Jose Raul Capablanca - Edward Lasker [D52]

Lake Hopatcong/Lake Hopatcong, NJ USA (1) 1926


1. Nf3 Nf6 2. c4 c6 3. d4 d5 4. Nc3 e6 Annotator C. S. Howell writes: "This gives Black a cramped game and, in my opinion, is inferior to 4... dxc4 " when today's "book" line goes 5. a4 Bf5 6. e3 (6. Ne5!?) 6... e6 7. Bxc4 Bb4 8. O-O and White has recovered his pawn, though the battle still rages over the e4-square. 5. Bg5 Nbd7 6. e3 Qa5 The Cambridge Springs Defense, popularized in the 1904 tournament in that Pennsylvania resort town. 7. cxd5 The safest line for White. Not 7. Bd3? dxc4! 8. Bxc4 Ne4!-/+ Stronger may be 7. Nd2 Bb4 8. Qc2 7... exd5?! Much better is 7... Nxd5 8. Qd2 Bb4 9. Rc1 O-O= 8. Bd3 Ne4 9. O-O Ndf6 9... Nxc3?! 10. bxc3 ( Howell also suggests 10. Qe1 Bb4?! 11. a3+/=) 10... Qxc3 11. e4 (11. Qe2!?~/= Howell) 11... dxe4 (11... h6 12. Bh4!? g5 13. Bg3~/=) 12. Bxe4 Bd6 13. d5 (13. Qb1!?) 13... c5 14. Rc1~/= 10. Bxf6! Nxc3?! Better 10... Nxf6 though, as Howell suggests, White would then be able to centralize his knight with 11. Ne5 (also possible is 11. a3 Bd6 12. b4+/= or the similar) (11. Re1 Bb4 12. Qc2 O-O 13. a3 Bd6 14. b4+/= and Black has the two Bishops to compensate for White's space advantage on the queenside.) 11. bxc3 gxf6 Now Black's pawns are permanently damaged--just the kind of long-term target that Capablanca liked to gain out of the opening. In compensation, Black controls e5, has an open g-file, and the two Bishops. But as Howell points out, "doubled and isolated pawns...lose more often than open files win." 12. Qc2 Bd6 13. Bf5!? Trying to gain the f5 square for his Queen, from which he can exploit Black's doubled pawns. 13... Be6 14. Rab1 Qc7 15. Bxe6!? Trading one advantage for another. Now White opens the position favorably for his pieces while Black's pawns at e6 and f6 remain weak. 15... fxe6 16. e4 O-O-O Howell notes that castling queenside is "Dangerous, of course, in view of the open b-file, but Black's game is shaky and his evident intention is to try for a King's side attack, utilizing his own open Knight file. Unfortunately White has both the center and the initiative and, as will be seen, his attack proceeds so rapidly [that] Black has not time to counter-attack." 17. c4! Bf4?! Howell writes: "...this loses time and takes the B away from the defence of the K. However, Black may have wanted to prevent the posting of a white R on c1 or, forseeing e5, to be sure to keep the White Knight out of g5. A better resistance might have been madewith" 17... dxc4 18. Qxc4 Qf7 19. e5 ( perhaps better 19. Rb3! Bc7 20. Rfb1 Bb6 21. a4->) 19... Bc7 20. Rb3 Rd5! 21. Rfb1 Bb6~~ 18. Rb3 The Rook clears the way for its partner to double on the b-file while also gaining maximum mobility along the third rank. 18... dxc4 19. Qxc4 Qf7 20. Rfb1 Rd7 21. e5 Cutting off the Bishop's retreat so that the Black King is denuded of defenders. 21... fxe5 22. dxe5 Rhd8? Howell writes: "This looks like an oversight but probably was not. Black is in danger of being slowly but surely strangled to death and, therefore, plays desperately to exchange a piece or so in hopes of relieving the pressure." 22... Rc7 23. Ne1!? (23. g3 Rg8 24. Kh1 Bh6 25. Nd4+/-) (23. a4) 23... Bxe5 24. Qc5 Qg7 25. Nf3 Rg8 26. g3 Bf6 27. Qxa7-> 23. Qxc6+! Kb8 23... bxc6?? 24. Rb8+ Kc7 25. R1b7# 24. g3 Rd1+ 25. Kg2 The natural 25. Rxd1 Rxd1+ 26. Kg2 gives Black an extra tempo. 25... Rxb1 26. Rxb1 Rd5 27. Qc3 Not 27. gxf4? Qg6+ 28. Kh3 Qxb1 and White must try for a perpetual check with 29. Qe8+ Kc7 30. Qe7+ Kc6 31. Qxe6+ Kc5 32. Qc8+ Kb6 33. Qe6+= 27... Qf5 27... >= Bh6 28. Qb4! b5 29. Nh4 a5 30. Qxb5+! Simplification combined with material gain completes the game. "Of course, if 30...Rxb5 31.Rxb5+ K moves 32. Nxf5. A good example of the champion's direct and forceful play against a cramped defence" writes Howell. 1-0 [C.S. Howell / M. J. Goeller / Fritz / Junior]


Ted Mann (1436) - Joe Demetrick (1447) [C45]

Kenilworth Summer/Kenilworth, NJ (3) 2005


I got the better of Ted the last time that we played in the Club Championship where he had an ill-advised Bishop sacrifice in a c3 Sicilian opening. In this game, White gains some initiative in the opening, gives it back, and Black repeatedly passes on ways to end the game quickly

1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. d4 exd4 4. Nxd4 Bc5 5. Be3 Qe7?! loses the way in the opening, and Ted gains the initiative 5... Qf6 6. c3 Nge7 7. Bc4 a much better response than what was played in the game... 6. Nf5!? White may be trying too hard here to prove Black's last move an error. Better is simply 6. Nc3! and Black's Queen will eventually feel misplaced. 6... Nxd4 7. Bxd4 Nf6 8. Bc4 O-O 9. O-O Bxd4 10. Qxd4 d6 11. Rae1 Re8 12. f4+/= Goeller 6... Qxe4 7. Nxg7+ Kf8 8. Nc3 8. Nd2 Qe5 9. Nc4 is recommended by Fritz (Demetrick)...but Black has 9... Bb4+! 10. c3 Bxc3+! 11. bxc3 Qxc3+ 12. Bd2 Qxg7 and it is unlikely that White has compensation for his two pawns. Goeller 8... Qe5 9. Nh5 interestingly, this position felt worse while playing the game at this point - Black's King is not in a good spot - Fritz analyzes as =+ Demetrick 9... Bxe3 10. fxe3 Qxe3+ 11. Be2 Nge7 Better 11... Nd4! 12. Rf1 d6 and it is hard for White to avoid exchanges that will make Black's extra pawn tell. Goeller 12. Rf1?! White has to play more aggressively to get compensation: 12. Nf6!? or 12. Nb5 Qe5 (12... Rg8!? 13. Qd3!+/=) 13. Qd2~/= 12... Rg8 12... Nd4! 13. Rf3?! Qg1+ 14. Bf1 d6 trying to get more pieces into the fray 14... Rxg2 and it gets a little crazy with.. 15. Rxf7+ Kxf7 16. Qf3+ Ke8 17. Nf6+ Kd8 18. Qxg2 14... Qxh2!? 14... Ne5!? 15. Nf6 Rg7?! a little too passive.. 15... Rxg2! 16. Qd3 Ne5 16... Qxh2 16... Rg6 17. Nxh7+ Rxh7?= 17... Ke8-+ and everything seems to hang for White 18. Qxh7 Nxf3+ 19. gxf3 Qe3+ 20. Ne2 20. Be2 much better... 20... Ng6 21. Kf1 Be6 22. Re1 20... Qxf3 20... Ng6! 21. O-O-O! Bg4 22. Re1? 22. Qh6+! Kg8 (22... Ke8? 23. Qh8++-) 23. h3 (23. Nf4?? Qxd1#) 23... Bh5 24. Nc3 makes Black's king very uncomfortable. 22... Ng8?! 22... Qe3+! 23. Kb1 (23. Kd1 Ng6-+) 23... Ng6-/+ and White cannot unravel his pieces. Goeller 23. Kb1? Qf2!-+ 24. Rc1 Re8? fails again to win the game... 24... Bxe2! 25. Bxe2 Qxe2 26. Rg1 what I feared in this variation... but Black sidesteps the attack with 26... Ke7! 27. a3 Nf6 Demetrick 25. Nc3 25. Ng3 supporting the Bishop 25... Re1 26. b3 Rxc1+ 27. Kxc1 25... Re1 26. Qd3 Rxc1+?! here I think in retrospect that the idea is to maintain the tension, but I decided to go into the endgame a pawn up 26... Bf5!! 27. Kxc1 Qe1+ 28. Nd1 Qxd1+ 29. Qxd1 Bxd1 30. Kxd1 c5 setting the pawns on the dark squares 31. c4 b6 32. a4 Ke7 33. Kd2 Ke6 34. Bg2 Ne7 35. Kd3 Ke5 36. h4 Kf5 36... Ng6! 37. h5?? Nf4+-+ 37. h5 Kg5 38. Bf3 f5 keeping the King out.. 39. Ke3 Ng8 40. b3 Nf6 41. h6 Kxh6 42. Kf4 Kg6 43. Ke3 Nd7 44. Bc6 Ne5 0-1


