 Bxc5 17. Nb5 Bxe3 18. fxe3 Rab8 19. Nxc7 Rxb2+ 20. Kf3 Re5 21. Nd5 Rf5+ 22. Kg3 Rg5+ 23. Kf4 h6 24. Rc8+ Kh7 25. Nxf6+ gxf6 26. g4 Rxa2 27. Rd1 Ra4+ 28. Rd4 Raa5 29. Rdd8 Rg7 30. h4 h5 31. Rh8+ 1-0 Marshall,F-Kupchik,A/Havana 1913 (31)) 7... Bxf3 (7... Qa5 8. Be2 Nf6 9. O-O O-O-O 10. Be3 Be7 11. a3+/=) 8. Nxd5 Bxd1 9. Nxc7+ Kd7 10. Nxa8 Bh5~~ to which Muller and Voigt devote four pages of analysis without reaching a definitive conclusion. A game of Marshall'scontinued 11. d5 Nd4 12. Bd3 Bb4+? (Muller and Voigt offer 12... Bg6 13. Bxg6 hxg6 14. Kd1! Nh6 15. Be3 Nhf5 16. Rf1! Nxe3+ 17. fxe3 Nf5 18. Rf3+/= and Black has a number of choices here.) 13. Bd2? ( Muller and Voigt give instead 13. Kf1!+/- Ne7 14. Be3 Ndf5 15. Bb5+ Kd6 16. Bf4+ Kxd5 17. Nc7++/-) 13... Bxd2+ 14. Kxd2 Ne7 15. Rac1 (15. Rhe1? Nxd5! 16. Re5 Nf6=/+) 15... Rxa8 16. Rc4 Nef5 17. Rxd4 Nxd4 18. Ke3 Ne2 19. Bb5+ Kd6 20. f3 Kxd5 21. Kxe2 Bg6 22. Rc1 a6 23. Ba4 b5 24. Bb3+ Kd6 25. Rd1+= 1/2-1/2, Marshall-Leonhardt, Ostende 1905 7. Nc3 Bg4 8. Be2 8. a3 Bxf3! 9. axb4 Qe6+ 10. Be2 Bxe2 11. Nxe2 Nf6 12. O-O O-O 13. b5 Nb4~~ Voigt-Chandler, Germany 2002 8... Bxf3 9. Bxf3 Qc4! 10. Be3?! Muller and Voigt call this move "very risky," which means it's just the thing that Marshall would go for. But Howell is probably right that "There seems no good reason why White should thus forego the castling privelege." Better is >= 10. Bxc6+ bxc6!? (10... Qxc6 11. O-O Ne7 12. Qb3+/=) 11. Qe2+ Qxe2+ 12. Kxe2 when, according to Muller and Voigt, "By castling long and playing Ne7, Rhe8, Nd5/Nf5 Black finds valuable spots for his pieces, so he can face the near future fearlessly. White searches for a slight advantage by marching to c4 with his king and fixing the center with Be3 and Rd1-d3. Afterwards, he can proceed with b4 and Na4. Yet, in the end it isn't much, we must admit." 12... Ne7 (12... Nf6?! 13. h3?! would transpose to Marshall-Kupchik above) 13. Be3 O-O-O 14. Kd3!? c5 15. Kc4 cxd4 16. Bxd4 Nc6= Also possible is 10. Qb3!?~~ 10... Bxc3+ If Black does not play actively, White has surprising chances of developing an initiative thanks in part to his two strong Bishops. a) 10... O-O-O 11. Qb3 (11. Bxc6?! Bxc3+! 12. bxc3 Qxc3+ 13. Kf1 Qxc6 14. Rc1 Qa6+-/+) 11... Qxb3 12. axb3 Nxd4!? 13. Bxd4 Rxd4 14. Rxa7~~ b) 10... Nge7 11. Rc1 (11. Be2 Bxc3+ 12. Kf1 Qb4 13. bxc3 Qxc3 14. Rb1!?~/=) 11... Rd8 (11... O-O 12. a3 Bxc3+ 13. Rxc3 Qb5 14. b4!?+/=) (11... Qxa2 12. O-O Qxb2 13. Nb5~/=) 12. a3 Bxc3+ 13. Rxc3 Qe6 14. O-O O-O 15. Re1 Qd6 16. Bg5 f6 17. Be3 Kh8 18. Qb3 Rfe8 19. Qxb7 Nxd4 20. Bxd4 Qxd4 21. Rce3 Qc5 22. b4 Qd6 23. Qxa7 Qd7 24. g3 Ng6 25. Rxe8+ Rxe8 26. Rxe8+ Qxe8 27. Qxc7 Ne5 28. Be4 g6 29. Kg2 Qe6 30. h4 Ng4 31. Qc6 1-0 Kovacs,L-Travnicek,P/Reggio Emilia 1971 (31) c) 10... Rd8 11. Be2 Bxc3+ 12. Kf1 Qb4 13. bxc3 Qxc3 14. Rc1 Qa3 15. d5 Nge7 16. Bc5 Qa5 17. Bf3 Ne5?! 18. Qe2 N5g6 19. h4 h5 20. Be4 Kd7 21. Qb2 Kc8 22. d6 Nc6 23. Rh3 Qa6+ 24. Bd3 Qa4 25. Bf5+ Kb8 26. Ra3 Qxh4 27. Bxa7+ Nxa7 28. dxc7+ Ka8 29. cxd8=Q+ Rxd8 30. Kg1 Kb8 31. Qb6 Nc6 32. Rb3 Qe7 33. Qxc6 1-0 Smolenskiy,Y-Berul/Ukraine 1979 (33) d) 10... Nf6 11. Qb3!? (11. Qe2! Qxe2+ 12. Kxe2 O-O-O 13. a3+/=) 11... Qxb3 12. axb3 a5 13. O-O O-O-O 14. Rfd1 h6 15. Na2 Nd5 16. Nxb4 Ndxb4 17. d5 Ne5 18. Rxa5 Nxf3+ 19. gxf3 b6 20. Ra4 c5 21. Ra7 g5 22. d6 Rh7 23. f4 Rd7 24. Ra8+ Kb7 25. Rf8 Nc2 26. fxg5 Nxe3 27. fxe3 hxg5 28. Rg8 f6 29. Rf8 Rh6 30. e4 Kc6 31. Rc8+ Kb7 32. Re8 Rh4 33. Re6 Kc6 34. Rd3 Rf4 35. Kg2 f5 36. e5 Rd4 37. Rf3 f4 38. Rg6 Rd5 39. Re6 Rd2+ 40. Rf2 Rd3 41. Rg6 Rd5 42. Re2 Rd3 43. Rf2 Rd5 44. Re6 Rf7 45. Re8 Kd7 46. Rb8 Rxe5 47. Rxb6 Rd5 48. h4 Rf6 49. hxg5 Rxg5+ 50. Kf3 Rg3+ Belamaric,G-Potocnik,P/Skofja Loka 1998 (50) 11. bxc3 Qxc3+ 12. Kf1 Marshall was never afraid to move his King to f1. The alternative is 12. Bd2 Qd3! (12... Qxd4?! 13. O-O Nge7 14. Bxc6+! bxc6 (14... Nxc6 15. Re1+ Kf8 16. Qb3~/=) 15. Re1 Rd8 16. Qe2 O-O 17. Bg5 f6 18. Rad1 Qc5 19. Qe6+ Kh8 20. Be3~/=) 13. Bxc6+ bxc6 14. Bb4!? Qxd1+ (14... Qc4 15. Bc5 Nf6 16. Rc1 Qe6+ 17. Kf1~/=) (14... Qe4+ 15. Kf1~/=) 15. Kxd1! O-O-O 16. Bc5~/= and White's compensation for the pawn does not promise more than a draw. 12... Qc4+ 12... Nge7 13. Rc1 Qa5 (13... Qb4!? 14. Qd3 O-O 15. Rb1 Qd6 16. Qe4?! (16. Rxb7=) 16... f5 17. Qf4 Rab8?! 18. Qxd6 cxd6 1/2-1/2 Pietrusiak,B-Lundberg,O/Sweden 1992 (42) 19. g3!~/=) 14. d5? (14. Qb3!~~) 14... O-O-O! 15. Rc5 Qa6+ 16. Qe2 Nb4-/+ 0-1 Sluka,R-Sosna,J/CZE 2001 (39) 13. Kg1 If White is content with a draw, then possible is 13. Be2 Qd5 (13... Qb4!? 14. Rb1 Qd6 15. Rxb7~~) 14. Bf3= Qb5+!? 15. Be2 Qf5 16. Rb1|^ 13... Nge7 14. Rc1 Qxa2 14... Qb4 15. Rb1 Qd6 16. Rxb7 O-O 17. g3 Nd5 0-1 Kappes,D-Bierwisch,B (41) 18. Kg2= Muller and Voigt 15. Ra1 15. d5? Ne5 (15... Rd8!?) 16. Be4 f5 17. Rc2 Qb3 18. d6 Rd8 19. Qh5+ g6 20. dxe7 gxh5 21. exd8=Q+ Kxd8 22. Rd2+ Kc8 23. Bxf5+ Kb8 24. Bc2 Qb5 25. h3 Rg8 26. Kh2 Nc4 27. Re2 Qe5+ 28. f4 Qg7 29. Bc1 Qg3+ 30. Kg1 h6 (30... a5 31. Bxh7 Rd8 32. Bc2 h4 33. Re4 Nd2 34. Re7 Qc3 35. Bxd2 Qxd2 0-1 Herzog,A-Flear,G/Graz 1984 (35)) 31. Bh7 Rd8 32. Bc2 h4 33. Re4 Nd2 34. Re7 Qc3 35. Bxd2 Qxd2 0-1 Herzog,A-Flear,G (35) 15... Qc4 16. Rc1 Qa2 17. Ra1 Qc4 18. Rc1 1/2-1/2 Several commentators note that Black does not have to accept the draw, though Capablanca's safe lead in the tournament hardly encouraged him to try for more. And, of course, Marshall would be satisfied with a draw. As he had famously said, "Against Capablanca, the most you can hope for is a draw." Howell notes: "Black has two passed pawns plus, so White is content, and Black can get is Queen away from the attack of the rook only by giving back material or allowing White a strong attack." However, whether to accept a draw or play for a win is at Black's option in the position. At least one game has continued forward from here: 18... Qb4! 19. Rb1 Qd6 20. Rxb7 O-O=/+ Muller and Voigt 21. g3 Nd5 22. Kg2 Rab8 23. Rxb8 Nxe3+ 24. fxe3 Rxb8 25. Qa1 g6 Fritz suggests 25... Rb3 26. Rc1! Ne7 27. Qxa7 Rb2+ 28. Kg1? >= 28. Kh1= 28... Qb4!=/+ 29. Rd1 Qc3 30. Qa8+ Kg7 31. Qe4 Nf5 32. Qd3 Qb4 33. Bd5 h5 34. e4 Nh6 35. Qf3 c6 36. Bxc6 Qc4 37. Bd7 Qc2 38. h3 Qh2+ 39. Kf1 f5 40. exf5 Qxh3+ 41. Ke1 gxf5 42. Rd2 Rb1+ 43. Rd1 Rxd1+ 44. Kxd1 h4 45. Bxf5 Nxf5 46. Qb7+ Kf6 47. Qb6+ Kg5 48. gxh4+ Kf4 49. Qf6 Qd3+ 50. Kc1 Ke4 51. Qe6+ Kf3 52. Qc6+ Ke3 53. Qc2 Qa3+ 54. Qb2 Qa5 55. Qb3+ Kf4 56. Qb8+ Kg4 57. Qc8 Kxh4 58. d5 Qa1+ 58... Qxd5-/+ saves time 59. Kc2 Qa4+ 60. Kb2 Qb4+ 61. Kc2 Qe4+ 62. Kb2 Ne3 63. Qh8+ Kg4 64. d6 Qb4+ 65. Kc1 Qxd6 This position must be proven in the Nalimov tablebase. 66. Qg7+ Kf3 67. Qc3 Ke4? 68. Qb4+!= Bryson-Flear, British Ch Edinburgh 1985 1/2-1/2 [Goeller]


Mark Kernighan (2216) - Michael Goeller (2020) [B00]

