Yaacov in Vegas

SM Yaacov Norowitz played some interesting games at the North American Open in Las Vegas. I have annotated three of his better ones, including two where he turned a difficult game into a draw by forcing perpetual check.

Yaacov Norowitz - Ilya Smirin [E60]

20TH ANNUAL NORTH AMERICAN OPEN/Las Vegas (3) 2010


1. d4 Nf6 2. Nf3 g6 3. e3 Bg7 4. Be2 O-O 5. b3 d6 6. Bb2

Norowitz's favorite Anti-KID set-up, which places the Bishop at b2 to oppose the Bishop on g7, with the hope of eventually trading off that important kingside defender.

 

6... Nc6 7. O-O e5 8. dxe5 Ng4

This is Black's typical tactic, using the pin along the long diagonal to easily recover the pawn.

 

9. c4 dxe5!?

Perhaps Black's idea is to close up the long diagonal as quickly as possible. The more typical equalizer is 9... Ncxe5 to encourage some exchanging of minor pieces.

 

10. h3 Nh6 11. Qc1 e4

This advance seems very compliant in allowing the exchange of Bishops. but it is hard to see how Black otherwise gets play against White's simple plan of Rd1 and Nd5. Black now builds up a strong attacking position behind his spearhead pawn.

 

12. Bxg7 Kxg7 13. Qb2+ Kg8 14. Nfd2 f5 15. Rd1 Qe7 16. Nc3 Ne5 17. c5!?

Trying for more than 17. Nd5 Qg7 18. Qa3 Be6 (18... c6? 19. Nb6!) 19. Nf4

 

17... c6!?

Taking control of d5 but ceding d6.

17... Qxc5 18. Nc4 Be6 19. Nxe4 fxe4 20. Nxe5

17... Qg7 18. Nc4 Be6 19. Nb5

 

18. b4 Nhf7 19. Nc4 Qf6

19... Nxc4 20. Bxc4 Be6 21. Bxe6 Qxe6 22. Ne2! Ne5 23. Nf4 Qf6 24. Qb3+ Qf7 25. Ne6 Rfc8 (25... Rfe8 26. Nc7) 26. Rd6 and White controls more critical squares.

 

20. Rd2

20. Nxe5 Nxe5 21. Rd6 is also good.

 

20... Be6 21. Nxe5 Qxe5 22. Rad1 Rae8 23. Bf1 f4 24. exf4 Qxf4 25. Rd4 Ng5

Black suddenly has a strong kingside initiative and a sac at h3 or f3 seems in the offing.

 

26. Qd2 Qh4 27. Qe3

 










27... Bxh3 28. Re1 Rf4 29. Ne2 Rg4 30. Ng3 Rf8 31. gxh3 Nf3+ 32. Kh1 Rff4 33. Rdd1 Rxg3 34. fxg3 Qxg3 35. Re2

35. Rd8+ Kf7 36. Re2 Rh4 would transpose.

 

35... Rh4

Black's deadly threats force White to find a nice drawing continuation.

 

36. Rd8+

36. Qb3+ transposes

 

36... Kf7

36... Kg7? 37. Qc3+ Kh6 38. Qe3+ g5 (38... Kg7 39. Qc3+=) 39. Qf2 Rxh3+ 40. Bxh3 Qxh3+ 41. Qh2! Nxh2 42. Rxh2

 

37. Qb3+ Ke7










37... Kf6? 38. Rf8+ Kg5 39. Qe3+ Kh5 40. Qf2 Rxh3+ 41. Bxh3 Qxh3+ 42. Qh2!

38. Rd7+! Kxd7 39. Qf7+ Kd8 40. Qf8+ 1/2-1/2


Alex Barnett - Yaacov Norowitz [B12]

20TH ANNUAL NORTH AMERICAN OPEN/Las Vegas (4) 2010


1. e4 c6 2. d4 d5 3. e5 Bf5 4. Nf3 e6 5. Be2 Ne7 6. O-O Nd7 7. b3 a6 8. c4 c5 9. Bb2 dxc4 10. bxc4 cxd4 11. Nxd4 Bg6 12. Qa4 Qb6 13. Bc3 Nc6 14. Nxc6 Nc5! 15. Qd1 Qxc6










Black has emerged from the opening with a clear advantage due to his well placed pieces, control of light squares, and superior pawn structure.

 

16. Nd2 Be7

16... Rd8

 

17. Bf3 Qc7 18. Bh5?! O-O! 19. Bxg6

 










19... fxg6!