Laukik Gadgil - Greg Tomkovich [B76]

KCC Summer Tournament/Kenilworth, NJ USA (1) 2005


1. e4 c5 2. Nf3 d6 3. d4 cxd4 4. Nxd4 Nf6 5. Nc3 g6 6. f3 Bg7 7. Be3 O-O 8. Qd2 Re8 This is very slow. More common is 8...Nc6 which has the same effect of preventing 9.Bh6 exchanging off the Bishops. 9. O-O-O Nc6 10. g4 Bd7 11. h4 Rc8 12. h5 Ne5 13. hxg6 fxg6 14. Bh6 Bh8 15. Qh2 Nc4 16. Bg5 Nxb2 17. Bxf6 Bxf6 18. Qxh7+ Kf8 19. Qxg6 Rxc3 20. Rh7 Wow! That's a strong move. How does Black avoid mate? 20... Rxc2+ 21. Nxc2 Ah! White can simply decline the Rook and play 21.Kb1!! and there is nothing that Black can do about mate at f7. 21... Be6 22. Bb5 Nxd1 23. Bxe8 Qxe8 24. Qxe8+ Kxe8 25. Kxd1 Bxa2 26. Kd2 White is still a little better, having the exchange for a pawn and a potentially winning passed pawn on the kingside. 26... a5 27. Rh5 a4 28. Rb5 White starts to go wrong. It was best to activate his own pawns and keep his Rook on the kingside with f4 and g5. 28... Bb3 29. Rxb7 Bb2 30. Ke3 Bc1+ 31. Kd3 d5 32. exd5 Bxd5 33. Rb8+ Kf7 34. Nd4 a3 35. Rb6 a2 36. Nc2 Bxf3 37. Kd4 Bxg4 38. Ra6 Be6 39. Nb4 A blunder. White should still hold the draw with best play, though it wil be hard. 39... a1=Q+ 40. Rxa1 Bb2+ 0-1


Laukik Gadgil - Mark Kernighan [B66]

KCC Summer Tournament/Kenilworth, NJ USA (2) 2005


1. e4 c5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. d4 cxd4 4. Nxd4 Nf6 5. Nc3 d6 6. Bg5 e6 7. Qd2 Be7 8. O-O-O a6 9. Bc4 Bd7 10. f3 Qc7 11. Bb3 Na5 12. Rhe1 b5 13. Nd5 Nxb3+ 14. axb3 exd5 15. exd5 Kf8 16. Bh6 Ng8 17. Rxe7 Nxe7 18. Qg5 gxh6 19. Qxh6+ Kg8 20. Re1 Qd8 21. Ne6 fxe6 22. dxe6 Nf5 23. Qh3 Qg5+ 24. Kb1 Re8 25. exd7 Rxe1+ 26. Ka2 Kf7 0-1


Mike Wojcio - Mike Goeller [B00]

KCC Summer Tournament/Kenilworth, NJ USA (3) 2005


1. e4 Nc6 2. Nf3 d6 3. c3 This move wastes time, since White can easily play 3.d4 without this extra support. The move also makes it difficult to defend the e-pawn comfortably, as we shall see. Most of my games go 3.d4 Nf6 4.Nc3 Bg4 = 3... Nf6 4. Qe2 Bg4 5. g3 The Bishop needs to develop, but this move weakens the support of the Knight at f3 and hands Black the initiative. 5... d5 Mike almost played 6.e5? Nxe5! 6. exd5 Qxd5 7. Bg2 O-O-O 8. d4 e5 9. c4 A blunder, but White is in trouble. 9... Qa5+ Black can also win a pawn by 9...Nxd4!? but this is stronger. 10. Bd2 Bb4 11. d5 e4 I wanted to open the e-file, but likely 11....Nd4! is even stronger. 12. O-O Nd4 Easier is simply 12...exf3. Now White loses his Queen but gets some tricky tactics against my king. 13. Nxd4 Bxe2 14. Bxb4 Qxb4 15. Nxe2 Qxb2 16. Nbc3 Qb4 17. Nb5 Qxc4 18. Ned4 Qxd5 19. Nxa7+ Kb8 20. Nab5 c6 21. Nxc6+ Qxc6 22. a4 Rd2 23. Rac1 Qb6 24. Nc3 e3 25. Rb1 exf2+ 26. Kh1 Rb2 27. a5 Qb3 28. Rxb2 Qxb2 29. Na4 Qb4 30. Nb6 Qxa5 31. Rb1 Qe1+ 0-1


Javier Moreno - Michael Goeller [B00]

Kenilworth CC Summer Tournament/Kenilworth, NJ USA (2) 2005


1. e4 Nc6 2. Nf3 d6 A rather typical position arising from the Nimzovich Defense. 3. a3?! Bg4 Black is now relatively equal. White really gains next to nothing from his pawn push, since no Black piece is kept out of b4. 4. d3 e6 5. Be2 Nf6 6. Bg5 h6 7. Bxf6?! Willingly surrendering the two Bishops is not a good idea in this relatively open position. 7... Qxf6 8. c3 O-O-O 9. b4?! 9. d4!? 9... d5 "The best way to meet an attack on the wing is in the center." 10. exd5 10. b5? dxe4 11. bxc6 exf3 12. cxb7+ Kb8 13. Bxf3 Bxf3 14. gxf3 Qg6-/+ 10... exd5 11. b5 11. d4 11... Ne5 12. Nd4 12. Nxe5 Qxe5 13. d4 Qe6 14. h3 Bh5 15. Kf1 12... Bxe2 13. Qxe2 Bc5! 14. O-O 14. Nb3? Bxf2+! 15. Qxf2?? Nxd3+-+ This appears to win a pawn fairly easily. But keeping material on theboard to organize a kingside attack was probably a stronger option, especially given Black's lead in development. 14... Bxd4 14... Rhe8! 15. Nb3 Qh4!? 16. h3 Bd6 17. d4 Ng6|^ 15. cxd4 Ng6 16. Qb2?! 16. Qg4+ Kb8 17. Nc3 h5-/+ 16... Nf4 17. a4 Nxd3 18. Qc3 Nf4 19. Kh1 Ne2 20. Qd3 20. Qh3+ Kb8 21. Nc3 20... Qxd4 21. Qxd4 Nxd4 22. Nc3 Nb3 With the idea of inviting the Rook to abandon the back rank while repositioning the Knight to support a pawn push tod3 and beyond. 23. Ra3 Nc5 24. Rd1 d4 25. Na2 Rhe8 26. a5? d3 27. b6? d2! 28. Re3 axb6 29. axb6 Nd3 30. h3? Nxf2+ 31. Kh2? Rxe3 32. Rf1 Re1 32... d1=Q 33. Rxd1 Rxd1 34. g4 Ne4! mates more quickly. 33. Rxf2 d1=Q 34. g4 Qd6+ 35. Kg2 Qc6+ 36. Kg3 Rg1+ 37. Kh4 g5+ 38. Kh5 Qg6# 0-1