KCC Summer Tournament/New Brunswick, NJ 2005


1. d4 Nc6 2. Nf3 d6 3. e4 Nf6 4. Nc3 Bg4 5. Be2 e6 6. O-O Be7 7. Bf4N Nd7?! Moving the same piece twice. a) Steve Stoyko thought that Black can get easy equality by 7... Bxf3 8. Bxf3 e5 9. dxe5 (9. Be3 exd4 10. Bxd4 Nxd4 11. Qxd4 O-O 12. e5 dxe5 13. Qxe5 Bd6 14. Qb5 Rb8 15. Bxb7 c5 16. Qc6 Qc7 17. Qxc7 Bxc7 18. Bf3 Rxb2) 9... dxe5 (9... Nxe5 10. Be2) 10. Be3 Nd4= b) The only game I could find in general databases continued 7... O-O 8. d5 exd5 9. exd5 Bxf3 10. Bxf3 Ne5 11. Re1 Nfd7 12. Be4 Bg5 13. Bg3?! (13. Qh5! h6=) 13... f5!<=> 14. f4 Bxf4 15. Bxf4 fxe4 16. Bg3 Nf6?! (16... Rf5|^ with the super-strongpoint at e5 and prospects of initiative with Qe8-g6 and Raf8.) 17. Nxe4 Nxe4 18. Rxe4 Qf6 19. Qe2 Ng6 20. c3 Qf7 21. c4 Rae8 22. Re1 Rxe4 23. Qxe4 Ne5 24. Qe2 Qf5 25. Bxe5 dxe5 26. Rf1 Qg5 27. b3 Rxf1+ 28. Kxf1 Qf5+= 29. Ke1 Kf7 30. Qf2 g6 31. g4 Qf4 32. Qxf4+ exf4?! 33. g5! Ke7? 34. c5! b6?? 35. b4+- bxc5 36. bxc5 Kd7 1-0 O'Chee,K-Morris,M/Sydney 2005 (36) 8. Be3?! This seems a waste of time. Several people suggested the stronger 8. d5! exd5 (8... Nce5 9. Nxe5!+/-) 9. exd5 (9. Nxd5!?+/=) 9... Bxf3 10. Bxf3 Nce5 11. Be4+/= though Black can likely equalize with 11... O-O with play similar to the database game above.(11... Ng6 12. Be3 Bf6+/=) Mark says he considered 8. e5 but after 8... d5= Black has a good French. 8... Nb6 And now moving that Knight a third time.... In retrospect, I don't know what I was thinking. 8... O-O 9. d5! Bxf3 10. Bxf3 Nce5 11. Be2 Nb6 9. Nd2?! Still best is 9. d5!+/= 9... Bxe2 10. Qxe2 O-O Black needs to seize the opportunity to play 10... d5! 11. Rad1 11. f4?! d5 12. e5 Qd7 13. g4 f6=/+ 11. d5! exd5 12. Nxd5 Re8+/= 11... d5 12. Rfe1 Bb4!=/+ This gains an edge for Black. Possible was 12... dxe4 13. Ndxe4! (13. Ncxe4?! Nxd4!=/+ (during the game I also looked at 13... f5? 14. Nc5 f4 15. Nxe6 fxe3 16. Nxd8 exf2+ 17. Qxf2! Rxf2 18. Nxc6!+/-) ) 13... Nd5 and it is not immediately clear how White can gain an edge, despite Black's many knight moves: 14. Nxd5 Qxd5 15. Nc3 Qf5 16. d5 Nb4!= 13. Qh5!? 13. Qg4 Bxc3 14. bxc3 dxe4 15. Qxe4 (15. Nxe4 f5) 15... Qd5=/+ 13... Bxc3 14. bxc3 Na4?! a) Most interesting is 14... f5! 15. exf5 Rxf5! (15... exf5 16. Bf4 Qd7 17. Re3!) 16. Qe2 Qf6 17. c4 (17. Nf3) 17... dxc4 18. Nxc4 Nd5 b) 14... dxe4?! 15. Nxe4 Qd5 16. Qh4 Qxa2 17. Bh6 f6 18. Qg3 Rf7 19. Nc5 (19. Nxf6+ Kh8) c) 14... Qf6!? 15. Bg5 (15. Nb3 dxe4 16. Nc5) 15... Qg6 16. Qxg6 (16. Qh4) 16... hxg6= and Black has better long-term prospects. 15. e5!? Kernighan felt that if he did not do something desperate, he was eventually going to get squeezed on the queenside. Stoyko thought White should actually sacrifice the exchange by 15. c4!? Nc3 16. cxd5 Nxd1 17. Rxd1 exd5 18. exd5 Ne7 19. c4 a6=/+ (19... Qd7) 15... Nxc3 16. Bg5!? f6 I had completely dismissed White's attacking prospects and did not calculate accurately here. Fritz suggests 16... Qe8? but White actually gets dangerous attacking prospects with 17. Re3!! (17. Bf6!? Nxd4 18. Re3 Qc6 19. Bxg7 (19. Rh3 Nce2+ 20. Kh1 Qxc2) 19... Nce2+-+) 17... Nxd1 18. Rh3 h6 19. Bf6!! (19. Bxh6? f6!-+) 19... Ne7[] 20. Bxg7 f6 21. Qxh6 Qg6 22. Bxf8 Qxh6 23. Bxh6+/- 17. exf6 gxf6? Now White's attack is completely justified. But I was still underestimating it. Black has at least two stronger plans that likely win: a) 17... Qe8!! 18. Qg4 Nxd1-/+ is the best defense.(18... h5!? 19. Qh4 Nxd1-/+) 19. Bh6!? (19. Rxd1 h5 20. Qh4 Qg6-/+) 19... Qg6! 20. Qxe6+ Rf7-+ Going into the main line, I had looked at 17... Nxd1? before noticing that White plays 18. f7+!+- , of course, and not(18. fxg7? Rf5!-+) b) Also better was 17... Rxf6! 18. Bxf6 Qxf6~/= and Black has a strong initiative. 18. Bh6 Qd7? Fritz finds a drawing defense in 18... Qe8! 19. Qg4+ Qg6 20. Qxe6+ Rf7 21. Qe8+! Rf8! (I had only examined 21... Rxe8?? 22. Rxe8+ Rf8 23. Rxf8#) 22. Qe6+ Rf7= with perpetual. 19. Ra1?! White can afford to take his time with Black's King so permanently exposed, but this move loses a lot of momentum. Faster, however, is 19. Qg4+! Kh8 20. Bxf8 Nxd1 21. Bh6 Nb2 19... Rf7 20. Re3 Nb5 21. Nb3 b6 22. Rae1 e5? ...just when I was pulling it together! This is the most fatal error. Black has a saving resource in 22... Re8! 23. Qg4+ ( White must have something slower, but we could find nothing clear after 23. c3~/= Nd6 24. Qg4+ Kh8 and now what is better than 25. Rxe6 Rxe6 26. Qxe6 Qxe6 27. Rxe6 Re7=/+ with the same thing?) 23... Kh8 24. Rxe6 Rxe6 25. Qxe6 Qxe6 26. Rxe6 Re7=/+ and Black may even have the edge here since he will win the pawn at d4. 23. dxe5 fxe5 24. Rg3+ Kh8 25. Rxe5! Re8? White to play and mate in four: Black can soldier on a bit with 25... Nbd4 or 25... Nd6 26. Bg7+! Kg8 26... Rxg7 27. Qxe8+ Qxe8 28. Rxe8+ Rg8 29. Rexg8# 27. Qxh7+! the prettiest, but also winning was 27. Bf6+ Kf8 28. Rxe8+ Qxe8 (28... Kxe8 29. Rg8#) 29. Qh6+ Rg7 30. Qxg7# or 27. Rxe8+ Qxe8 28. Bf6+ Kf8 29. Qh6+ Rg7 30. Qxg7# 27... Kxh7 28. Rh5+ Kg8 29. Rh8# 1-0 [Michael Goeller]


Frank James Marshall - Horace Ransom Bigelow [D63]

9th American Chess Congress/Lake Hopatcong, NJ USA (10) 1923


1. d4 d5 2. Nf3 Nf6 3. c4 e6 4. Nc3 Nbd7 5. Bg5 Be7 6. e3 b6? 7. cxd5! exd5?! 7... Nxd5 8. Nxd5 exd5 9. Bxe7 Qxe7 10. Rc1 Qb4+ 11. Qd2+/= 8. Rc1 O-O 9. Bd3 Bb7 10. O-O c5 11. Bf5 Ne4 12. Bxe7 Qxe7 13. Bxd7! Qxd7 14. dxc5 Nxc5 15. Qd4+/- Rad8 16. Rfd1 Rfe8 17. h3 h6 18. Ne5?! 18. Qf4 Ne4 19. Nd4+/- 18... Qf5 19. Nd3?! Nxd3?! 19... Ne6! 20. Qe5 Qg6=/+ and ...d4 to follow. 20. Rxd3 Re7 21. e4! Qf4 22. Rcd1 Red7 23. exd5 Qxd4 24. Rxd4 Kf8 25. f4 Rd6 26. g4 a5 27. Kf2 g6 28. Re4 R8d7 29. h4 Rc7 30. g5! h5 31. Red4 Rc5 32. R1d3 Rd8 33. a3! Ba8 34. Na4 Rcxd5 35. Rxd5 Rxd5 36. Rxd5 Bxd5 37. Nxb6 Bb3 38. Ke3 Ke7 39. Kd4 Ke6 40. Nc4 Kf5? 40... a4 41. Nxa5 Bd1 42. Nc4?! 42. Ke3 Kg4 43. b4 Kxh4 44. b5 Kg3 45. b6 Bf3 46. b7 Bxb7 47. Nxb7 h4 48. Nc5 h3 49. Ne4+ Kg2 50. Nf2 h2 51. a4+- 42... Kxf4 43. b4 Kg3 44. b5 Kxh4 45. Ke3 Ba4 46. b6 Bc6 47. Kf2?! 47. Kf4+- 47... Kxg5 48. a4 Kf6 49. a5 Ke7 50. a6 Kd8 50... Kd7 51. Ne5+ Kd6 52. Nxf7++- (52. Nxc6?? Kxc6-+) 51. Nd6?! Much faster is 51. a7! when Black is in zugzwang, unable to prevent Nd6, b7, and a8=Q. For example: 51... Bd5 (51... Kd7 52. Ne5++-) (51... Ba8 52. Nd6 Kd7 53. b7 Bxb7 54. Nxb7 Kc7 55. a8=Q) (51... Kc8 52. Nd6+ Kd7 53. b7+-) 52. Nd6 Kd7 53. b7 Kxd6 54. b8=Q++- 51... Kd7! 52. Nxf7 52. b7?? Kc7= 52... Bd5 53. Ne5+ Kc8 54. Nxg6 Bb7 55. Ne7+! Kb8 56. axb7 Kxb7 57. Nd5 1-0 [Michael Goeller]


Morris Schapiro - Frank James Marshall [D39]

9th American Chess Congress/Lake Hopatcong, NJ USA (11) 1923


1. d4 d5 2. Nf3 Nf6 3. c4 e6 4. Nc3 Bb4 Marshall's favorite move, which he used to great success in his game against Kupchik earlier in the tournament. 5. Bg5 The right answer. 5... c5!? 5... dxc4!= 6. e3 Qa5?! Too aggressive. 7. Bxf6 gxf6 8. Qb3?! Better 8. cxd5! Bxc3+ (8... exd5 9. dxc5+/-) 9. bxc3 exd5 (9... Qxc3+ 10. Nd2 exd5 11. Rc1+/-) 10. dxc5 Qxc3+ 11. Nd2 Nc6 (11... Qxc5?? 12. Rc1) 12. Rc1+/- 8... Bd7!? 9. a3 dxc4 10. Bxc4 Rg8!? 11. O-O! Bxc3 12. bxc3 b5 13. Be2 Bc6 14. Rfd1 Nd7 15. Ne1 c4 16. Qc2 f5 Strengthening his grip on the light squares. 17. Bf3!? 17. a4! 17... Bxf3 18. Nxf3 Nf6 18... Nb6?! 19. e4! fxe4 20. Qxe4 Qxc3 21. Ne5!|^ 19. a4! Ne4 20. axb5 Qxc3 21. Qa4 Qb2 22. Ra2?! 22. Rf1!! with the thread of ...b6 22... Qb3 23. Qxb3 cxb3 24. Rfb1+/- 22... Qb3 22... Nc3!? 23. Rxb2 Nxa4 24. Rc2+/- 23. Rc1?! 23. Qxb3! cxb3 24. Rb2 Nc3 25. Ra1 Nxb5 26. Rxb3 Nd6 27. Ra6+/- 23... Nc3! 24. Qxb3 cxb3 25. Rb2 Nxb5 26. Rxb3 a6= 27. Ne5 Ke7 28. Nc6+ Kd6 29. Nb4 Rgc8 30. Ra1 a5 31. Nd3 Rc3 32. Rxb5 Rxd3 33. Kf1 a4 34. Ke2 Rc3 35. Kd2 Rc6 36. Ra3 Rac8 37. Rc5 Rxc5 38. dxc5+ Rxc5 39. Rxa4 Rc7 40. Ra8 Rb7 41. Rh8 f6 42. Ke2 e5 43. Kf3 Rg7 44. g3 Ke6 45. h4 Kf7 46. h5 Rg5 47. Rxh7+ Kg8 48. Rh6 Kg7 49. Rg6+ Rxg6 50. hxg6 Kxg6 51. g4 fxg4+ 52. Kxg4 f5+ 53. Kh4 Kh6 54. f4 exf4 55. exf4 Kg6 56. Kg3 Kf7 57. Kf2 Ke6 58. Ke3 Kd5 59. Kd3 Kc5 1/2-1/2


Frank James Marshall - Vladimir Sournin [D15]