One of those rare cases where it's better to break up your pawn chains and capture away from the center in order to open up a useful file which will help to mobilize his Rook for attack on the e-pawn.

 

20. Qg4

20. Qe2 Rf5=

 

20... Rf5! 21. Nf3 Raf8 22. Nd4 Rxe5 23. Rae1 Rxe1 24. Rxe1 Qf4 25. Qxf4 Rxf4 26. g3 Re4 27. Rd1 Kf7 28. Kg2 Bf6 29. f4 Re3 30. Bb4 Nd3 31. Nc2 Re2+ 32. Kf3 Rxc2 33. Rxd3 Ke8 34. Rd6 Rxa2 35. Rb6 Rb2 36. c5 a5 37. Bxa5 Rxb6 38. Bxb6 g5 39. fxg5 Bxg5 40. Ke4 Bd8 41. Ba7 Bc7

Diagram # Black's pawn is bound to tell in the end, so White calls it a day.

0-1

Yaacov Norowitz - Siddharth Ravichandran [D02]

20TH ANNUAL NORTH AMERICAN OPEN/Las Vegas (5) 2010


1. d4 d5 2. Nf3 Nf6 3. c3!?

A Reversed Slav, which is the sort of thing that is typical of Yaacov's quiet opening play.

 

3... Bf5 4. Qb3 Qc8 5. Bg5 Nbd7

5... Ne4? 6. Qxd5

 

6. Nbd2 h6 7. Bh4 e6 8. e3 Bd6 9. Be2 Ne4










10. O-O?!

White cannot leave the Knight at e4 indefinitely without handing Black the initiative. Necessary was 10. Nxe4 Bxe4 11. Nd2! Bg6 (11... Bxg2!? 12. Rg1 Bh3 13. Rxg7 Bxh2? 14. Bh5 would create a picturesque win for White.) 12. O-O would be slightly in White's favor.

 

10... g5!

Black seizes a slight initiative with his kingside threats.

 

11. Bg3 Bxg3 12. fxg3!

The best way to battle back is to open the f-file, otherwise Black's initiative gets too strong. White is now in trouble and must sacrifice a piece, but he keeps some initiative for the remainder of the game and is eventually able to force a draw by perpetual check.

12... g4

 










13. Nxe4! gxf3

13... Bxe4 14. Nd2 Bf5 15. c4

 

14. gxf3 dxe4 15. fxe4 Bg6!

15... Bxe4?! allows White a dangerous initiative along that opened f-file, though it may be that Black can survive after 16. Bh5! O-O (16... Bg6? 17. Bxg6 fxg6 18. Qxe6+) 17. Rf4 (also possible is 17. Rxf7!? Nf6 18. Rxf8+ Kxf8 19. Rf1) 17... Bd3! (17... Bf5 18. e4!) 18. Qd1 Bg6 19. Qg4 Kh7 20. Raf1 Bxh5 21. Qxh5 f5 22. Rh4 Rf6 23. e4 Qe8

 

16. Rf4 c6 17. Bg4 Nf8

Cautiously defending e6 from sacrifices. From here on out, Black plays very strongly to improve his position and make progress, but White keeps battling to make his task difficult. Though I don't know the situation on the clock, I assume that became a factor.

 

18. d5!? Qd7 19. Rd1 Qe7 20. Qc4 h5 21. Bh3 Rd8 22. Rd4 Rd6 23. Rf2 e5 24. Rdd2 Nh7 25. Qb4 cxd5 26. exd5 O-O 27. c4 b6 28. e4 a5 29. Qa4 Ng5 30. Bg2 f5 31. exf5 Bxf5 32. Qd1 Bg4! 33. Qf1 Rdf6 34. h3 Nf3+ 35. Bxf3 Bxf3 36. d6 Qd7 37. Rd5? e4

37... Qg7!

 

38. Rg5+ Kf7 39. c5 bxc5 40. Qc4+ Qe6 41. Qxc5 Qxd6 42. Qa7+ Ke6 43. Qe3 Rb8 44. Qc3 Kf7 45. Rd2 Qb6+ 46. Kh2 Re8?










White gets his wish and is now able to force a draw by perpetual check.

46... Rd8! prevents the Rook incursion and keeps a winning advantage.

47. Qc4+! Qe6 48. Rd7+! Re7 49. Rxe7+ Kxe7 50. Qc7+ Kf8

Black cannot escape the checks.

 

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Copyright © 2011 by Michael Goeller