Pete Cavaliere - Mark Kernighan [A22]

KCC Blitz Tournament/Kenilworth, NJ 2005


1. c4 e5 2. Nc3 Nf6 3. d3 d5 4. Bg5 d4 5. Ne4 Nxe4 6. Qa4+ Bd7 7. Bxd8 Bxa4 8. dxe4 Bb4# 0-1


Ernesto Labate - Scott Massey [A45]

Westfield Club/Westfield, NJ 1983


1. d4 Nf6 2. Bg5 c5 3. c4? cxd4! 4. Nf3() e5 5. Nbd2 5. Nxe5 Qa5+ 5... Nc6 6. Ne4?? Nxe4! 0-1


Alexander Beliavsky (2760) - Zviad Izoria (2707) [E11]

HB Global Chess Challenge/Minneapolis (8.1) 2005


1. d4 Nf6 2. c4 e6 3. Nf3 d5 4. g3 Bb4+ 5. Bd2 Be7 6. Bg2 O-O 7. O-O c6 8. Qc2 b6 9. Rd1 Ba6 10. b3 Nbd7 11. Bf4 Rc8 12. Nc3 Qe8 13. e4 dxc4 14. h3 Bb4 15. Re1 h6 16. bxc4 Bxc4 17. a3 Be7 18. Nd2 Ba6 19. Qa4 Bd3 20. Re3 Bb5 21. Nxb5 cxb5 22. Qxa7 g5 23. Bc7 Ra8 24. Qb7 Qc8 25. Qxc8 Raxc8 26. Be5 Nxe5 27. dxe5 Nd7 28. Nf3 Rc5 29. Rb3 Nxe5 30. Nxe5 Rxe5 31. Rab1 Rd8 32. Rxb5 Rxb5 33. Rxb5 Bc5 34. Rb3 Rd2 35. Rf3 Ra2 36. Bf1 Bxa3 37. Bc4 Ra1+ 38. Kg2 Bc5 39. Rc3 Re1 40. Kf3 Kg7 41. Rc2 h5 42. Rd2 Rc1 43. Be2 Kf6 44. Kg2 h4 45. gxh4 gxh4 46. Rd7 Rc2 47. Kf1 Kg6 48. e5 Rb2 49. f4 Rb4 50. Bd3+ f5 51. exf6+ Kxf6 52. f5 exf5 53. Rh7 Rf4+ 54. Ke2 Rf2+ 55. Ke1 Rf3 56. Bf1 Kg5 57. Rh5+ Kxh5 58. Be2 Kg5 59. Bxf3 Kf4 60. Bc6 Kg3 61. Bd7 f4 0-1


Sergey Kudrin (2648) - Todd Lunna (2248) [C10]

HB Global Chess Challenge/Minneapolis (1.25) 2005


1. e4 e6 2. d4 d5 3. Nd2 dxe4 4. Nxe4 Nd7 5. g3 Be7 6. Bg2 Ngf6 7. Nxf6+ Bxf6 8. Nf3 O-O 9. O-O Rb8 10. c3 b6 11. Qa4 a5 12. Bf4 Bb7 13. Rad1 Qc8 14. Rfe1 Rd8 15. h4 Ra8 16. c4 Nf8 17. Be5 Bxe5 18. Nxe5 Bxg2 19. Kxg2 Qb7+ 20. Kg1 Ng6 21. Nc6 Re8 22. d5 Nf8 23. Qb5 exd5 24. cxd5 Kh8 25. Rxe8 Rxe8 26. Nxa5 Qc8 27. Nc4 Qg4 28. Qxe8 Qxd1+ 29. Kh2 Kg8 30. Ne5 Qxd5 31. Nc6 1-0


Pat Mazzillo - Geoff McAuliffe [B01]

2005 Kenilworth Chess Club Championship/Kenilworth, NJ USA (2) 2005


1. e4 d5 2. exd5 Qxd5 3. Nc3 Qa5 4. d4 c6 5. Nf3 Bf5 6. Bc4 e6 7. Bd2 Bb4 8. a3 Bxc3 9. Bxc3 Qc7 10. Qe2 Nf6 11. Ne5 Nbd7 12. g4!? Be4 13. O-O-O? 13. f3 Bd5 14. Bd3 Nxe5 15. dxe5 Nd7= 13... Bxh1 14. Nxf7!? White's brilliant but flawed conception is revealed. 14... Bd5? Castling wins but it is tough to spot, since it almost seems like an illegal move. But so long as the King can safely pass over f8 amd g8, castling is allowed, as even GM Auerbach once famously forgot in a major tournament game. 14... O-O! 15. Bxd5 cxd5?? Still winning is 15... O-O!-/+ 15... Nxd5 16. Qxe6+ Kf8 17. Nxh8+/- 16. Qxe6+ Kf8 17. Bb4+ 1-0


Mark Kernighan (2216) - Joe Demetrick (1474) [E61]

2005 Kenilworth Club Championship/Kenilworth, NJ USA 2005


1. d4 Nf6 2. c4 g6 3. Nc3 Bg7 4. Bg5 d6 4... c5!? 5. Nf3 O-O?! 5... h6!= 6. Qd2










6... Re8 7. Bh6 Bh8 8. h3 8. e4!+/= 8... Nbd7 9. e3 e5=










10. Be2 exd4 11. exd4 Nb6 12. O-O Bf5 13. Bd3 Qd7 14. Ng5? 14. Rae1 Bxd3 15. Qxd3 Na4 16. Nd1!+/= 14... Re7 14... d5! 15. c5 Nc4 16. Bxf5 Qxf5 17. Qc1 b6 18. b3 Na5 19. Qd2 Nc6=/+ 15. Rfe1 Rae8










16. Bxf5 Qxf5 17. b3 d5!? 18. c5 Nc8 19. Rxe7 Nxe7










20. Re1 Qd7 21. g4 Nc6 21... b6 22. Re3?! Re7 22... Ne4! 23. Ne2 Qe8 24. b4 Ne4!=/+ Diagram # 25. Nxe4 Rxe4?! 25... dxe4! 26. Rxe4?! Qxe4 27. Nc3 Qe6 28. Nb5 Qd7 29. Qe3 a6 30. Nxc7










30... Bxd4 31. Qe8+ Qxe8 32. Nxe8 Nxb4-+ and despite his pawn advantage, Black lost in time pressure...but failed to record the remainder of the game, as did his opponent. 1-0 [Joseph Demetrick]


Michael Wojcio (1623) - Joseph Demetrick (1447) [B52]