Masters Tournament/Lake Hopatcong (12) 1923


1. d4 Nf6 2. Nf3 d5 3. c4 c6 4. Nc3 Bf5 5. cxd5 Nxd5!? 5... cxd5 6. e3 6. Qb3!? Nxc3! (6... Nb6?! 7. e4+/-) (6... Qb6?! 7. Qxb6 axb6 8. Nxd5 cxd5 9. Bf4+/=) 7. bxc3+/= (7. Qxb7? Nd5! 8. Qxa8 Qc7 traps White's Queen.) 6... e6 7. Bd3 Bb4 8. Qc2 Bxd3 9. Qxd3 Qc7?! 9... >= Qa5 10. Bd2 Qa6= 10. O-O Nd7 11. e4 Nf4?! 11... >= Nxc3 12. bxc3 Be7+/= 12. Bxf4 Qxf4 13. Ne2 Qc7 14. Rac1 O-O 15. e5!? Rfd8 16. Qe4 Nf8? 17. d5!+/- f5?? 18. Qxb4 1-0


David Janowski - Frank James Marshall [D03]

9th American Chess Congress/Lake Hopatcong, NJ USA (9) 1923


1. d4 d5 2. Nf3 Nf6 3. Bg5 e6 4. e3 c5 5. Nbd2 Nc6 6. c3 Bd6 7. Bd3 h6 8. Bh4 O-O 9. O-O e5 10. dxe5 Bxe5 11. Nxe5 Nxe5 12. Bc2 b6 13. h3 Ba6 14. Re1 Nd3 15. Bxd3 Bxd3 16. Nf3 Be4 17. Ne5 17. Nh2! 17... Qd6 18. Bg3 Qe6|^ 19. f3 Bh7 20. Nd3 Bxd3= Marshall seeks to avoid a Bishops of opposite color ending. 20... Qf5!? 21. Nf4 Qg5 22. Bf2 Rad8=/+ 21. Qxd3 Rad8 22. a4 c4! Seizing critical light squares. 23. Qd4 Nd7 24. Bh4 f6 25. e4 Ne5 26. Bg3 Nd3 27. Re2 27. exd5 Qxd5 28. Qxd5+ Rxd5 29. Re7 Rf7-/+ 27... dxe4 28. Rxe4 Rxd4 29. Rxe6 Rd5 30. Rc6 Nxb2-/+ 31. Ra2 Rd2 32. Bf4 Rd1+?! 32... Rc2 33. a5 bxa5 34. Rxa5 Re8 35. Rxa7 Ree2-/+ 33. Kh2 Nd3 33... Rb1 34. Bg3 f5 35. f4 Re8 36. Rxc4 Nc5 37. a5 Re4 38. axb6 axb6 39. Rb4 Rxb4 40. cxb4 Ne4 41. Ra8+ Kh7 42. Rb8 Nd2? Black can dominate White's Bishop beginning with 42... Rd3! 43. Be1 (43. Bh4 g5!) 43... Re3 44. Bh4 g5 45. fxg5 hxg5 46. Bxg5 Nxg5 47. Rb7+ Kg6 48. Rxb6+ Ne6-/+ 43. Bh4?! 43. Bf2! 43... Nf1+ 44. Kg1 Ng3+ 45. Kf2? It's not clear why Janowski declined the draw. 45. Kh2! Nf1+= 45... Ne4+ 46. Ke2 Nc3+ 47. Kf2 Rd4 48. Be7 Rxf4+ 49. Kg3 Re4 50. Bf8 Re6 51. Rb7 Rg6+ 52. Kf3 Kg8 53. Be7 Nd5 54. Bd8 Re6 55. Kf2 Rd6 56. Rb8 Kf7 57. b5 Ke6 58. Kf3 g5 59. g4 fxg4+ 60. Kxg4 Ke5 61. Rc8 Ke4 62. Rc4+ Ke5 63. Rc8 Ke6 64. Rb8 Kd7 65. h4 gxh4 66. Bxh4 Ne3+ 67. Kf3 Nc4 68. Ke4 Re6+ 69. Kd4 Na3 70. Rd8+ Kc7 71. Rd5 Nc2+ 72. Kc3 Ne3 73. Bg3+ Kc8 74. Rh5 Ng4 75. Kd4 Rg6 76. Bf4 Nf6 77. Rh1 Ne8 78. Kd3 Kd7 79. Be3 Rd6+ 80. Kc4 Re6 81. Kd3 Nd6 82. Rh5 Nf7 83. Bd4 Rg6 84. Rd5+ Ke7 85. Rh5 Rd6 86. Rf5 Rg6 87. Rh5 Ng5 88. Kc4 Re6 89. Kd5 Rd6+ 90. Kc4 Re6 91. Rh1 Nf7 92. Ra1 Nd6+ 93. Kd5 Nxb5 94. Be5 Kd7 95. Rg1 h5 96. Rg5 Rh6 97. Rg7+ Ke8 98. Bf4 Rf6?! 98... Nc3+ 99. Ke5 Rc6 100. Rh7 b5 99. Be5 Rf7 A bad plan, after which White's mating threats force at least a draw despite his two pawn deficit. 100. Rg6 Nc7+ 101. Kc6 Nb5 102. Kd5 Kd7 103. Rxb6 Nc7+ 104. Bxc7 Kxc7 105. Rh6 1/2-1/2


Albert Beauregard Hodges - Frank James Marshall [C49]

9th American Chess Congress/Lake Hopatcong, NJ USA (13) 1923


1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 Nf6 3. Nc3 Nc6 4. Bb5 Bb4 4... Nd4!? 5. O-O O-O 6. d3 d5 A typical Marshall move. 7. Nxd5 >= 7. Bxc6 bxc6 8. Nxe5 Qe8!? (8... Bxc3 9. bxc3 dxe4 10. dxe4 Qxd1 11. Rxd1 Nxe4 12. Nxc6 Nxc3=) 9. f4 dxe4~~ 7. exd5?! Nd4!= 7... Nxd5 8. exd5 Qxd5 9. Bxc6 bxc6 Black now has the two Bishops and control of the center to compensate for his doubled pawns. But the doubled pawns are a long-term liability. 9... Qxc6 10. Nxe5+/= 10. Qe2 Re8 10... Bg4! 11. a3 Bf8 12. Bd2 Bg4 13. h3 Bxf3 14. Qxf3 e4! 14... Qxf3 15. gxf3 Rab8 16. b3= 15. Qg3 Re6 Black might be able to obtain an edge by 15... Bd6 16. f4 Qd4+ 17. Kh1 Qxb2 18. dxe4 Qxc2 19. Bc3 Bf8 20. e5 but Marshall did not like to surrender the initiative for a mere pawn, especially when that pawn was doubled on an open file. 16. Bc3 exd3 17. Qxd3 Qxd3 18. cxd3 Rd8 19. Rfd1 Red6 20. Kf1 20. d4?! c5-/+ 20... Rxd3 21. Ke2 R3d5 Black now has a pawn advantage, but the damage to his queenside pawns makes it nearly impossible to exploit. 22. Rac1 f6 23. Bd2 Bc5 24. Be1 Re8+ 25. Kf1 Bb6 26. Rd2 Re6 27. Rdc2 c5 28. f3 Red6 29. Ke2 Rg5 30. Kf1 Rgd5 31. Ke2 Re6+ 32. Kf1 Rd3!? It is difficult for Black to develop a plan for exploiting his extra pawn. Marshall's idea is to try to attack White's queenside pawns. But there is nothing there and Marshall eventually risks getting the worse of it in order to create some unlikely winning chances. 33. Bf2 Rb3 34. Rb1 Re5 35. Be1 Rd3?! 35... Rd5!=/+ 36. Rbc1 Red5 37. Ke2 Rb3 38. Bc3 Kf7 39. Rd2 c6 40. Rcd1 Ke6 41. Re1 Bc7 41... c4 42. Kd1+ Kf7 43. Kc2 Rb7 44. Red1 Rxd2+ 45. Rxd2 Ke6 46. Re2+ Kd7 47. Kd3 Bh2 48. Kc4 Bg1 49. Re1 Bf2 50. Re2 Bg1 51. Re1 Bf2 52. Re2 Bg1 53. Re1 Bh2 54. Kxc5 Rb5+ 55. Kc4 Be5 Now it is Black who must grovel for the draw. 56. Re2 Rd5 57. a4 a6 58. b3 g5 59. Bxe5 fxe5 60. Kc3 c5 61. Re4 h6 62. h4 Ke6 63. hxg5 hxg5 Now Black has four pawn islands to White's two, which should create some winning chances. 64. b4? The former U.S. champion was obviously content with a draw against the current champ. Otherwise, he might have avoided any exchanges of Black's weaker pawns for his own and tried immediately to attack them with Rook and King. In fact, White could actually win by 64. Rg4! Kf5 (64... Rd1!? 65. Rxg5+/-) 65. Kc4 Rd4+!? (65... Rd7 66. Kxc5+-) 66. Kxc5! (66. Rxd4?? exd4-+ would actually lose due to the protected passed pawn for Black) 66... Rxg4 67. fxg4+ Ke4!? (67... Kxg4? 68. b4 e4 69. Kd4 Kf4 70. b5 axb5 71. axb5 e3 72. Kd3 Ke5 73. Kxe3+-) 68. b4 Kd3 69. b5! axb5 70. axb5 e4 71. b6 e3 72. b7 e2 73. b8=Q e1=Q 74. Qb3+ Kd2 There is no way to avoid the exchange of Queens and no good way to accept it.(74... Qc3+ 75. Qxc3+ Kxc3 76. Kd5+-) 75. Qb4+ Ke2 76. Qxe1+ Kxe1 77. Kd4+- 64... cxb4+ 65. Rxb4 Rc5+ 66. Rc4 Kd5 67. Rxc5+ Kxc5 68. g3 Kd5 69. Kd3 a5 70. g4 Kd6 71. Ke4 Ke6 72. Ke3= 1/2-1/2 [Michael Goeller]


Christopher M. Williams (2057) - Stephen Stoyko (2300) [A04]

6th Judah Ash Memorial/Lawrenceville, NJ USA (2) 2005


1. Nf3 Nf6 2. g3 g6 3. Bg2 c5 4. d3 Nc6 5. O-O Bg7 6. e4 d6 7. Nc3?! This is practically a blunder. 7... O-O 8. h3 Rb8 9. Be3 e5 10. Qd2 Nd4! 11. Ne1 b5 12. f4?! b4 13. Nd1 It's amazing how quickly Black gets a strong initiative. The only problem is how to break through. 13... exf4 14. gxf4 Nh5 15. c3 bxc3 16. bxc3 Nb5 17. a4 Trappy 17. Rb1!? 17... Nc7 17... Qa5? 18. Rb1! 18. Nf3 Kh8! "I am very proud of this move--I think it is extremely strong, because White now is kind of stuck. He has no pawn moves and there are no cross-checks on a2. The move says to White, 'Show me what you can do because I'm going to play f5 and kill you if you do nothing.'" 18... f5!? 19. Nf2 f5 20. Rad1?! 20. e5 Nd5=/+ 20... Ne6! 21. exf5 Rxf5 22. d4? Nexf4 23. dxc5 Nxg2 24. Kxg2 Bb7 24... Rxf3 Fritz 25. Ng4 Qh4 26. Qxd6 Rbf8 27. Ngh2?! 27. c6 Bxc6! 27... Be5! 28. c6 Qg3+ 0-1 [Stoyko]


Stephen Stoyko (2600) - Lubomir Ftacnik (2300) [B08]