2005 Kenilworth Club Championship/Kenilworth, NJ USA 2005


1. e4 c5 2. Nf3 d6 3. Bb5+ Bd7 4. Bxd7+ Nxd7 This move is considered somewhat inaccurate since the Knight belongs at c6. Better 4... Qxd7 5. c4 This Maroczy bind method has fallen out of favor. Normally, White plays for activity by >= 5. O-O Ngf6 6. Qe2 e6 (6... g6 7. c3 Bg7 8. d4+/=) 7. b3 Be7 8. Bb2 O-O 9. c4+/= 5... Ngf6 6. Nc3 g6 A solid idea to grab the dark squares. The alternatives were 6... e6 6... Ne5!? 7. d4 cxd4 7... Bg7!? 8. Nxd4 Bg7 9. Be3 O-O 10. O-O Nc5= 10... Ne5 11. b3 (11. Qb3 Nfg4) 11... Nc6 12. Rc1+/= 11. f3 Qc8?! 11... >= Rc8 12. b3 12. Rc1+/= 12... Ne6 13. Qd2 Nxd4 14. Bxd4 Qc6 15. Rac1 Rfd8 16. Rfd1 b6 17. Bxf6 Bxf6 18. Nd5!+/- Qc5+ Black has inaccurately exchanged off his best pieces -- especially his Knights -- and now has the worse of it, especially since his Bishop has no good retreat. 19. Kh1 Kg7 20. Nxf6 Kxf6 Black's King is actually safe enough here. White might have done better to keep the Knight and build up an attack by f4 and b4, with potential pawnbreaks. 21. Qc3+ 21. Qh6 Qg5!= 21... Qe5 22. Rd4 This is an interesting maneuver, putting the Rook in front of the Queen. But a more direct attacking method was 22. Qe3 Kg7 23. f4+/= 22... Kg7 23. Qd3 Rdc8 24. Rd5 Qf4 25. Rf1 Rc7 26. g3 Qf6 27. f4 Rc5 28. e5! Qe6 29. f5? This is the right idea, but the timing is off. The simplest method was to go into a slightly better ending with 29. Rxc5 bxc5 (29... dxc5 30. Rd1+/=) 30. exd6 Qxd6 31. Qxd6 exd6 32. Rd1+/= But if he wants to try for an attack, he needs to first prepare it with 29. Qe4! Rac8 (29... dxe5?? 30. Rxc5) 30. f5! gxf5 31. Rxf5-> 29... Rxd5! 30. f6+ The best try. 30. cxd5 Qxe5=/+ 30... Kg8?! Black had a clear advantage after 30... exf6! 31. exf6+ Qxf6!! 31. cxd5? Necessary was 31. Qxd5 Qxd5+ 32. cxd5 exf6 33. exf6 Rc8 34. Re1 h5 35. h4~~ 31... Qxe5 32. fxe7 Qxe7-/+ Black is up a clear pawn, and despite the heavy pieces should have good winning chances. 33. Qc4 f5 34. Rc1 Re8 35. Rc2 Qe4+ 36. Qxe4 fxe4-/+ Black has managed to swap Queens and create a strong passed pawn, bringing him closer to victory. 37. Kg2 Kf7 38. Kf2 The alternative, to try to keep the Black king out, was 38. Rf2+ Kg7 39. Rf4 , also putting the Rook in a relatively inactive post, but Black still wins by 39... Re5 threatening to drive back the Rook by g5 40. h4 e3 41. Kf1 Rf5 simplifying things(or 41... Rxd5-+) 42. Ke2 Rxf4 43. gxf4 Kh6 44. Kxe3 Kh5-+ 38... Kf6 39. Rc7! White plays actively, creating the most trouble for his opponent. 39... h5?! Not 39... Re7? 40. Rxe7 Kxe7 41. Ke3+/= Necessary might have been 39... Ke5! 40. Rxh7 Kd4!! 41. Ke2 Rc8! 42. Kd1 Kd3 43. Re7 Rh8 44. h4 g5! which is certainly the quickest win, as Fritz points out. The King and Rook position in this variation are reminiscent of Capablanca-Tartakower, New York 1924--a game that repays careful study. 39... a5?! 40. Rxh7 Ke5 41. Rg7 Rf8+ 42. Ke2 Rf3 43. Rxg6 is similar to the game. 40. Rxa7 Ke5 41. Rb7 Kxd5! Black's choice to play a sharp ending where both sides have connected passed pawns is almost certainly correct. 41... Rc8!? 42. Rxb6 Rc2+ 43. Ke3 Rxa2 44. Rb4 Rxh2 45. Rxe4+ Kxd5-/+ leads to a difficult position from which to win. 42. Rxb6 Kc5 43. Rb7 d5 44. Rc7+? this forces the king to where it wants to go and removes the Rook from its best post to support his own pawns' advance while keeping options for checks on the Black king. Black still has a long haul after 44. Ke2! Kd4 45. Rb4+! Kc3 46. Rb6 Ra8 (46... g5 47. Rd6 Kd4 48. Ra6) 47. Ke3 Rxa2 48. Rd6 Ra5 49. Rxg6 Kxb3 50. Rc6 Ra1!-+ 44... Kd4 45. Ke2 Re6 A bit too defensive. Better 45... Ra8! 46. a4 Rb8!-+ picks off one of White's pair of passers -- another consequence of the faulty check at move 44. 46. b4? 46. Ra7! Repairs the earlier mistake. 46... Ra6! 47. Rc2 Ra4 48. Rb2 Black must now win a pawn. If 48. b5 Rb4-+ 48... Kc3!-+ 49. Rb3+ Kc4 50. Rb2 Rxb4 51. Rc2+ Kd4 52. Kd2 Rc4 53. Rb2 Rc3 54. Rb4+ Rc4 55. Rb2 e3+ 56. Ke2 Ke4 57. a3 d4 58. Rb8 Rc2+ 59. Kd1 Kd3 Or 59... d3 60. Re8+ Kf3 61. Rf8+ Kg2 62. a4 e2+ 63. Ke1 Rc1+ 64. Kd2 e1=Q+ 65. Kxd3 Qc3+-+ 60. Rb3+ Rc3 61. Rxc3+ Kxc3 Or 61... dxc3 62. a4 e2+ 63. Ke1 c2 62. a4 Kb4 A good and safe way to finish the game, especially if the clock is ticking down. But Black could have played for style points with 62... Kd3! 63. a5 (White can only avoid what follows by 63. Ke1 e2 64. Kf2 Kd2-+) 63... e2+ 64. Ke1 Ke3 65. a6 d3 66. a7 d2# 0-1


J. Demetrick (1473) - S. Massey (2221) [B00]

2005 Kenilworth Club Championship/Kenilworth, NJ USA 2005


1. e4 Nc6 2. Nf3 d6 3. d4 Nf6 4. Nc3 Bg4 5. Be2 e6 6. O-O Be7 7. a3?! This seems to have little to do with the position. In a later game, Joe played 7. Be3 d5= Best was 7. d5! exd5 8. exd5 Bxf3 (8... Ne5? 9. Nxe5+/-) (8... Nb8 9. Nd4+/=) 9. Bxf3 Ne5 10. Be2!+/= 7... O-O 8. b4 A logical follow-up to the previous move, but now the light squares become weak. 8... d5 9. exd5 9. e5 Ne4!= 9... exd5 10. Ne5 Bxe2 11. Nxc6!? 11. Nxe2 Re8 12. b5 Nxe5 13. dxe5 Ne4= 11... Bxd1 12. Nxd8 Rfxd8! 13. Rxd1 h6 14. Bf4 c6 15. Re1 Re8 The position looks completely equal, but looks can be deceiving. Scott retains a slight plus due to White's weak light squares, his potentially over-extended Queenside, and his worse Bishop (since White's pawns are on dark). 16. Re2 Bf8! Best to swap the Rooks before attacking the Queenside. 17. Rae1 Rxe2! 18. Rxe2 Necessary was 18. Nxe2 a5! 19. c3 Ne4 (19... axb4 20. axb4 Ne4 21. f3 Nd6 22. Bxd6 Bxd6 23. g3 Ra3) 20. f3 Nd6 21. Bxd6 Bxd6 22. g3 Kf8 23. Kf2 b6 24. h3 axb4 25. axb4=/+ though Black still has an edge. 18... a5!-/+ This move wins a pawn. 19. b5 Bxa3 20. bxc6 bxc6 21. Na4 Ra7 22. Re1 Ne4 23. Ra1 Bb4 24. f3 Nc3 25. Nc5?? A blunder, but Black was winning even against best play: 25. Kf2 Nxa4 26. Rxa4 Re7!-/+ 25... Ne2+! Forking King and Bishop to win a piece. 26. Kf2 Nxf4 27. g3 Bxc5 28. dxc5 Ne6 29. Ke3 a4 30. Ra3 Kf8 31. Kd3 Ke7 32. Kc3 Nxc5 33. Kb4 Kd6 34. f4 d4 35. Kc4 Ne6 36. Kb4 c5+ 37. Kc4 f5 38. Kd3 Kd5 39. c4+ dxc3 40. Kxc3 Nd4 41. Kd2 c4 42. Kd1 Nb5 43. Ra1 c3 44. Kc2 Kc4 45. Kc1 a3 46. Kc2 Nd4+ 0-1


Geoff McAuliffe - Joe Demetrick [B22]

2005 Kenilworth Club Championship/Kenilworth, NJ USA 2005


1. e4 c5 2. c3 Nf6 3. e5 Nd5 4. d4 cxd4 5. cxd4 d6 6. Nf3 Nc6 7. a3 dxe5 8. dxe5 e6 9. Bd3 Qc7 10. Qe2? 10. O-O Bd7 11. Re1= 10... Bd7? Mutual blindness occurs twice in this game. Black misses a winning shot: 10... Nd4!! 11. Qd1 (11. Nxd4 Qxc1+ 12. Qd1 Qxb2-+) 11... Nxf3+ 12. gxf3 Qxe5+-+ with an extra pawn and the better game as well. 11. O-O Be7 12. Bd2 O-O 13. Nc3 Nxc3 14. Bxc3+/= Na5? 15. Bxa5 Qxa5 16. Qe4 Winning a pawn, but stronger is 16. Bxh7+! Kxh7 17. Qd3+ Kg8 18. Qxd7+- which wins a pawn with the better position. 16... g6 17. Qxb7 Qd5!? 18. Qxd5 exd5 19. Rac1 Rfc8 20. b4 Bf8 21. Nd4 White can win the battle for the c-file with 21. Ba6! 21... Bh6! Gaining the c-file and provoking White's next move. 22. f4? White is still much better after 22. Rxc8+ Rxc8 23. f4+/- 22... Rxc1 23. Rxc1 Bxf4 24. Rc7 Ba4 25. Nf3= 1/2-1/2


Joe Wojcio - Joe Demetrick (1474) [B20]

2005 Kenilworth Club Championship/Kenilworth, NJ USA 2005


1. e4 c5 2. c4!? This is actually a fairly respectable system, which is especially good for younger players to try as a way of reaching middlegames without having to know a lot of theory. Though White surrenders the dark squares, he gains a grip on the light. 2... Nc6 3. Nf3 d6 4. b3 More typical is development by g3, Bg2, d3, Nc3 and Be3. 4... Nf6 5. Nc3 e6 More logical are 5... g6 and 5... Bg4 to control the dark squares more firmly. 6. Be2 Be7 7. O-O O-O 8. d3 d5 9. exd5 exd5 10. cxd5 Nxd5 11. Nxd5 Qxd5=/+ Now White simply has weak dark squares and a weak and backward d-pawn. 12. Ba3 Bf6! 13. Rc1 b6 14. Rc2 Bf5 Putting pressure on d3. A good alternative is 14... Bb7! and the long diagonal is bound to cause White trouble. 15. Bb2 Bxb2 16. Rxb2 Rad8 Piling on d3. 17. Rd2 Rfe8 18. Nh4 Nd4 19. Nxf5 Qxf5 20. Bg4 Qe5 21. h3 g6 White is under a lot of pressure but defending as best he can--until the following move: 22. f3?? Qe3+! 23. Rdf2 h5 Black snags the Bishop. 24. Qd2 Qxd2 25. Rxd2 hxg4 26. hxg4 Re2 27. Rxe2 Nxe2+ 28. Kh2 Rxd3 28... Kg7! 29. g3[] Rxd3 29. f4 Kg7 30. f5 f6 31. Re1 Re3 32. g3 Kh6 33. Kh3 Rxg3+?! 33... Nf4+!-+ 34. Kh4? 34. Kh2 Re3-+ 34... g5# 0-1 [Joseph Demetrick]


Steve Stoyko (2312) - Joe Demetrick (1454) [D26]

2005 Kenilworth Chess Club Championship/Kenilworth, NJ USA 2005


1. Nf3 d5 2. d4 Nf6 3. c4 dxc4 4. e3 Bf5?+/= a mistake.. 4... Bg4 5. Bxc4 e6 6. h3 Bh5 7. Nc3 Nbd7 8. O-O Bd6= 4... e6 5. Bxc4 c5 6. O-O= 5. Bxc4 e6 5... Ne4!? 6. Nbd2 Nd6!? 6. Qb3 Be4? Compounding the previous mistake. Black probably shouldn't sacrifice the pawn with 6... Nbd7!? 7. Qxb7 c5 (7... Be4 8. Qb3 Fritz 7: 8... Bxf3 9. gxf3 c5 10. dxc5 Bxc5 11. Rg1 Rb8 12. Qd3 Ne5 13. Qxd8+ Rxd8 14. Bb5+ Ke7 15. Ke2+/=) Relatively best is 6... b6 7. Nbd2 c5 8. Nh4!?+/= 7. Nc3 Bc6 Black has already made 3 moves with the light-squared Bishop - just so that it can be traded off... Not a good opening sign.. 8. Ne5! Be7 9. Nxc6 bxc6 10. Qb7 Nbd7 11. Qxc6 O-O 12. O-O Nb6 13. Bb3 Qd6 trying to reconnect the pawns.. 14. Qxd6 cxd6 15. Bd2 d5 Steve said that this was a definitive mistake for Black, and that Black should try for counterplay... 15... Rab8! 16. Rfc1 Rfc8 17. f3 takes away squares from the knight 17... Nfd7 18. Ne2 Kf8 19. Rxc8+ Rxc8 20. Rc1 Nc4 21. Bxc4 dxc4 22. b3 Nb6 23. Ba5 cxb3 24. Rxc8+ Nxc8 25. axb3 Nb6 25... Bd6 26. Nc3 Ne7 27. Nb5 Bb8 28. Bc7 Bxc7 29. Nxc7+/- 26. e4 Ke8 27. Kf2 Kd7 28. Ke3 Kc6 29. Nc3 Bd6 30. h3 f6 not a good plan as Black puts the pawns on the dark squares 31. Kd3 g5?? 32. g4 fixes the weakness 32... h6 33. Bxb6 now the Bishop is worth eliminating the Knight - Black's last source for counterplay.. 33... Kxb6 34. Kc4 a6 35. d5 e5 36. b4 Kc7 37. Na4 1-0


Joe Demetrick - Pat Mazzillo [C42]

2005 Kenilworth Chess Club Championship/Kenilworth, NJ USA 2005


1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 Nf6 3. Nxe5 Nxe4?! 4. Nc3!? The book move is 4. Qe2+/= 4... Nxc3 5. dxc3 Bc5 5... Qe7 6. Qe2 d6 7. Nf3 Qxe2+ 8. Bxe2 Nc6= 6. Bc4 O-O 7. O-O d6 8. Nf3 Bg4 9. h3 Bh5+/= 9... Bd7 10. Bg5 Qc8 11. Re1+/= 10. Qd5 Bxf3 11. Qxf3 Nc6 12. Bd3 d5 13. Qh5 g6 14. Qh6 Qf6 14... Be7 15. Bg5 Qg7 16. Qh4 Qe5 17. Rae1 Qd6 18. b4 Bb6 19. b5 Ne5??+- loses the Knight 19... f6 20. Bh6 Ne5 21. Bxf8 Rxf8+/- loses the exchange, but has counterplay.. 20. Be7 Qe6 21. Bf6 Nf3+ 22. gxf3 1-0 [Joe Demetrick]