6th Judah Ash Memorial/Lawrenceville, NJ USA (3) 2005


1. d4 Nf6 2. Nf3 g6 3. Nc3 "This takes him out of his Gruenfeld." 3... Bg7 4. e4 d6 5. Be2 O-O 6. O-O c6 "Karpov (and I) think this sucks." It puts no pressure on the center. The ideal set-up for White is Bd3, Qd2, Rad1, h3, Re1, Bf1, g3, Bg2 and White gets a squeeze since Black has no good ideas. 7. a4! Stops all black expansions. 7... a5 8. h3 Na6 9. Be3 Nb4 The Knight on this square has no real prospects, but White's problem is that he cannot drive it back comfortably. It's not a good move, but tactically it's playable. 10. Qd2 10. Nd2 e5 10. Qc1 with the idea of Nd2, Nc4, maybe f4, with lots of possibilities 10... d5!? 10... d5 11. e5 Ne8 12. Na2!? "I knew this was a mediocre move." He played it to "stick it" to the GM, forcing him to think and play something bad. It puts the onus on the higher rated player to find something in a position where he is weaker. 12. Ne1! f6 13. f4+/= but this puts the onus on White to prove that he can attack successfully on the kingside. 12... Nxa2 13. Rxa2 This must favor White since the Black Knight moved three times to be exchanged. White has the better pieces. His Rook and Queen are constrained by the need to protect the a-pawn. The Knight at e8 is his best piece, but it has no good future. The White pieces meanwhile are optimal, but for the Rooks and the Knight at f3, which can easily re-deploy. 13... f6 14. Bh6 Nc7 15. exf6 15. Ra3 Ne6 16. Bxg7 Kxg7 17. Re3 c5 15... exf6 16. Re1 Re8 17. Bxg7 Kxg7 18. Bd3 This stops Black's Bishop from developing comfortably and again puts the onus on Black. 18. Ra3 Bf5 18... Rxe1+ 19. Qxe1 Qd6! 20. Ra1 Bd7 21. Qd2 Ne6 22. g3 Stopping Nf4 22. Re1 22... b6 23. c3 c5 Now White's a-pawn becomes a target--tables turned. 24. Bf1 Re8 25. Bg2 c4 26. h4 26. b3!? 26... Nc7 27. Nh2 Bf5 28. Nf1 Be4 29. Ne3 If Black exchanges Bishops then he has the target on d5 and no chances to attack a4. 29... f5 30. Bxe4 Rxe4 30... fxe4 31. b3!? (31. Ng4!?) 31... cxb3 32. Qb2 Rf8 33. Qxb3 Rf3 31. Ng2 Qd7 32. f3 Re8 33. Kf2 Ne6 34. Nf4 Nxf4 35. Qxf4 Qe7 36. Qd2 f4! 37. Rf1! The idea to be able to play Qxf4 or Qf4 and allow the King to drop back to g1-- and if he takes things on the Queenside the Queen on f4 gives counterplay. 37... fxg3+ 38. Kxg3 The idea is that if ...Qe2 then Rf2 is an easy draw, because even if he goes after the a-pawn then b3 is White's saving idea. 38... Qd7 39. Qf4 Qe6 39... Qxa4 40. Qc7+= 40. Rf2 Re7 41. Kg2 41. h5!? gxh5 42. Rh2 Qe1+ 43. Kh3 41... Qf6 42. Qxf6+ Kxf6 43. b3! Re3 43... cxb3 44. Rb2 b5 45. Rxb3 bxa4 46. Ra3 Re3 47. Kf2 Rd3?? 48. Ke2+- 44. bxc4 dxc4 45. Rb2 Rxc3 46. Rxb6+ Kf5 47. Kg3! Rb3 48. Rc6= 48. Ra6! 48... c3 49. Rc5+ Ke6 50. Rxa5 Rb4 51. Rc5 Rxa4 52. Rxc3 Rxd4 53. Rc6+ Kd7 54. Rc3 Rd5 55. Re3 1/2-1/2 [Stoyko]


Thomas Bartell (2360) - Stephen Stoyko (2300) [A28]

6th Judah Ash Memorial/Lawrenceville, NJ USA (4) 2005


1. c4 e5 2. Nc3 Nf6 3. Nf3 Nc6 4. e3 Be7 4... Bb4 5. Qc2 d6 5. d4 exd4 6. Nxd4 O-O 7. Be2 d5 8. cxd5 Nxd5 9. Nxc6 bxc6 10. Bd2 Bf6 11. O-O Rb8 12. e4 Nxc3 13. Bxc3 Bxc3 14. bxc3 Qxd1 15. Rfxd1 Be6<=> 16. f4? Rb2 17. Kf1 f5! Gives White a protected passed pawn, but it is well blockaded and meanwhile Black is getting good play. 17... Rxa2? 18. Rxa2 Bxa2 19. Ra1 (19. c4!?) 17... Bxa2 18. Rd7 17... f6 18. f5 Bf7 19. Rd7+/- 17... Rfb8? 18. a4 (18. f5 Bxa2) 18... Rxe2 19. Rab1 (19. Kxe2 Bg4+ 20. Ke3 Bxd1 21. Rxd1+/- Kf8 22. Rd7 Rc8 23. e5 Ke8 24. e6) 19... Rxb1 20. Rxb1 18. e5 18. exf5 Rxf5! 19. g3 (19. Rd8+ Kf7 20. Ra8 Rxf4+ 21. Bf3 g5! (21... Bd5!-/+) (21... Ra4?! 22. Bxc6 Raxa2 23. Rxa7 (23. Rxa2 Rxa2-/+) 23... Rxa1+ 24. Rxa1 Ke7=/+) 22. Kg1 (22. h3 Bd5-/+) 22... g4 23. Bxc6 Rc4 24. Be8+ Ke7) 19... g5 (19... Rc5) 18... Rfb8 19. Ke1 Kf8 19... Bxa2 20. Rxa2! Rxa2 21. Bc4+ 20. Rd2 Rxd2 21. Kxd2 Rb2+ 22. Ke3! Ke7 22... Rxa2? 23. Rxa2 Bxa2 24. Kd4 a5 25. Kc5 Bd5 26. g3 23. h3 c5 24. g4 g6 25. a4 1/2-1/2 Bartell offered a draw, which Steve accepted due to the complexity of the position and the clock situation. After the game, though, he became convinced that Black was better. Best was: 25... a5 26. g5 Bd5=/+ 27. Kd3 Ke6 27... Be4+ 28. Ke3 Rc2 29. Ra3 28. h4 c4+ 29. Ke3 Rc2 30. Ra3 c5 31. h5 Rb2 32. hxg6 hxg6 33. Bd1! Be4 34. Be2 34. Bf3? Rb3 34... Kd5 35. Ra1 Bb1 36. Bf3+ Ke6 37. Bc6~~ 1/2-1/2 [Stoyko]


Frank James Marshall - Roy Black [D64]

9th American Chess Congress/Lake Hopatcong, NJ USA (8) 1923


1. d4 Nf6 2. Nf3 d5 3. c4 e6 4. Nc3 Nbd7 5. Bg5 Be7 6. e3 O-O 7. Rc1 c6 8. Qc2 dxc4?! 8... Ne4! 9. Bxe7 Qxe7 10. Nxe4 dxe4 11. Qxe4 Qb4+ 12. Nd2 Qxb2= Soltis 9. Bxc4 Nd5 10. Bxe7 Qxe7 11. O-O Nxc3 12. Qxc3!+/= "Stopping ...e6-e5 and thereby limiting Black to passivity" writes Soltis. 12... b6 13. e4 Bb7 14. Rfe1 Rfd8 15. d5! "Elementary but thematic exploitation of the e-file pin" writes Soltis. 15... Nc5?! 15... cxd5 16. exd5 Bxd5? (16... Nf8 17. dxe6 Nxe6 18. Bxe6 fxe6[] 19. Qe3+/=) 17. Bxd5+- 15... e5 16. dxc6 Bxc6 17. Bxf7++/- 15... c5!? Fritz 16. Qe5? Inaccurate play by the champion. The correct way of executing Marshall's plan is by 16. dxe6! Nxe6 (16... fxe6 17. b4+/-) 17. Qe5!+/- 16... Kf8? Black could actually obtain the advantage here with 16... cxd5! 17. exd5 Bxd5 18. Bxd5 Nd3! 19. Rc7 (19. Qc7 Qxc7 20. Rxc7 Rxd5-/+) 19... Qf8 17. Qh5+/- cxd5 17... Kg8 18. b4 g6 (18... Nd7 19. dxe6 fxe6 20. Ng5+- Soltis) 19. Qh6 Nd7 20. dxc6! Bxc6 21. Bxe6! fxe6 (21... Qxe6? 22. Ng5 Qf6 23. Rxc6!+-) 22. Rxc6+/- 18. exd5 >= 18. Qxh7+/- 18... Bxd5? 18... >= h6 19. Bxd5 Rxd5 20. Qxh7+- Qb7 21. Qh8+ Ke7 22. Qxg7 Rf5 23. Nd4! Rf6 24. Qg5 Black cannot stop Nf5+ without surrendering the Rook. 1-0


Vladimir Sournin - Oscar Chajes [A45]

9th American Chess Congress/Lake Hopatcong, NJ USA (8) 1923


1. d4 Nf6 2. Bf4 d6 3. Nf3 Nbd7 4. Nc3 c6 5. e4 Qa5 6. Bd2 6. Bd3 e5!= 6... Qc7 7. Bd3 e5 8. O-O h6 9. Re1 g5?! 10. dxe5?! 10. Ne2! exd4 11. Nfxd4+/- with the idea of Ng3 and Ndf5 10... dxe5= 11. Ne2 Nc5 12. Bc3 Bd6 13. Ng3 Be6 13... Na4 14. Qd2 Bg4=/+ 14. Nf5 Bxf5 15. exf5 Ncd7 15... O-O-O! 16. Qd2 O-O-O 17. b4? Rhe8-/+ 17... g4!? 18. Nh4 e4-> 18. Bc4 e4 19. Nd4 Bxh2+ 20. Kf1 Bf4 21. Qe2 Nb6?! Much stronger was 21... Ne5! placing the Knight to a much more active post and blocking the dark-squared Bishop's long diagonal. 22. Ne6! fxe6 23. Bxf6 exf5! 24. Bxd8 Qxd8-/+ Black's exchange sacrifice maintains his strong positional edge. 25. Bf7 Re7 26. Bg6 Qf8 27. g4! e3!? 27... fxg4 28. Qxg4+ Kb8 29. Bxe4=/+ 28. Bxf5+ Kb8 29. f3?! h5 30. Kg2 hxg4 31. fxg4 Bd6 32. c4 Bxb4 33. Rh1 Qg8 34. Bd3 a5?! 34... Na4 35. Raf1 35. Rh5! Nd7 36. Rah1~~ 35... Na4 36. Qf3 Ka7 37. Be4? Qxc4 38. Qxe3+ Bc5 39. Bd3 Qxa2+ 40. Rf2 Qxf2+! Forcing a won ending. 41. Qxf2 Bxf2 42. Kxf2 Nc5 43. Bf5 b5 44. Rh6 Kb6 45. Rg6 a4 46. Rxg5 a3 47. Bb1 Ne4+! 0-1


Horace Ransom Bigelow - Abraham Kupchik [C30]

9th American Chess Congress/Lake Hopatcong, NJ, USA 1923


1. e4 e5 2. f4 Bc5 3. Nf3 d6 4. c3 Nf6 5. d4!? 5. fxe5 dxe5 6. Nxe5 Qe7 7. d4 Bd6 8. Nd2 Bxe5 9. dxe5 Qxe5 10. Bd3 Nc6= 5... exd4 6. cxd4 Bb6 6... Bb4+ 7. Bd2 Bxd2+ 8. Nbxd2 O-O 9. Bd3+/= 7. Nc3 O-O 8. f5? This advance, often appropriate when Black has a pawn at e5, is completely incorrect here since White's laggard e-pawn now becomes a target, and if e-pawn falls or steps forward then the f-pawn will hang. Better 8. e5 dxe5 (8... Ng4!? 9. Bc4~~) 9. fxe5 Nd5 10. Bc4+/= 8... Re8-/+ Forcing White's next. Equally strong or stronger was 8... Nxe4! 9. Nxe4 Re8 10. Nfg5 Bxf5 11. Bc4 d5 12. O-O Bxe4-+ 9. Kf2 d5! 10. e5 10. exd5 Bxf5-/+ 10... Ne4+ 11. Nxe4 dxe4 12. Bg5 White is already lost. Not much better was 12. Ng5 Bxd4+ and Black wins White's whole set of center pawns. 12... Qd5! 13. Be3 Surrendering a piece to hang onto some pawns. 13. Nh4 Bxd4+ 14. Be3 Bxe3+ 15. Kxe3 Qxe5-+ 13... exf3 White could now resign, but instead stubbornly resists through the time control before surrendering. 14. Rc1 Bxf5 15. Bc4 Qd7 16. gxf3 Nc6 17. Rg1 Bxd4 18. Bxd4 Qxd4+ 19. Qxd4 Nxd4 20. Bxf7+!? Kxf7 21. Rxc7+ Re7 22. Rxg7+ Kxg7 23. Rxe7+ Kg6 24. Rxb7 Kg5 25. Rb4 Ne6 26. Kg3 Rd8 27. Rb7 Rd2 28. Rxa7 Rxb2 29. Rf7 Bg6 30. Rf6 Nd4 31. f4+ Kh5 32. Ra6 Be4 33. f5 Bxf5 34. Kf4 Bg6 35. e6 Re2 36. Ra5+ Kh6 37. Ra6 Nxe6+ 38. Kg3 Nd4 39. a4 Nf5+ 40. Kh3 Kg5 41. a5 Bh5 mate is unavoidable. 0-1


J. L.. McCudden - Horace Ransom Bigelow [B12]

9th American Chess Congress Qualifier/New York, NY USA 2005


1. e4 c6 2. d4 d5 3. e5 Bf5 4. Bd3 Bxd3 5. Qxd3 e6 6. Ne2 Nd7 7. O-O Qb6 8. Be3 Qxb2 9. Nd2 Qa3 10. c3 b5 11. f4 Nh6 12. h3 Nf5 13. g4 Nxe3 14. Qxe3 Be7 15. f5 c5 16. Rab1 a6 16... Qxa2? 17. Ra1 Qc2 18. Rfc1= 17. Nf3 cxd4 18. Nfxd4 exf5? 19. e6! fxe6 20. Nxe6 Qd6 21. Rxf5 >= 21. Nxg7+! Kf7 22. Nxf5+- 21... g6 22. Rxd5! Qb6 22... Qxd5 23. Nc7+ 23. N2d4! Nf6 24. Re5 Ra7 25. g5 Nh5 26. Re1 Qd6 27. Nc6! Rb7 28. Nxe7 Rxe7 29. Nc7+ Kd8 30. Rxe7 Rf8 31. Re8+ Kxc7 32. Rxf8 Qxf8 33. Qa7+ Kd6 34. Qxa6+ Kc7 35. Qa7+ Kc6 36. Re6+ Kd5 37. Qd7+ Kc4 38. Qd4# 1-0


Abraham Kupchik - Frank James Marshall [D43]

9th American Chess Congress/Lake Hopatcong, NJ USA (7) 1923


Marshall annotates this game in his book "My Fifty Years of Chess," where he calls this "one of my best games." He prefaces it with the following: "It is delightful to observe how Black's advantage in development sweeps over all resistance. Open lines give him the initiative in short order." White makes no obvious blunders but only plays a bit passively, which invites Marshall to cause trouble.

1. d4 d5 2. Nf3 e6 3. c4 Nf6 4. Nc3 Bb4 Marshall writes: "Black has a wide choice here: 4... Nbd7 4... Be7 4... c5 or 4... c6 . However, I like the text best, because of its aggressive tendencies." 5. Qb3 Marshall thinks better is 5. Qa4+ Nc6[] 5... c5 5... Nc6!? 6. cxd5 exd5 7. dxc5 Marshall suggests that "here or next move 7. Bg5 was better. The text opens lines for Black, and the following move is too conservative." 7... Nc6 8. Bd2?! Be6! "Already threatening to win a piece with ...d4." 9. Ng5 O-O!=/+ Black strives for speedy development at every turn and already has a slight edge. The time-wasting 9... Nd4!? 10. Qd1! (10. Nxe6!?) 10... O-O 11. e3 Nc6 12. Be2 (12. Nb5!? Bg4!|^) 12... Bf5 13. O-O gives White good chances of equalizing. 10. e3 Nd7! 11. Nxe6 fxe6-/+ "Black has splendid prospects, what with his superior development and the open f-file." 12. Bb5 Nxc5 13. Qd1 d4! "With this energetic push Black opens up the game further to his advantage" writes Marshall. 14. exd4[] Nxd4 15. Bc4 Qh4!-+ At every turn Marshall strives to increase his development and the scope of his pieces. White is already lost yet he has made no obviously bad moves other than the overly cautious 8.Bd2?! 16. O-O Rad8!? Marshall foregoe s cashing in on his advantage in order to develop his last piece to its best square! In his notes, Marshall gives this move an exclamation mark and writes that the apparently stronger 16... Nf3+! 17. gxf3 Qxc4 "yields a winning positional advantage; but the text is even more convincing." 17. Be2?! Better resistance might be offered by 17. f4! 17... Bxc3 18. bxc3 Ne4! "Decisive because of the pressure on the d-file. There is really no good counter to the threat of Nxd2 followed by Nf3+. 19. cxd4 Marshall notes that "Amusing would be 19. Kh1? Nxd2 ( Fritz prefers the stronger 19... Rxf2!) 20. Qxd2? (20. cxd4 Nxf1-+) 20... Nf3 and the Queen is lost just the same!" 19... Rxd4 20. Qb3?! White can first force Black's Knight out of position with the tricky 20. Bg5! Nxg5 21. Qc2-/+ though Black is still winning. 20... Nxd2 21. Qxe6+ Kh8 22. g3 "There was no escape from material loss: if 22. Rfe1 Qxf2+ 23. Kh1 Re4-+ and wins." 22... Qe4! Marshall always preferred to simplify once he had won material. 23. Qxe4 Rxe4 24. Bd3 24. Rfe1 Rfe8 25. Rac1 h6-+ 24... Rd4 White must surrender the exchange or lose a piece. 25. Bc2 Nxf1 26. Rxf1 b5 27. Kg2 Rd2 "The ending is an easy win" remarks Marshall. 28. Bb3 a5 29. a4 Rb2 30. Bd1 Rb1 31. axb5 Rd8 32. Bg4 Rxf1 33. Kxf1 a4 34. b6 Rb8 0-1 [Goeller, and Fritz Marshall]


Greg Tomkovich - Herb Hickman [A85]

Kenilworth CC at West Orange CC/West Orange, NJ USA 2005


1. d4 f5 2. c4 Anyone who plays the Dutch must be ready to encounter any number of lines that White can throw at him, including 2. Bg5!? hoping for 2... h6 3. Bh4 g5 4. e3 (or 4. e4!?) 4... Nf6 (4... gxh4?? 5. Qh5#) 5. Bg3 d6= 2. e4!? fxe4 3. Nc3 Nf6 4. f3~/= 2. g4!? fxg4 3. e4 d5!=/+ 2... Nf6 3. Nc3 g6 4. Bf4 A solid idea for White, working to control the dark squares. It is probably rare when a club player of the Dutch faces the supposedly "standard" 4. Nf3 Bg7 5. g3 d6 6. Bg2 4... d6 5. h3 This move might not be necessary, since White would not mind Black wasting time to exchange at f4, when exf4 retains the dark-square bind with extra time and the better minor pieces for the closed position. 5... Bg7 6. Nf3 O-O 7. e3 Qe8!? To support a potential ...e5 push. But this seems premature and commital. Usually Black prepares central action by c6 and Nbd7, when the Queen might go to c7 or a5 rather than e8 depending on what White does. 7... Ne4 8. Nb5?! This seems a bit off-base as a way of trying to "punish" Black's last. Fritz 8 likes 8. c5!? dxc5?! 9. Bc4+ e6 10. Bxc7+/= Other ideas to delay Black's central plans include 8. Qb3 Kh8 9. Nd5 or 8. Nd5!? Na6 9. Nxf6+ Bxf6 10. c5!? 8... Na6 9. Qb3 Kh8 9... c5!= 10. Bd3 Be6?! Black has much better in 10... Nd7! which forces through ... e5! and has the potential to fork the f3-Knight and d3-Bishop with ...e5-e4. 11. d5 11. O-O 11... Bg8 12. O-O Nc5 13. Qc2 Nxd3 14. Qxd3 Qd7 15. Rac1 c6 16. Nc3 Rfd8 Preparing Black's next. A better idea, though, may be 16... b5! 17. cxb5 (17. dxc6 bxc4 18. cxd7 cxd3=/+ 19. Rfd1 (19. Bg5 e5!-/+) 19... e5!? 20. Bxe5 dxe5 21. Nxe5 Rad8 22. Rxd3 Ne4-/+) 17... Nxd5 18. bxc6 (18. Nxd5 Bxd5) 18... Qxc6 19. Nxd5 Qxd5 20. Qxd5 Bxd5 and Black's two Bishops and pressure against White's queenside pawns guarantee him a slight edge. 17. Rfd1 e5! 18. dxe6 Qxe6 19. b3 Ne4 19... d5! 20. cxd5 Nxd5 21. Bg5 Rd7 22. Nxd5 Rxd5 23. Qe2 h6=/+ 20. Ne2?! d5! 21. cxd5?! 21. c5~~ 21... Rxd5 22. Qc2 Rad8 23. Rxd5 Qxd5 24. Ned4 h6 25. Kf1 c5 26. Ne2 b6 27. Ng3? g5! 28. Bc7 Rc8 29. Rd1 Qe6 30. Bd8 Nxg3+ 31. fxg3 Bh7 Black's natural break-through is by 31... c4!-+ 32. Qd2 g4 33. Nh4 Bd4? Black is too obsessed with trying to win White's wayward Bishop. Simply continuing with his attack by 33... f4! 34. exf4 gxh3 or 33... gxh3 34. gxh3 f4! guarantees Black a substantial edge. 34. exd4 Rxd8 35. d5! Suddenly the lowly isolated pawn from e3 is transformed into a powerhouse passer at d5! Black has clearly done something wrong. 35... Qe5? Black is clearly reeling from the reversal of his fortunes. Der Blockade by 35... Qd6 is necessary. 36. Qxh6 Rd6 37. Qf8+! Bg8 38. Nxf5 Rd7 39. Qh6+ Better is 39. Re1! getting all the gang involved in the attack. 39... Rh7 40. Qf4 Qf6 41. d6!? From this point on White has a number of ways to force the win. >= 41. Qxg4 41... gxh3 42. gxh3 Be6 43. g4 Bd7 44. Qg3 Bb5+ 45. Kg1 Bd7 46. Ne7 Rf7 47. Qg2 47. g5! 47... Qe6 48. Qa8+ Kh7 49. Qg8+ Kh6 50. Qh8+ 50. g5+!+- 50... Rh7 51. Qf8+ Kg5 51... Rg7 52. Nf5++- 52. Rd5+! Kh4 53. Qf2+! Kxh3 54. Qg2+ >= 54. Rd3+! forces mate by 54... Kxg4 55. Rg3+ Kh5 56. Qh2+ Qh3 57. Rxh3+ Bxh3 58. Qxh3+ Kg5 59. Qf5+! Kh4 60. Ng6+ etc. 54... Kh4 55. Nf5+ Kg5 56. Ng7+ winning the Queen. 1-0


Mike Wojcio - Charles Hart [B22]

Kenilworth CC at West Orange CC/West Orange, NJ USA 2005


1. e4 Nf6 2. e5 Nd5 3. c4 Nb6 4. c5 Nd5 5. Bc4 Mike notes: "This is the 'chase variation.' I played it against Arthur Bisquier in the Bermuda Open around 1989 and lost. Arthur played the same Kf8 move against me. I also played it against Roz Katzson who is a master. He played a variation giving up the exchange. I am very prepared against that variation today." 5... e6 6. Nc3!? White does not have to play a gambit. The superior 6. d4 d6 (6... b6!?) 7. cxd6 cxd6 8. Nf3 Nc6 heads toward the familiar isolani territory discussed recently by Steve Stoyko at the club. 6... Nxc3 7. bxc3 7. dxc3!? Bxc5 8. Qg4 g6 9. Bh6 d5~~ 7... Bxc5 8. d4 Be7 8... Bf8!? 9. Qg4 Kf8 I always prefer 9... g6 in situations like this, but neither is especially appealing. Of course not 9... O-O? 10. Bh6!+- 10. f4 10. Ne2!? 10... h5 10... d5 11. Bd3 c5 11. Qf3 Mike notes that 11. Qh3! would help support g4 or f5 with better attacking chances than in the game notes Scott Massey. 11... d5 12. Bd3 g6?! ...then he should have played this in the first place. 12... c5! 13. Ne2 Kg7 14. O-O h4?! This seems like a risky idea since it potentially weakens the kingside defenses. Black should seek counterplay via the queenside. 15. Qg4 Rh5?! 16. Be3 Nc6?! Blocking the c-pawn is simply wrong-headed. 16... b6! with ideas like c5 and Ba6 looks more reasonable. 17. Rf2 17. Rf3! Na5 18. Rh3 Nc4 19. Bxc4 dxc4 20. Ng3 Rh8 21. Ne4! Qd5 22. Ng5|^ 17... Bf8 18. Raf1 Ne7 19. Qf3 Nf5 White is down a pawn with no obvious plan. 20. g3 20. Bxf5?! exf5!=/+ (20... Rxf5? 21. g4+/-) 20. g4 hxg3 21. Nxg3 Rh4=/+ 20... hxg3 21. hxg3 Rh3 22. Kg2?? Nh4+ 23. Kxh3 23. gxh4 Rxf3 23... Nxf3 24. Rxf3 f5!? Good timing, since White does not benefit from capturing. Better, though, may have been to try to open up lines on the queenside and activate his forces with 24... c5-+ 25. g4!? Be7 26. g5!? White creates chances of attack down the h-file. 26... c5?! Finally! But maybe the right plan at the wrong time. Black's queenside play may actually distract him from necessary defense, since now White develops a very strong kingside attack. Close analysis suggests that it was necessary for Black to play 26... Qg8! and build up a kingside defense. 27. Kg2 Qa5 28. Rh3 Kf7 29. Rh8! Tying up Black's queenside forces. 29... c4 30. Rfh1! Bf8[] All other moves allow mate! 31. R1h7+ Ke8? It's never good to walk into a pin. Better 31... Bg7! 32. Bb1 b5 33. Bd2 Bb7 allows Black to extricate himself. Now he gets in trouble. 32. Bb1 Qb6 No better was 32... Bd7 33. Bc1! (33. Rxf8+!? Kxf8 34. Rxd7~~ (or 34. Rh8+ Kg7 35. Rxa8 Ba4!~~) ) 33... Rc8 (33... Rd8 34. Rg7!) 34. Rg7 Qa4 35. Rxg6-> and the passed g-pawn gives White a winning edge. 33. Bc2 Better 33. Bc1!! Anyway. 33... Qa5 (33... Qxb1?? 34. Ba3 and Black cannot prevent mate.) 34. Rg7! Bd7 35. Rxg6! Kf7 36. Rgg8 Bg7 37. Rxa8 Bxh8 38. Rxh8+- 33... Bd7 34. Bc1!! 34. Rxf8+!? Kxf8 35. Rh8+ Ke7 36. Rxa8+/= 34... Qa5 35. a4!! Forcing the Bishop to a3 to take maximum advantage of the back-rank pin. 35... Kd8 Desperation, but there was no hope in 35... Rc8 36. Ba3+- 36. Rxf8+ Be8 37. Ba3+- Mike played so brilliantly once he lost his queen that you would almost think he sacrificed it! 1-0 [Michael Goeller]


Abraham Kupchik - Oscar Chajes [A33]