Ted Mann - Joe Demetrick [B22]

2005 Kenilworth Chess Club Championship/Kenilworth, NJ USA 2005


1. e4 c5 2. c3 Nf6 3. e5 Nd5 4. d4 cxd4 5. cxd4 Nc6 6. Nf3 d6 7. Bc4 Nb6 8. Bxf7+? Typical of Ted's disdain for material over attack. See his game against Kernighan for an even more dramatic example. Here the sacrifice is simply unsound, though it takes a lot of proving. 8... Kxf7 9. Ng5+ Or 9. e6+!? Bxe6 (9... Kg8 10. d5) 10. Ng5+ Kf6 11. Nxe6 Kxe6 12. d5+ Nxd5 13. Qg4+ Kf7 14. Qh5+ g6 15. Qxd5+ e6 16. Qb3 9... Kg8 10. Qf3 Qe8 11. e6 g6 12. d5 Ne5 12... Nb4!-+ 13. Qe4 Qb5 14. Nc3 Qd3 15. Qf4 Qxc3+! Simplifying the position for an easy win. 16. Kd1!? Giving up a second piece is typical of Ted's style. 16. bxc3 Nd3+ 17. Ke2 Nxf4+ 18. Bxf4 Nxd5-+ 16... Qd3+ 17. Bd2 Nxd5 18. Qa4 Nf6-+ 18... Nc4 19. Ke1 Qxd2+ 20. Kf1 Nce3+ 21. Kg1 19. Rc1 Bxe6 20. Nxe6 Bh6 21. f4 Ne4 22. Qc2 Nf2+ 23. Ke1 Qxc2 24. Rxc2 Ned3+ 25. Ke2 Nxh1 26. Kxd3 Nf2+ 27. Ke2 Ne4 28. Bb4 Kf7 29. Nd4 Rhc8 30. Rxc8 Rxc8 31. g3 Bg7 32. Ke3 Bxd4+ 33. Kxd4 Nf6 34. h4 h5 35. a4 Rc2 36. Bc3 Rg2 37. Be1 Rxb2 0-1 [Joseph Demetrick]


Steve Stoyko - Ari Minkov [D46]

Kenilworth Chess Club Simultaneous Exhibition/Kenilworth, NJ USA 2005


1. d4 d5 2. Nf3 Nf6 3. c4 c6 4. Nbd2 e6 5. e3 Bd6 6. Bd3 Nbd7 7. O-O O-O 8. b3 e5 9. cxd5 Nxd5?! 10. Bb2?! 10. dxe5! Nxe5 11. Nxe5 Bxe5 12. Bxh7+ Kxh7 13. Qh5+ Kg8 14. Qxe5+/- 10. Nc4!?+/= 10... Qe7?! 11. Ne4?! 11. dxe5! Nxe5 12. Nxe5 Bxe5 13. Bxh7+! 11... Bc7 12. Re1?? f5 13. dxe5 fxe4 14. Bxe4 N5b6 15. Qc2 h6 16. Qc3 Qc5 17. Qxc5 Nxc5 18. Bc2 Bf5 19. e4 Bg4 20. Ba3 Nbd7 21. Nd4? 21. e6 21... Bxe5-+ 0-1


Steve Stoyko - Richard Lewis [D91]

Kenilworth Chess Club Simultaneous Exhibition/Kenilworth, NJ USA 2005


1. c4 Nf6 2. Nf3 g6 3. Nc3 Bg7 4. d4 d5 5. Bg5 Ne4 6. Bh4 Nxc3 7. bxc3 c5 8. cxd5 8. e3 Nc6= 8... Qxd5 8... cxd4 9. cxd4 Qxd5 9. e3 cxd4 10. cxd4 Nc6 11. Be2 11. Qb3 11... O-O 12. O-O Be6 13. Qa4 >= 13. Qb1!? Qd7 14. Rd1+/= 13... a6 14. Rfc1 b5 15. Qa3 Rfe8 15... Qd7= 16. Rc5 16. Ng5! Qd7 17. Nxe6 fxe6 (17... Qxe6 18. Bf3 Rac8 19. d5+-) 18. Bf3 Rac8 19. Qxa6+- 16... Qd7 17. Rac1 b4!? 17... Rec8 18. d5 Bxd5 19. Rd1 e6 20. e4 Bf8 21. exd5 exd5 22. Qe3 Bxc5 23. Qxc5+/- 18. Qa4? 18. Qd3 Nd8 19. Rc7+/- 18... Nxd4!! 19. Qd1 Nxe2+ 20. Qxe2 a5 21. Rc7 Qd5 22. Ng5 Qxa2 23. R1c2 Qa1+ 24. Rc1 Qb2 25. R1c2 Qe5 26. Nxe6 Qxe6-+ 0-1 [Michael Goeller]


Steve Stoyko - Mark Kernighan [B51]

Kenilworth Chess Club Simultaneous Exhibition/Kenilworth, NJ USA 2005


1. e4 c5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. Bb5 d6 4. Bxc6+ bxc6 5. O-O e5 6. c3 Nf6 7. Re1 Be7 8. d4 cxd4 9. cxd4 Qc7 10. Na3!? O-O 11. Nc4 Be6 12. b3 12. dxe5! Bxc4 13. exf6 Bxf6 14. Qc2 (14. Bf4!?) 14... Be6 15. Bg5+/= 12... exd4 12... Nxe4!? 13. Rxe4 d5 14. Rxe5 dxc4 15. Ng5 Bxg5 16. Bxg5 Qd7= 13. Nxd4 13. Qxd4 d5 14. exd5 cxd5 15. Bf4 Qc5= 13... d5 14. exd5 Bxd5 15. Ne3 15. Nf5!? Bb4 (15... Bc5 16. Be3 Bb4 17. Bd2) 16. Bd2= (16. Bb2? Bxe1 (16... Qf4-/+) 17. Bxf6 Bxf2+!-+) 15... Rad8 16. Bb2 Be4 17. Qe2 Rfe8 18. Qc4 Bd6=/+ 19. g3 Be5 19... Qb6!|^ 20. Rad1 20. f4?! Bd6 21. Ndf5 Bxf5 22. Nxf5 Rxe1+ 23. Rxe1 Qa5!-/+ 20... Qc8? 20... Qb6!=/+ 21. f3? 21. Nxc6! Rxd1 (21... Bxc6 22. Rxd8+/-) 22. Nxd1 Bxc6 23. Rxe5 Rxe5 24. Bxe5+/= 21... Bxf3 22. Nxf3 Bxb2 23. Rxd8 Qxd8!? 24. Rd1?? 24. Qxc6 Bd4 25. Nxd4 Qxd4 26. Qc4 Qb6=/+ 24... Qb6!-+ 0-1


Steve Stoyko - Michael Goeller [A28]