9th American Chess Congress/Lake Hopatcong, NJ USA (12) 1923


1. d4 Nf6 2. Nf3 e6 3. c4 c5 4. Nc3 cxd4 5. Nxd4 Nc6 6. e4 Bb4 7. Nxc6 bxc6 We now have a Sicilian Defense. 8. Bd3 h5!?N This is a novelty that does not appear to have been repeated in master play. At the time, the most common moves were 8... d5 or 8... Bxc3+ 9. bxc3 d5 Today most commonly seen in this position is 8... e5 . Chajes's innovative 8....h5!? appears at first doubtful and reminiscent of his overly aggressive kingside advances against Marshall in the same tournament. But further analysis suggests that it is difficult for White to prove it incorrect if Black continues in this aggressive fashion. 9. O-O Castling into Black's attack is risky, as the course of the game demonstrates. White probably must look for a better counter here. I could find only one other game in the databases featuring Black's aggressive move. That game continued: 9. Qa4!? Bc5?! (This is obviously bad since it allows White to gain a dark-square bind. Perhaps Black can improve by 9... Bd6!? 10. f4 e5) (or 9... Bxc3+ 10. bxc3 Ng4 11. Ba3 Qh4!?) 10. h3 Rb8? Obviously Black had no idea what he was doing. 11. e5!+/- Ng8 12. Ne4 Bb4+ 13. Kf1 (13. Bd2! Bxd2+ 14. Kxd2!! eliminating Black's dark-squared Bishop is even stronger.) 13... a5?! 14. c5!+- White's dream position for dark-square domination. 14... f5 15. Nd6+ Kf8 16. Be3 f4 17. Bd4 Qh4 18. a3 f3 19. Be3 1-0 Dunn-Ady 1985 Perhaps White should investigate the natural 9. Bf4 and if 9... Ng4!? 10. f3 (10. h3 Qf6 11. hxg4!? (11. Qd2 Ne5=) 11... Qxf4 12. gxh5 is an idea) 10... Qf6 11. Qd2 Ne5 12. Be2 with some edge for White. 9... Ng4!? 10. Qf3 White must play carefully to drive back Black's apparently premature aggression on the kingside. It was easy to give Black good play by 10. h3?! Ne5 11. Bf4 Qf6 12. Ne2 g5!-> or 10. Bf4 Qf6 11. Bc7 Bc5|^ 10... g5!? Black continues with his seemingly premature attacking plan. White likely expected 10... Ne5 11. Qg3! Nxd3 12. Qxd3+/= with excellent play against Black's dark squares.(12. Qxg7? is too doubtful) Safest perhaps was 10... d6 11. Qg3 e5!~~ though it's not clear if this represents an improvement on the more standard 8...e5. 11. Qg3! d5 12. e5?! White could simplify things by exchanging with 12. exd5 cxd5 13. cxd5 Bd6 14. Bb5+ Kf8 15. Bxg5!? Bxg3 16. Bxd8 Bxh2+ 17. Kh1 Bb7 18. Bh4 exd5 19. Rad1+/= when Black's pawns and pieces are in disarray. 12... f5!? 13. exf6 Bd6 14. f7+!? Not 14. Bg6+?! Kd7! 15. Qd3 Ba6!|^ White could play immediately 14. f4!? but perhaps he feared the complications of 14... O-O!! (14... Qxf6 15. h3 (15. cxd5?! O-O!|^) 15... gxf4 16. Bxf4 e5 17. Bxe5 Bxe5 18. Rxf6 Bxg3 19. hxg4+/=) 15. h3 gxf4 16. Bxf4! e5! 17. Bh6 Rxf6~~ 14... Kd7? Too aggressive. Black should accept equality with 14... Kf8! 15. Bxg5! Bxg3 16. Bxd8 Bxh2+ 17. Kh1 Kxf7= 15. f4! Now this move gains in strength. 15... Bb7!? A brave move, preparing to direct his Bishops toward the kingside along the aligned attacking diagonals once the center opens up. White's task is still complicated. If instead 15... gxf4 16. Bxf4 e5 17. Bf5+ Kc7 18. Bd2! Bxf5 19. Rxf5+/- the simplification would highlight White's advantage. 16. cxd5 cxd5!? 17. Qf3 Qc7 Perhaps a better try is 17... Qf6! 18. h3 gxf4 (18... Qxf7!?) 19. Bxf4 (19. hxg4? hxg4!->) 19... Bxf4 20. Qxf4 Qxf4 21. Rxf4 Ne5 22. Bb5+ Ke7 23. Raf1~~ and it is unclear whether White can successfully maintain the advanced f-pawn. 18. Kh1 d4 19. Ne4 Raf8 20. Bb5+ 20. f5! 20... Kd8 21. Qe2 Bxe4 22. Qxe4 gxf4 23. Qxe6 Rxf7 24. Bd2 Re7 25. Qd5 Re5 After a game of such intense complications, it is not surprising that the remaining moves seem to have been played under increasingly extreme time pressure. In any event, White should win. 26. Qa8+? 26. Qxd4!+- Rxb5? 27. Qxh8++- 26... Ke7?? 26... Qb8! 27. Qxb8+ Bxb8 28. Bd3 Rd5 29. Bxf4 Bxf4 30. Rxf4 Ne3 31. g3+/= 27. Qxh8 Rxb5 28. Rae1+ Kd7 29. Qe8# As Helms wrote in his column of this game: "The victory gained by Kupchik over Chajes...was a point well earned by the former state champion." 1-0 [Michael Goeller]


Frank Marshall - Oscar Chajes [A46]

9th American Chess Congress/Lake Hopatcong (4) 1923


1. d4 Nf6 2. Nf3 d6 3. b3 g6 This opening was a rather unusual choice for Marshall, the late Romantic. But he had begun experimenting with more hypermodern modes of development around this time, recognizing how they allowed him to positionally outplay his opponent before the pieces had even really come to grips with each other. 4. Bb2 Bg7 5. Nbd2 Bf5 Not a good square for the Bishop long-term. 6. h3 h5?! Too weakening long-term. 7. e3 c6 8. Bc4!? Inviting ...d5 so that White can dominate the dark squares. 8... Qa5 9. a3 d5 10. Bd3 Ne4 11. b4 Qd8 12. Bxe4 Bxe4 13. Nxe4 dxe4 14. Nd2 f5 Still another positional concession, loosening his kingside. 15. f3 e5 16. O-O exf3?! This helps White get his Queen onto the kingside where Black's advanced pawns present many targets of attack. Better 16... exd4 17. Nb3 O-O 18. Bxd4+/= though White is still much better positionally. 17. Qxf3 exd4? Opening too many lines in the center when his King cannot escape attack. Necessary was 17... O-O even though he will still have to suffer an attack. 18. Qg3!-> Black's King is so exposed by his advanced pawns that he actually must be careful even if White mistakenly plays 18. exd4? Bxd4+ 19. Bxd4 Qxd4+ 20. Kh1!? O-O (20... Qxd2? 21. Qg3!->) 21. Qg3 Qg7~~ 18... Rh6 A terrible place for the Rook. 19. Nf3 With Black's King stuck in the center and lines opening up in the center of the board, White's attack develops naturally. Also possible were 19. Nc4!? or 19. Rae1!? 19... Bf6?! 20. exd4 Nd7 21. Bc1! Notice how the weakened dark squares figure prominently in Black's destruction. The natural 21. Rae1+ Kf7 22. Bc1 h4! gives the hapless Rook at h6 more freedom to escape the Bishop's attack. 21... g5 21... h4? 22. Qe1+!+- 22. Bxg5 Rg6 23. h4 Kf7 24. Qf4 Kg7 Black is lost positionally and is now down material. 25. Qxf5 Qe7 26. Rae1 Qd6 27. Bxf6+ Nxf6 28. Qe5! Marshall, a consummate endgame player, always sought simplification once he was up material, especially as a way of mitigating time pressure. Faster, but much more complicated, was to continue the attack with 28. Ne5 Qxd4+ 29. Rf2! Rh6 30. Qg5+ Kh7 31. Nxc6!!-> 28... Qxe5 29. dxe5 Ng4 30. Ng5 Re8 31. Rf7+ Kg8 32. Rxb7 Nxe5 33. Kh1 a6 34. Nf3 Rge6 35. Rxe5 Rxe5 36. Nxe5 Rxe5 37. Rc7 Re3 38. Rxc6 Rxa3 39. Rc5 There is no hope for Black who is two pawns down and likely to lose another. He resigns as Marshall is about to make the 40 move time control. 1-0


Richard Kimiec (2147) - Mark Kernighan (2213) [B23]

Kenilworth CC Team at West Orange CC/West Orange, NJ USA 2005


1. e4 c5 2. Nc3 Nc6 3. Nge2 Nf6 4. g3 d5 5. exd5 Nxd5 6. Bg2 Nxc3 7. bxc3 Bf5 8. Rb1 Qd7 9. O-O Be6?! 10. Ba3 Bxa2 11. Rb2 Bd5 12. Bxd5 Qxd5 13. Nf4 Qd7 13... Qc4 14. Qf3 14. Bxc5 b6 15. Be3 Rd8 15... e5 16. Ng2 Bd6=/+ 16. Qe2 g6?! 16... e5 17. Rb5!? 17. d4+/= 17... Bg7 18. Rd5 Qb7 19. Rxd8+ Nxd8 20. Qb5+ 20. Bd4 20... Qd7 21. Nd5?! Qxb5 22. Nc7+ Kd7 23. Nxb5 a6 24. Na7? Kc7 25. Rb1 b5 26. c4 bxc4 27. Rb6 Nb7 27... a5 28. Rxa6 Nd6 29. Rc6+ Kd7 30. Rc5 Ra8 31. Nc6 Ra2=/+ 32. Nb4 Rb2 33. c3 e5 34. Ra5 Ne4 35. Ra2?! Rxa2 36. Nxa2 Bf8 37. Kf1 Kc6 38. f3 Nf6 39. Nc1 Ba3 40. Ne2 Kd5 41. h3 Ne8 42. f4 exf4?! 43. Nxf4+= Ke4 44. Ke2 Bb2 45. Bc5 Nf6 46. Be7 Nh5 47. Nxh5 gxh5 48. Bg5? 48. Kd1! Kd3 49. h4+/- and Black will soon be in zugzwang. 48... Ba3=/+ 49. Bf4 Be7? 49... h4!-+ 50. Bc7 Bc5 51. Bf4 Be7 52. Bb8 h4 53. Bf4? hxg3 54. Bxg3 f5-+ and Black soon won on time in a winning position. 0-1 [Michael Goeller]


Abraham Kupchik - Vladimir Sournin [C48]

9th American Chess Congress/Lake Hopatcong, NJ USA (5) 1923


Kupchik organizes a deadly kingside attack in this game after slow maneuvers. And, as Helms writes in his Brooklyn Eagle column, "the combination by means of which Kupchik gained his end was especially spectacular."

1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. Nc3 Nf6 4. Bb5 Nd4 5. Ba4 This is not the most challenging line against the Rubinstein system. 5... Nxf3+ 6. Qxf3 Bb4 This appears later to be a waste of time, since the Bishop soon retreats. Better perhaps 6... c6 7. O-O Be7 8. d3 O-O 9. Bb3 d6 with a tempo on the game line. 7. O-O O-O 8. d3 c6 9. Bg5 Better 9. Qg3 d6 (Not 9... Qa5 10. Bb3 Bxc3 11. bxc3 Qxc3 12. Bh6 Ne8 13. Bg5 Qc5 14. Qh4 Nd6 15. Rae1 with the idea of Re3-Rh3 with a strong attack.) 10. Bg5 with a sharpened version of the game line due to the possibility of Qh4, Bb3, Kh1 and f4. 9... Be7 Better 9... h6 10. Bh4 (10. Bxf6 Qxf6 11. Qxf6 gxf6=/+ and the two Bishops are more significant than the doubled pawns.) (10. Bd2 d5=/+) 10... g5!? 11. Bg3 d6 12. h3 a5! 13. a3 Bc5=/+ and Black controls whole board. 10. Bb3 d6 11. Nd1 a5 12. c3 12. a4= keeps the Bishop on the a2-g8 diagonal and limits Black's ambitions in the center. But Kupchik is content to play a slower maneuvering game with Sournin. 12... h6 13. Bc1 d5 14. Ne3 a4 15. Bc2 g6 To keep the Knight out of f5. 16. h3 To prevent Bg4 once the Knight moves, but possibly contemplating Ng4!? Not 16. Nf5? gxf5 17. Bxh6 f4 18. g3 Bg4-+ 16... Kg7 17. Re1 Be6 18. Nf1 Qc7 19. Ng3 Ng8 20. Qe2 Bd6 21. Be3 f6 22. Rf1 Ne7 23. d4 b5 This allows White to liquidate favorably in the center. Better 23... exd4 24. cxd4 dxe4 25. Nxe4 Nd5 followed by Bf7 and Rfe8 seems a reasonable plan, to play against the isolani long-term. But White would then have a more open position with chances of developing a kingside initiative. 24. dxe5 fxe5 25. Rad1 Rf6 26. exd5 Bxd5? Black seems to have a mistaken notion that his best plan is to try for a kingside attack by doubling Rooks on the f-file and pointing his Bishops in that direction. Better to build a strong center with 26... cxd5 and if 27. Qxb5? d4!-> 27. Qg4! Be6 27... Raf8?? 28. Nh5++- 27... Rff8 28. f4!? (28. Qh4) 28... exf4 29. Nh5+ Kh7 30. Nxf4 Bxf4 31. Bxf4+/= 28. Qh4! Now it is clear that White has the better kingside attacking prospects. 28... Rh8? 29. Rxd6!! Qxd6 30. Qxf6+ Kxf6 31. Ne4+ Kg7 32. Nxd6+- The rest of the game is not of great interest since White is now up a piece. Likely Black played on at first due to a time advantage and then due to his hopes for his advanced pawn at b3. But, after a few slips near the time control, Kupchik slowly strangles all resistance. 32... Bxa2 33. Re1 Nd5 34. Bc5 Kf6 35. c4! bxc4 36. Bxa4 Nf4 37. Ra1 Bb3 White now makes some weaker moves before the time control at move 40. 38. Bxb3?! 38. Bxc6!+- would make White's task easiest. 38... cxb3 39. Ra6?! White should pick up the b-pawn before Black tries to make something of it. 39. Ra3!? 39. Ne4+ Ke6 40. Be3 Rb8 41. Nc5+ Kd6 42. Ra3 39... Ke6 40. Ra3?! 40. Ne4 Kd5 41. f3 40... Ne2+?! 40... Kd5 41. Ra5 Nd3 42. Ba3+ c5 43. Nb5+- would disorganize White somewhat. 41. Kh2 Nd4 42. Ne4 Rb8 43. f3 Kd5 44. Ra7 Nb5 45. Rd7+ Ke6 46. Re7+ Kd5 47. Bd6! Nxd6 48. Rd7 Kc4 49. Rxd6 Rb6 50. Nd2+ Kc5 51. Rd3 winning the b-pawn, after which Black has no hope whatsoever. 1-0 [Michael Goeller]