Kenilworth Chess Club Simultaneous Exhibition/Kenilworth, NJ 2005


1. c4 Nc6 2. Nc3 Nf6 3. Nf3 e5 4. d3 Bb4 5. g3 Bxc3+!? 6. bxc3 d6 7. Bg2 Bd7 7... e4!? 8. O-O O-O 9. Rb1 b6 10. e4 Ne8 11. Ne1 11. Nh4 11... f5?! 12. exf5! 12. f4 fxe4= 12... Rxf5 13. f4 Rc8 13... exf4 14. Bxf4+/- 13... >= Rb8 14. g4?! >= 14. Nc2+/- with the idea of Ne3-d5 14... Rf8 15. f5 Ne7! 16. Bg5 Nf6 17. h3 17. Bh4!? 17... h6 17... >= Qe8 18. d4 Bc6 18. Bh4 g5 19. Bg3 19. fxg6 Nxg6 20. Bg3 Qe7 21. Rb2+/= 19... Kg7? 19... Bc6! 20. d4 Bxg2 21. Nxg2 exd4 22. cxd4 d5= makes Black's Rc8 look reasonable. 20. Nc2 20. d4!+/- 20... h5?! 20... Bc6!+/= 21. Ne3?! >= 21. Qd2 Nh7 22. d4+/- 21... hxg4 21... h4? 22. Bxh4!? (22. Bh2 Bc6 23. d4+/=) 22... gxh4 23. g5!-> 22. hxg4 c6?! 22... Bc6! 23. d4! Qc7 24. c5! bxc5 25. dxe5 dxe5 26. Nc4 Ned5 27. Bxe5 Qd8 28. Nd6?! 28. Qd2! Nf4 29. Rb7+- 28... Ne3? upon playing this move I said "Don't worry, I'll resign soon." It looked bad, though I did not see the mate: 29. Bxf6+? 29. Qd2!+- Nexg4 30. Qxg5+ Kh8 31. Qh5+ Kg7 32. Qg6+ Kh8 33. Rf3 forces mate. 29... Qxf6 30. Qd3?! Now the position slips into an ending where White has a distinct edge based on Black's doubled c-pawns and more exposed King, but no clear win. 30. Ne4! Qe7 31. Qd2 Nxf1 32. Rxf1-> 30... Nxf1 31. Nxc8 Bxc8 32. Rxf1 Rd8 33. Qf3+/= White still has a clear edge, but the win would require more attention on Steve's part than he likely could devote here. So he offered me a draw, which I grabbed in an instant. 1/2-1/2


Steve Stoyko - Paul Corcoran [C14]

Kenilworth Chess Club Simultaneous Exhibition/Kenilworth, NJ 2005


1. e4 e6 2. d4 d5 3. Nc3 Nf6 4. Bg5 Be7 5. e5 Nfd7 6. Bxe7 Qxe7 7. Qd2 O-O 8. O-O-O c5 9. f4 Nc6 10. Nf3 a6 11. Bd3?! 11. dxc5 11... f5 11... c4! 12. exf6 Nxf6 13. dxc5 Qxc5 14. Rde1 Bd7 15. Ne5 Rfe8 16. Kb1 b5 17. Ne2!? Rac8 17... Nxe5 18. fxe5 Ng4 19. Nd4+/= 18. c3 a5?! 18... >= b4 19. cxb4 Qxb4 20. Qxb4 Nxb4= 19. Nd4! Nxd4 20. cxd4 Qb6 21. g4 Re7 22. g5 Ne8 23. Re3 23. f5! exf5 24. Nxd7 Rxd7 25. Bxf5+- 23... g6 24. Be2 Ng7 25. Bg4 Nf5 26. Bxf5 exf5 27. Rd1 27. h4-> 27... Rf8 28. h4 28. Nxg6! 28... Kg7 29. h5 Qd8 30. h6+!? 30. hxg6 hxg6 31. Qh2 Rh8 32. Rh3+- 30... Kg8 31. Rc1 Re6 32. Rec3 b4 33. Rc7 Rd6 34. Qc2 Be8 35. Qc5+- 35. Rg7+ Kh8 36. Qc7 forces mate more quickly, but the text led to the same result: immediate resignation. 1-0


Steve Stoyko - Greg Tomkovich [B52]

Kenilworth Chess Club Simultaneous Exhibition/Kenilworth, NJ 2005


1. e4 c5 2. Nf3 d6 3. Bb5+ Bd7 4. a4 g6 I have never seen a4 in this position before, I didn't want to open the a-file for the rook, so I just ignored the bishop and continued with the Dragon formation. 4... Nc6!? 5. O-O Nf6 5. O-O Bg7 6. Re1 Nf6 7. c3 O-O 8. h3 Nc6 9. d4 cxd4 10. cxd4 Rc8 11. Nc3 Nb4?! Here I start overextending on the Queen side and get into a bit of trouble. 11... a6 12. Bf1 e5!? 13. Be3 (13. d5 Na5=) 13... exd4 14. Nxd4 Re8~~ 12. d5 a6 13. Bf1 Qa5? Too aggressive, the Queen almost ends up getting trapped here. 14. Be3 14. Bd2! Qc7 15. a5+/- 14... Rc7? 14... Nxe4?! 15. Nxe4 Nc2 16. Bd2 Qc7 17. Bc3+/- 14... e6!? 15. dxe6 Bxe6~/= 15. Nd4?! 15. Bd2! Qc5 16. a5+- and Black's Queen and Knight are in serious trouble. 15... Rcc8 The threat was Nb3 trapping the Queen. 16. Nb3 Qc7 17. a5 e6 18. Bb6 Qb8 19. Nd4 exd5 20. Qb3 Nc6 21. exd5 Nxd4 22. Bxd4 Rfe8 23. Bb6 Rxe1 24. Rxe1 Re8 25. Rd1 Qc8?! 25... Ne4!? 25... Bf5!? 26. Qb4 Bf8 27. Qf4 Nh5 28. Qd2 28. Qf3! 28... Ng7?! 28... Bg7 29. g4 Bxg4? A move I MUST play good or bad. I have a reputation to keep up! I'd rather go down fighting than be slowly crushed to death. 30. hxg4 Qxg4+ 31. Bg2 Re5 31... Nf5 32. Qd4 Qh5 33. Ne4! Kh8 Avoiding the fork on f6 34. f4 Nf5 35. Qd2 Bh6 36. Rc1 Qg4?? 36... Qh4 37. Rc8+ Kg7 38. Rg8+!! Kxg8 39. Nf6+ 1-0 [Tomkovich]


Steve Stoyko - Joe Demetrick [B08]

Kenilworth Chess Club Simultaneous Exhibition/Kenilworth, NJ USA 2005


1. d4 Nf6 2. Nf3 g6 3. Nc3 Bg7 3... d5 4. Bf4 Bg7 4. e4 d6 5. Be3 O-O 6. h3 Nbd7 6... c6 7. a4 a5 7. Qd2 e5 8. O-O-O Re8 9. d5 b6 10. Bh6 Bh8 11. g4 Nc5 12. Bd3 Ba6 13. Bxa6 Nxa6 14. Nh2 Qd7 15. f3 Nc5 16. h4 b5 17. h5 b4 18. Ne2 Qa4 19. Kb1 Rab8 20. Nf1 b3 21. cxb3 Nxb3? 22. axb3 Rxb3 23. Nc1?! 23. Qc2 23... Rxf3 24. hxg6 Qxe4+ 25. Qc2 fxg6? Fritz 7: 25... hxg6 26. g5 Rf2 27. Qxe4 Nxe4 28. Nd3 f5 29. gxf6 Rf3 30. Re1 Nxf6 0.59/10 26. Qxe4 Nxe4 27. Nd2 Nxd2+ 28. Rxd2 Rg3 29. g5 Rf3 Fritz 7: 29... Bg7 30. Ne2 Rg2 31. Bxg7 Nxd2+ 31... Kxg7 32. Rc2 Re7 33. Nd4 Rxc2 34. Nxc2 c6 35. Ne3 cxd5 36. Nxd5 Rf7 0.97/14 30. Ne2 Rb8 31. Rc1 Rb7 32. Nc3 Bg7 33. Ne4 Bxh6 34. gxh6 Rf4 35. Ng5 Rh4 36. Ne6 Kf7 37. Rf2+ Ke7 38. Rcf1 1-0 [Joseph Demetrick]