Jose Rodriguez - Devin Camenares [D43]

Kenilworth CC Summer Tournament/Kenilworth, NJ USA 2005


1. d4 d5 2. c4 e6 3. Nc3 c6 4. Nf3 Nf6 5. Bg5 h6 This move was recommended in the book "The Chess Advantage in Black and White" as a way to reach an interesting game while avoiding the complexities of 5...dxc4 6.e4 h6 6. Bh4 g5 7. Bg3 dxc4 8. e4 b5 9. a4 This move seems to be rare. 9.h4 or 9.a3 could be improvements. 9... Bb4 9...b4 10. Na2 Nxe4 11. Qxc4 Nxg3 12. fxg3 c5 seem stronger, but this seems to be a reasonable alternative. 10. Qc2 Bb7 11. Be2 Chessmaster suggests 0-0-0 instead, but white's king safety seems suspect to me. 11... Nbd7 12. O-O a6 13. Rfd1 Qe7 13...Nh5 may have been better, and I had been considering as a possiblity for the past several moves, but decided to resist a decentralizing move until I ran out of decent alternatives. At this point, White had about 50 minutes left, and Black had about 56 minutes. 14. Na2 I thought poorly of 14. Na2, but black's edge is modest, if at all. 14... c5 15. axb5 Bxe4 Upon playing this move, I thought I had made a mistake that allows him to regain his pawn with 16.Qxc4, to which Chessmaster gives the interesting line 16...axb5 17. Qc1 c4 18. Nc3 Rxa1 19. Qxa1 O-O 20. Nxe4 Nxe4 21. Bc7 Rc8 22. Qa7 and rates it as equal. However, 17. Qxb5 Ra5 18. Qc4 Bd5 19.Nxb4 Bxc4 20.Nc6 Bxe2 21.Nxe7 is probably better for white. At this point, the times were White: 44 minutes, Black 53 minutes. 16. Qa4 This move effectively hands black the game. My opponent spent a fair deal of time before playing it, as the times now stood at White: 35 minutes, Black: 52 minutes 16... Nb6 17. Qxa6 Rxa6 18. bxa6 O-O 19. Nxb4 cxb4 20. Ne5 Bd5 21. Rdc1 Rc8 22. Nxc4 Bxc4 23. Bxc4 Rxc4 24. Rxc4 Nxc4 25. a7 At this point, an onlooker seemed to knod in approval of white's move, but I think white is lost here anyway. 25... Nb6 26. a8=Q+ Nxa8 27. Rxa8+ Kh7 28. Be5 Ng4 While 28...Qb7 might be slightly better, I saw no problem with the move. An onlooker to the game started to shake his head in apparent disapproval after I moved the knight. 29. Rh8+ Kg6 30. Rg8+ Kf5 31. f4 Nxe5 Chessmaster shows a forced mate with 31...Qa7 32. Kf1 Qa1+ 33. Ke2 Qxb2+ 34. Kd1 Ne3+ 35. Ke1 Qa1+ 36. Kf2 Ke4 37. fxg5 Qf1+ 38. Kg3 Qxg2+ 39. Kh4 Qg4# 32. fxe5 Qd7 33. h3 This move and the next two seem to accelerate white's problems by giving away 3 pawns with check. 33... Qxd4+ 34. Kh2 Qxe5+ 35. g3 Qe2+ 35....Qxb2 must have been more accurate. 36. Kg1 Qxb2 37. Rf8 f6 38. g4+ Ke5 39. Rh8 Qd4+ 40. Kg2 b3 41. Rxh6 b2 My gamescore runs out at this point, but as one might guess, the game didn't last that much longer for white. 0-1


Anand Viswanathan - Ftacnik Lubomir [B80]

Izt/Biel (Switzerland) (3) 1993


1. e4 c5 2. Nf3 d6 3. d4 cxd4 4. Nxd4 Nf6 5. Nc3 a6 6. Be3 e6 7. f3 b5 8. g4 h6 9. Qd2 Bb7 10. h4 b4 11. Nce2 d5 12. e5 Nfd7 13. f4 Nc5 14. Bg2 Nbd7 15. O-O-O Be7 16. g5 h5 17. f5 Nxe5 18. Nf4 Nc4 19. Qe2 Qa5 20. Kb1 Nxb2 21. fxe6 O-O-O 22. Kxb2 Na4+ 23. Kc1 b3 24. Nxb3 Ba3+ 25. Kb1 Nc3+ 26. Ka1 Qa4 27. Qd3 Bb4 28. Nc1 Kb8 29. Bd4 Rc8 30. Be5+ Ka7 31. Qe3+ Rc5 32. Rd3 Qxc2 33. Bxc3 Bxc3+ 34. Rxc3 Qxc3+ 35. Qxc3 Rxc3 36. exf7 Rf8 37. g6 1-0


Laukik Gadgil - Joe Demetrick [A08]

KCC Summer Tourney/Kenilworth, NJ USA 2005


While full of errors by both sides, the following game nonetheless features some useful tactical themes which even relatively experienced players such as these can benefit from.

1. e4 e6 2. d3 d5 3. Nc3 More common is 3. Nd2 c5 4. Ngf3 Nc6 5. g3 Bd6 6. Bg2 Nge7 7. O-O with a typical King's Indian Attack position. 3... Bb4 Black could also close the position, though after 3... d4 4. Nce2 Nc6 5. f4!? White has a fairly good game. The chief drawback of 3.Nc3 rather than 3.Nd2 is that Black could now play 3... dxe4 4. dxe4 Qxd1+ 5. Nxd1 Nf6= with complete equality. 4. Bd2 White does not have to directly unpin the Knight to prevent Black from winning it with ...d4. He could alsoplay 4. e5!? d4 5. Qg4 Ne7 6. a3 Ba5 7. b4 dxc3 8. bxa5~~ but not 4. a3?! Bxc3+ 5. bxc3 dxe4 6. dxe4 Qxd1+ 7. Kxd1 Nf6=/+ 4... Nc6 Now 4... d4! 5. Nb1 Bxd2+ 6. Nxd2 e5!=/+ would be very good for Black, who had exchanged off his dark-squared bishop and placed all his pawns on dark--while White has a bad Bishop at f1 hemmed in by pawns on light. 5. Qg4 Nf6! The best way to meet White's premature aggression. 6. Qxg7 Rg8 7. Qh6 Rg6 8. Qe3?? This loses material. But Black would be doing well after the superior 8. Qh4 d4 (8... dxe4?! 9. O-O-O!|^) 9. Nb1 (9. Nce2 Bxd2+ 10. Kxd2 e5~/=) 9... e5~/= 8... d4 The Fork 9. Qe2 dxc3 10. bxc3 Ba5 11. Rb1 e5 12. Nf3 Bb6 13. h3 Be6 14. Rb2 Ke7? Up until now, Black's play has been exemplary. But this is a very bad place for the Black King. Likely he should clear the way for Queenside castling while creating threats against White's weak pawns by 14... Qe7! 15. Nh4 Rg8 16. Nf5 Qa3 17. Rb1 Qxa2-+ 15. g4 h6 16. Nh4 Suddenly White is developing real threats against Black's centralized King. 16... Rg8 17. Bxh6 Qd7 18. Bd2 18. f4!? 18... Rh8 19. Nf3? 19. Nf5+ Bxf5 20. exf5 would open an important line against the Black King. 19... Bxg4! The Pin 20. h4 Rhg8?! 21. Be3 Qd6 22. Bc1 Qc5 23. Rb3 Be6?? 24. Ba3! THE PIN - big time! 24... Bxb3 25. Bxc5+ Bxc5 26. cxb3 Ng4 27. d4 exd4 28. cxd4 Bb4+ 29. Nd2? not a good idea to step into a pin! 29. Kd1!+- 29... Nxd4 30. Qc4 Nc6 31. Bh3?? Nge5! 32. Qe2 Rad8 and Black has a winning attack despite the material deficit. Both players, short of time, stopped recording their moves at this point. 0-1


Michael Goeller (2020) - Mark Kernighan (2216) [B23]

KCC Summer Tournament/Kenilworth, NJ USA (5) 2005


1. e4 c5 2. Nc3 I had actually been planning a surprise alternative but then felt unprepared to try it. 2... Nc6 3. f4 g6 Mark used to play 3... e6 in skittles against me exclusively, but began employing the fianchetto line when we met for our Kenilworth Chess Club Championship playoff game to decide uncontested 3rd place. 4. Nf3 Bg7 5. Bb5 Nd4 6. O-O Nxb5 7. Nxb5 d6 Generally recommended as equal is 7... d5! when an interesting try for advantage is the sharp 8. e5!? d4! 9. c3!? a6 10. Na3 d3! 11. Nc4 b5 12. Ne3 Nh6 13. b3 Nf5 14. Qe1 O-O 15. Ba3 b4? (15... Qc7 16. Qf2 Nxe3 17. Qxe3 c4~~) 16. cxb4 cxb4 17. Bxb4 Qb6 18. Bc3 Bb7 19. Qf2 Nxe3 20. Qxe3 Qxe3+ 21. dxe3 Rfc8 22. Rac1 e6 23. Rfd1 Bf8 24. Bb2 Rc2 25. Rxc2 dxc2 26. Rc1 Be4 27. Kf2 a5 28. Ke2 a4 29. Nd2 Bf5 30. h3 axb3 31. axb3 Ra2 32. g4 Rxb2 33. gxf5 gxf5 34. Kd3 Bc5 35. Kc3 Ra2 36. Nc4 Kg7 37. b4 Ba7 1-0, Hebden-Thorsson, Kopavogur 1994 8. c4! Recommended by Steve Stoyko following my earlier playoff game against Mark. I think I had played either 8. Qe1 or 8. d3 previously. 8... Bd7 I like the sharp 8... a6! 9. Nc3 b5! (9... e6?! 10. d3 (10. d4!+/=) 10... Ne7 11. Be3 O-O 12. Qd2 Qc7 13. Ne2 b6 14. Ng3 Rd8 15. Qf2 f5 16. Rae1~~ 0-1 Andersson,P-Lund,V/Hallstahammar 2001 (36)) 10. d3 (10. cxb5?! axb5 11. Nxb5? Ba6-/+) (10. d4!~~) 10... b4 (10... Bxc3!? 11. bxc3 bxc4 12. dxc4 Rb8=) 11. Ne2 f5 12. e5 Nh6 13. d4 Nf7 14. dxc5 dxe5 15. Qxd8+?! (15. Qa4+!+/=) 15... Kxd8~~ 1-0 Rausis,I-Marcelin,C/Evry 2002 (47) Also playable is 8... Nf6 9. d3 O-O 10. Qe1 a6 11. Nc3 b5 12. Qh4 (12. f5 bxc4 13. dxc4 e6 14. Bg5 Bb7 15. Rd1 h6 16. Bxh6 Nxe4 17. Bg5 Nf6 18. fxg6 fxg6 19. Nd2 Bc6 1-0 Vakhania,A-Balkhamishvili,T/Tbilisi 2002 (19)) 12... b4 13. Ne2 e6 14. g4!? Nd7 15. Qh3 f5? (15... Re8!? 16. Ng5 Nf8~~) 16. gxf5? (16. Ng5! Nf6 (16... h6? 17. Nxe6) 17. e5!+/-) 16... exf5 17. Ng5 Nf6 18. e5 dxe5 19. fxe5 Nh5! 20. Qg2 Ra7 21. Ng3 Qd4+ 22. Rf2 Nxg3 23. Qxg3 Bxe5 24. Bf4 Bxf4 25. Qxf4 Qxf4 26. Rxf4 Re8 27. d4 h6 28. Nh3 g5 29. Rf2 f4 30. Nxf4 gxf4 31. Rxf4 Rg7+ 32. Kf2 cxd4 0-1 Steve Pozarek-Sergei Kudrin/Washington 1990 (32) 9. Nc3 e6? Stoyko thought this was a very bad move. There seem to be a number of alternatives for Black: a) 9... Bc6 10. d3 Nh6 11. Qe1 Qd7 12. f5?! gxf5 13. Bxh6 Bxh6 14. exf5 Qxf5 15. Nh4 Qg5 16. Kh1 O-O-O 17. Rxf7 Rhf8 18. Rxh7 Rh8 19. Rxh8 Rxh8 20. Ne4 Qh5 21. Qg3 Bxe4 22. dxe4 Bg5 23. Nf3 Bf6~~ 1-0 Bogut,Z-Milanovic,D/Neum BIH 2004 (46) b) 9... e5 10. d3 Ne7 11. f5!? gxf5 12. exf5 Bxf5 13. Nh4 Be6 14. Ne4 Qd7 15. Bh6 Kf8 16. Nf6 Qd8 17. Qd2 Ng8 18. Bxg7+ Kxg7 19. Nh5+ Kf8 20. Nf5 h6 21. Nfg7 Ke7 22. Qf2 Kd7 23. Qf3 Kc7 24. Qe4 Qd7 25. b4 cxb4 26. c5 Ne7 27. Rac1 Nc6 28. Nxe6+ fxe6 29. cxd6+ Qxd6 30. Rf7+ Kb6 31. Rc4 a5 32. Qe3+ Ka6 33. Nf6 Rab8 34. Rd7 Qf8 35. Ne4 Kb5 36. Nc3+ bxc3 37. a4+ Ka6 38. Rxc6+ b6 39. Rcc7 Ra8 40. Qe4 Qb8 41. Qc4+ b5 42. Rc6+ 1-0 Roberts,P-Brod,M/Budapest HUN 2003 (42) c) 9... Nh6!? 10. d3?! Stoyko thought the best way to exploit Black's last move was by opening the position with 10. d4! cxd4 11. Nxd4 Qb6? 12. Be3!! Qxb2 13. Ncb5!-> (13. Qd3!?+/-) 10... Ne7 10... Nh6!? 11. Be3 Qb6 12. Qd2 Nc6 13. e5! Stoyko thought a simple move like 13. Kh1 was enough for White to pursue an edge. Later, though, he was persuaded that my sharp line might be good--though he still thought that the move was just too typical of my hurried attacking style. 13... dxe5 14. Ne4 14. Qf2!? Mark had expected 14. fxe5 Nxe5 15. Nxe5 Bxe5 16. Qf2 f5 17. Bxc5 Qc7~~ when Black's King is stuck in the center--but he's used to that! 14... Nd4 14... exf4? 15. Bxc5 Qxb2 16. Qxf4-> 14... Qb4!? 15. Qf2|^ 15. fxe5 Simpler is 15. Nxe5 f5 (15... f6 16. Nxd7 Kxd7 17. b4!|^) 16. Nxc5! Qxc5 17. Qf2+/- 15... Nxf3+ 16. Rxf3 Bxe5 17. Bxc5? We decided after the game that White had two ways to create excellent winning chances: a) 17. Nxc5 Bc6 18. Nxe6 Qxb2 19. Nc7+ Kf8 20. Qxb2 Bxb2 21. Rb1 Rc8 22. Nd5+/- or better b) 17. Nf6+! Bxf6 (17... Kd8 18. Nxd7 Kxd7 19. Rxf7+ Kc8 20. Qf2+-) 18. Rxf6 O-O-O Black cannot save the f-pawn due to his weakness on the dark squares(18... O-O?? 19. Qf2+- among many others) 19. Qf2! Be8 20. Bxc5 Qc7 21. Bxa7+- 17... Bd4+! I had completely overlooked this move in my calculations. I had expected 17... Qc7 18. Qg5!! (18. Qb4!?) 18... Bc6 19. Nf6+ Bxf6 20. Qxf6 Rg8 21. Bd6 (21. Re3!+-) 21... Qd7 22. Rf2 h5 23. Raf1+- 18. Bxd4 Qxd4+ 19. Kh1?! Since an ending is inevitable in this position, White does best to keep his King near the center. 19. Qf2! Qxf2+ 20. Rxf2+/= 19... f5! 20. Qc3 Qxc3 21. Nxc3 Kf7 22. Re1 Rad8 23. Kg1 Rhe8 24. d4 Bc6 25. Rd3 e5 26. d5 I think I offered a draw hereabouts since we both had less than 5 minutes left and I figured--correctly--that he would do much better under the clock pressure since he faced it practically in every game he played. 26... Bd7 27. b4! e4 28. Rde3?! The Rook seems too passively placed here. A better try may be 28. Rd4 Kf6 29. c5 Ke5 30. Rdd1~~ 28... Kf6 29. c5 Rc8 30. Rd1 Stoyko thought it was necessary to play 30. g3~~ sooner or later--and better sooner. 30... Re5 31. a4? Up until this move things were about equal, but now the evaluation shifts toward Black. Better 31. Rf1! Ke7 32. Kf2+/= 31... a5! 32. c6?! bxc6 33. dxc6 Bxc6 34. b5 Ba8 35. Rd6+ Ke7 35... Re6! 36. Rd7 f4!-+ 36. Ra6 f4! 37. Rh3 h5 38. Rxa5 e3 39. Ne2 Rd5?! We were both in terrible time pressure at this point, with flags about to fall. 39... Rd8!-+ 40. Rf3 Rd2! 40... g5! 41. Ra7+ Kf6? 41... Kd6!-+ 41... Ke6 42. Nxf4+ 42. Ra6+? 42. Rxf4+! Ke6 43. Rxa8!? Rxa8 44. Re4+ Kd7 45. Rxe3 Rxa4-+ 42... Ke5 43. Nxf4? Bxf3 My flag fell as soon as he hit the clock with my Rook. Mark then started his own clock and counted 18 seconds left for himself. So it was another narrow victory for Mr. Houdini. 0-1 [Michael Goeller]


Edward Lasker - Abraham Kupchik [D46]

9th American Chess Congress/Lake Hopatcong, NJ USA (6) 1923


1. d4 Nf6 2. Nf3 c6 3. Nbd2 d5 4. c4 e6 5. e3 Nbd7 6. Bd3 Bd6 7. e4 e5!? It is risky for Black to open the position so quickly. 8. exd5 cxd5 9. cxd5 Nxd5 10. O-O exd4 White has a slight edge in development which he increases by not recapturing the pawn. 10... O-O 11. Nc4+/- 11. Nc4 11. Ne4!? 11. Nxd4 O-O would create an odd symmetry, with a line of pieces on the d-file. 11. Re1+!? 11... Be7 12. Nxd4 Nc5 Black is at least two tempi behind in development, which is enough to give White the edge. 13. Nf5! Bxf5 13... Nxd3? 14. Nxg7+! Kf8 15. Bh6 Nxb2 16. Qd4-> 14. Bxf5 O-O 15. Qf3! b5 16. Rd1! bxc4 17. Rxd5 Qe8? The Queen here traps Black's Rook and creates an opportunity for an immediate attack. 17... Qb6 18. Be3 g6 18. Be3 White can immediately win material or get a strong attack by 18. Qh3! g6[] (18... h6? 19. Bxh6->) 19. Bh6! Rd8 (19... gxf5?? 20. Qg3+ mates) (19... Qc6 20. Qc3! Bf6 21. Qxc4 gxf5 22. Bxf8+-) 20. Qc3 f6[] 21. Rxd8 Qxd8 22. Bxf8+- Premature would be 18. Bxh7+? Kxh7 19. Rh5+ Kg8 20. Qh3 f5 21. Rh8+ Kf7 22. Qxf5+ Bf6 23. Rxf8+ Qxf8~~ 18... Ne6 19. Re1 White has tremendous pressure due to his lead in development. 19... Bb4 20. Red1 g6 21. Bh6!? Ng7? However dangerous, Black had to go in for 21... gxf5 22. Qxf5 Qe7 22. Bd7! Qe7 23. a3! Bc5 24. Qc3 Ne6 24... Bxf2+!? 25. Kf1!+- 24... f6 25. Qxc4+- 25. Rxc5! The Rook is immune from capture due to the mate threats on g7. 1-0 [Michael Goeller]


Frank Marshall - Marvin Palmer [C49]

9th American Chess Congress/Lake Hopatcong, NJ USA (6) 1923


1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. Nc3 Nf6 4. Bb5 Bb4 5. O-O O-O 6. d3 d6 7. Bg5 Bxc3 8. bxc3 h6?! This appears to weaken the Kingside. The classic defensive set-ups include 8... Ne7 9. Nh4 c6 10. Bc4 d5 11. Bb3 Qd6= or 8... Qe7 9. Re1 Nd8 10. d4 Bg4 as in the game, but without ...h6. 9. Bh4 Qe7 10. Re1 Nd8 11. d4 Bg4 12. h3 Bxf3 13. Qxf3 Ne6 14. Rad1 g5 This is such a natural consequence to the weakening at move 8 that it hardly warrants a question mark. 15. Bg3 Nf4 16. Bxf4 gxf4 17. g3 fxg3 18. fxg3 Marshall knew how to blast open a position once his opponent had a weakened King. But here the opened lines can lead to exchanges. 18... Kg7 19. Rd2 Nh7 20. h4 Rad8? 20... Qf6! 21. Qg4+ Qg6= 21. Rf2 Rg8 22. Kh2 Qf6 Too late--now White has a strong initiative. 23. Qe3 Qg6 24. Ref1 Rgf8 25. Rf5 c6 26. Bc4 Rd7? 26... f6 27. Qf3 b5 27. h5! Qg4 27... Nf6 with the threat Ng4+ 28. Rxf6!+- 28. Be2 And the Queen is trapped. 1-0 [Michael Goeller]


David Janowski - John S. Morrison [D40]

9th American Chess Congress/Lake Hopatcong, NJ USA (5) 1923


1. d4 d5 2. Nf3 e6 3. c4 c5 4. e3 Nf6 5. Bd3 In such a sharp symmetrical position, this would seem to risk wasting a tempo. But the Bishop has no better square, and an exchange of pawns in the center will clarify things in White's favor. 5... Nc6 6. O-O Bd6 6... Nb4!? 7. Nc3 O-O Black continues the symmetry, which is always risky for the second player. 8. b3 b6 9. Bb2 cxd4 Black finally breaks the symmetry to close down the dark-squared Bishop's long-diagonal by settling a pawn on d4. 10. exd4 Bb7 The Bishop could also develop differently with 10... Ba6 though the position is sharp after 11. Nb5!? (11. a3) 11... dxc4 (11... Bxb5?! 12. cxb5 Ne7 13. Ne5+/=) (11... Be7 12. Ne5+/=) 12. bxc4 Bxb5! 13. cxb5 Nb4= 11. Re1 Rc8?! Black makes the first innacuracy. 12. cxd5 exd5 13. Bf5! Ra8 14. Ne5 g6 15. Bh3 Re8 16. Nb5 Bb4 17. Re3 a6 18. Na3 Ne4 19. Nc2! Less accurate is 19. Bd7?! Nxf2! 20. Kxf2 Rxe5! 21. dxe5 Qxd7~/= which appears to give Black sufficient compensation for the exchange. 19... Nxe5 19... Bd6 20. f3 Nf6 21. Qe1+/= 20. Nxb4 Nc6 21. Nd3 f5 22. g3 A multi-purpose move, keeping Black's Queen out of h4, providing the Bishop a retreat square, and strengthening White's grip on the dark squares. 22... Qf6 23. Nf4 Ne7? A critical error which gives White a powerful grip on the e-file which decides the game. 23... Rad8 24. f3 (24. Bg2 g5!?) 24... Ng5= 24. f3 Ng5 25. Bg2 b5? Black would only lose a pawn after 25... Nc6 26. Nxd5 Qd6 26. Qe2! Qd6 27. Re1 A powerful line-up of the heavy pieces which some have called "Alekhine's cannon." 27... Kf8 Necessary was 27... Ne4 28. fxe4 dxe4 though this seems tanatamount to resignation. 28. Ne6+ Nxe6 29. Rxe6 Qb4 29... Qd7 30. Ba3! 30. Qe5 Bc6? Defending the Rook with the hope of moving the Knight, but this allows a speedy finish. 31. Bc1?! This adds quite a few extra moves to the finish. Black could have been mated immediately with 31. Qh8+! Ng8 (31... Kf7 32. Rf6#) 32. Rf6# 31... Ng8 32. Bh6+ Nxh6 33. Qh8+ and mate next move. 1-0 [Michael Goeller]

Game(s) in PGN