Steve Stoyko (2286) - Ed Selling (1658) [B30]

Kenilworth Chess Club Simultaneous Exhibition/Kenilworth, NJ USA 2005


1. e4 c5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. Bb5 e6 4. Bxc6 dxc6 5. O-O Qc7 6. d3 Nf6 7. Qe2 Be7 8. Nbd2 e5 9. h3 O-O 10. Nc4 Nd7 10... b5?! 11. Ncxe5 Bd6 12. d4 cxd4 13. Nd3+/- 11. a4 b5 12. Ne3 Nf6 13. Nh4 xf5 13... Nxe4!? 14. Nhf5!? 14. dxe4 Bxh4 15. axb5 cxb5 16. Qxb5+/= 14... Nf6 15. axb5 15. Qf3! Bb7 (15... Rb8? 16. Qxc6!) 16. Nxe7+ Qxe7 17. Nf5 Qe6 18. axb5+/= 15... cxb5 16. Nxe7+ Qxe7 17. Bd2 Be6 18. Ra6 h6 19. Rfa1 Rfc8 20. Qf3 White has more than sufficient compensation for the pawn. 20... c4 21. Bc3 cxd3 22. cxd3 e4?! 23. dxe4 23. Bxf6 Qxf6 24. Qxf6 gxf6 25. dxe4 Rc7 26. g4+/- 23... b4 24. Bxf6 Qxf6 25. Qxf6 gxf6 26. Rxa7 Rxa7 27. Rxa7 Rc1+ 28. Kh2 Rb1 29. Nd5 Kg7 29... >= Rxb2 30. Nxf6+ Kg7 31. Nh5+ Kf8 32. Nf4~~ 30. Rb7 Rxb2 31. Rxb4 Rxf2 32. Kg3 Rd2 33. Nf4 Bd7 34. Rb6 Rd4 35. Nh5+ Kg6 36. Rxf6+? 36. Nxf6+/- 36... Kxh5? 36... Kg5! 37. Rxf7 Kxh5 38. Kf4 Kg6 39. Re7 Rd1=/+ 37. Kf4 Bxh3! 38. gxh3 Rd7 39. Rb6 Re7 39... Rd3 40. Kf5 Rc7 41. e5 Rc1 42. Rb4 Rf1+ 43. Rf4 Rxf4+ 44. Kxf4 Kg6?! 44... Kh4! 45. Kf5 Kxh3 46. Kf6 h5 47. Kxf7 h4 48. e6 Kg2 49. e7 h3 50. e8=Q h2 51. Qa8+ Kg1 52. Qa7+ Kf1 53. Qa6+ Kf2= 45. h4 f5? 45... Kh7!!= 46. h5+ Kf7 47. Kxf5 Kg7 48. e6 1-0


Steve Stoyko - Michael Wojcio [A44]

Kenilworth Chess Club Simultaneous Exhibition/Kenilworth, NJ USA 2005


1. d4 c5 2. d5 e5 3. e4 Nf6 4. Nc3 d6 5. Nf3 Be7 6. Be2 O-O 7. O-O Nbd7 8. a4 Re8 9. Re1 Nf8 10. Nd2 Bd7 11. Nc4 Ng6 12. g3 a6 13. a5 Bh3 14. Bf1 Bxf1 15. Rxf1 Nd7 16. f4 exf4 17. gxf4 b5 18. axb6 Nxb6 19. Na5 Bf6 20. Nc6 Qd7 21. Qf3 Nc8 22. Bd2 Nce7 23. Na5 23. Na4 Nh4 24. Qg3 Neg6 23... Nh4 24. Qg3 Neg6 25. Rae1 Bd4+ 26. Kh1 f5 27. Nc4 fxe4? 28. Nxe4 Nf5 29. Qh3 Nge7 30. c3 Bf6 31. Nxf6+ gxf6 32. Re6 32. Rg1+ 32... Ng7 33. Qg2 Nef5 34. Rxf6 34. Nb6 34... Qb5 35. Rxf5 Qxc4 36. Rg1 Qe4 37. Qxe4 Rxe4 38. Rfg5 Ra7 39. f5 Re5 40. f6 1-0


Steve Stoyko - Pete Cavaliere [D52]

Kenilworth Chess Club Simultaneous Exhibition/Kenilworth, NJ USA 2005


1. d4 d5 2. c4 e6 3. Nc3 Nf6 4. Bg5 Nbd7 5. Nf3 c6 6. e3 Qa5 7. a3?! This move actually does not inhibit Black's counterplay along the a5-e1 diagonal. More common is 7. Nd2 Bb4 8. Qc2+/= 7... Ne4! 8. cxd5 There are lots of tactics in the air along the a5-e1 diagonal: 8. Rc1 Nxc3 (8... Bxa3? 9. bxa3 Nxc3 10. Qd2+-) 9. Qd2 (9. Rxc3? Bxa3!-/+) 9... dxc4= 8... Nxg5?! Black should win a pawn by 8... Nxc3 9. Qd2 Bb4 10. Rc1 Nxd5 (10... Qxd5 11. bxc3 (11. axb4?! Ne4=/+) 11... Bxa3 12. Rd1~/= and White has some compensation) 11. axb4 Qxb4 12. e4 Qxd2+ 13. Kxd2~/= Nb4 and White has nothing concrete to show for his pawn, though he does have positional compensation in the form of the two Bishops and Black's weak dark squares. Also good is 8... exd5 and White is hard pressed to meet Black's counterplay: 9. Qb3 (9. Qc2?! Bb4=/+) (9. Rc1 f6! (9... Nxc3 10. Qd2=) 10. Bf4 g5 11. Bg3 h5) 9... f6 10. Bf4 g5 11. Bg3 h5=/+ 9. Nxg5 exd5 10. Bd3 10. Qh5!? g6 11. Qf3 f6 12. Ne6 Be7 13. Nf4+/= 10... h6?! 11. Nf3?! White wins quickly after 11. Qh5! g6 12. Bxg6!-> 11... Nf6 12. O-O Bg4 13. h3 Bxf3 14. Qxf3+/= Qc7 15. e4 dxe4 16. Nxe4 Nd5 16... Nxe4 17. Qxe4+ Be7 18. Rfe1+/- 17. Nc3!? O-O-O 18. Rac1 Better is 18. Nxd5! Rxd5 19. Rad1 g6 20. b4 Bg7 21. b5! Rxd4 22. bxc6 bxc6 23. Ba6+ with good winning chances due to the threats against Black's King. Now Black equalizes: 18... Qf4!= 19. Qd1 Kb8 20. Nxd5 Rxd5 21. Rc4 Qd6? Black has to take the pawn and ask what White has got in compensation. 21... Rxd4 22. Be4! Rb5 23. b4 Qf4?! 23... g6 24. Bf3 24. d5! cxd5 25. Bxd5 Qf6 26. Bxf7!+/- and Black can't take the Bishop due to the back-rank mate. 24... Bd6 25. g3 Rg5 26. Bg2 Rxg3?? Pete has a mild hallucination. 26... Qf5 27. a4 Re8 28. b5|^ gives White the much better attacking chances in a position sharpened by the presence of opposite-colored Bishops. 27. fxg3 Qe3+ 28. Rf2! Pete must have forgotten about the interposition of the Rook. He probably only examined 28. Kh1? Qxg3 29. Kg1 Qh2+ 30. Kf2 Bg3+ 31. Ke3 (31. Kf3 Bh4!->) 31... Qxg2~/= or 28. Kh2? Qxg3+ 29. Kg1 Qh2+ 30. Kf2 Bg3+ 31. Ke3 Qxg2~/= 28... Bxg3 29. Qf3+- and Black is down a piece for two pawns in an easy ending after 29...Bxf2+ 30.Qxf2. 1-0 [Michael Goeller]

Game(s) in PGN